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TheEngineer
Friday, 28 June 2013 at 2:59pm
Thursday, 8 December 2016 at 4:12pm
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page 1 of 6 recent posts

Thread: Research Assistant/Associate Conundrum

posted
11-Jan-17, 12:41
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posted about 1 week ago
Thanks TreeofLife for an elaborate answer.

Thread: Research Assistant/Associate Conundrum

posted
11-Jan-17, 11:13
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posted about 1 week ago
It's quite common to see Research Associate posts advertised with the following conditions: "If the PhD will be awarded shortly, the appointment will be made at the Research Assistant level until the PhD has been completed".

I have picked out two keywords in there, "awarded" and "completed". For someone who's had a successful viva, made corrections and handed in the final thesis, but NOT yet graduated, will they be employed as Research Assistant or Research Associate? Many thanks.

Thread: Post doc- an adventure abroad?!

posted
08-Jan-17, 10:51
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posted about 1 week ago
Last year, jobs.ac.uk hosted a webinar where they discussed research opportunities in Germany for non-Germans. Three non-German postdocs gave their views about language, culture, work ethics etc. You may find it helpful.
http://www.jobs.ac.uk/careers-advice/working-in-higher-education/2467/postdoctoral-and-research-opportunities-in-germany-google-hangout-on-air-summary

Thread: Switching lab (racial gender minority issue)

posted
30-Dec-16, 11:16
edited about 29 seconds later
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posted about 3 weeks ago
By "switching labs"; do you mean moving to another university or simply moving to another research group within your university? There's no guarantee another lab will "embrace" you fully. It may turn out to be worse, but you have to do a thorough check before making that move.

Five months is too short a period to cultivate a working relationship. Take an initiative to reach out to your colleagues. Target one or two who are seemingly friendly to you, say hi to them every morning. Talk about your interests, sports, movies, your culture, global politics, language etc. Whenever there are social events, such as the end of year dinner for the lab, don't hesitate to take part. If someone invites you for a cup of coffee, don't shy away. It may turn out that your colleagues view you as someone who is reclusive, shy and difficult to engage in a conversation with. You should also seek help from laboratory technicians and other support staff on certain techniques.

Thread: Positive ending after R&R

posted
21-Dec-16, 12:39
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posted about 1 month ago
What an inspiring story @fatbob. Your story will undoubtedly help many who've gone (will go) through a similar experience. Well done and congrats.

Thread: Questions on thesis

posted
14-Dec-16, 12:03
edited about 8 minutes later
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posted about 1 month ago
I am in the engineering field, so my scenario may be different from yours.I started my PhD in October 2013 and I submitted a few weeks ago (waiting for the viva). The literature review in my upgrade report is substantially different from the thesis lit review. Midway through my experiments, I made quite a number of modifications which included conducting additional tests to widen the scope. I finished all the experimental tests in March this year and went into full writing mode. I didn't really have much time for writing before that except for the papers. At the beginning of this year, my thesis just contained a skeleton structure. I started with the literature review (in March) to "align" it with my findings. So I spent close to 7 months from start to finish. I managed to submit two papers which were both accepted in May/June this year. The feedback I got from reviewers was quite helpful. I incorporated these papers into my thesis and they formed the backbone of my results chapters. Good luck.

Thread: Looking for a PhD in Geophysics in Europe

posted
14-Dec-16, 10:37
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posted about 1 month ago
If you are pursuing a funded PhD programme, in most cases the funding bodies pay those funds in advance to the University. These funds pay your stipend, tuition fees, purchase of consumables for your entire PhD duration.My understanding is that EU students already enrolled in UK universities at the time the UK ceases to be a member of EU will continue to pay home fees. Only those who will enrol AFTER the UK has formally left the EU may be required to pay tuition fee at international rates. Lest we forget, UK is still a member of the EU. Just to give you a practical scenario, when UK universities decided to increase tuition fees from £3000/£4000 to about £9,000 (for UK/EU students), this increment only affected future students. Students who had already enrolled continued to pay the old rate, save for the annual inflation-adjusted increments. Just go ahead and apply.

Thread: I need a professional academic advice for pursuing a PhD

posted
12-Dec-16, 11:22
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posted about 1 month ago
Are there any reasons why you aren't so keen to pursue a PhD in a field related to Oil and Gas Engineering? In any case, most PhD projects in engineering (and science) these days tend to be multi-disciplinary in nature. With your background, for instance, it's quite possible to pursue a PhD in areas such as chemical engineering and mechanical engineering under the sub-fields like CFD, combustion, heat transfer, fire engineering. These fields I have mentioned are multi-disciplinary and research groups in most universities dealing with these areas would typically have researchers from various backgrounds such as engineers, physicists, chemists, mathematicians etc. Both Earth Science and Mathematics are quite diverse fields. For instance, there's Applied Maths and Pure Maths. Someone with an engineering background may pursue a PhD in Applied Maths, but highly unlikely to be accepted in Pure Maths. Equally, there are certain fields within Earth Science which closely align with Oil and Gas engineering, others are diametrically opposed. Professors (especially in the UK system) wouldn't accept someone who would struggle and has no basic knowledge of the field. But I understand in the US, it works differently because PhD students there do some coursework for two years or so. The coursework can bridge the knowledge gaps.

Thread: Skype interview for international Post-doc

posted
14-Nov-16, 16:21
edited about 2 seconds later
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posted about 2 months ago
I know you are very anxious to hear the outcome, but I would advise you to be a bit patient. I hope this long wait won't distract you from making progress in your PhD. Good luck.

Thread: Acept Phd, then cancel again?

posted
08-Nov-16, 14:19
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posted about 2 months ago
A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush. I would gladly accept the 2nd choice offer while keeping an eye on the 1st.

Thread: 1 year after defense, still unemployed

posted
25-Oct-16, 00:11
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posted about 3 months ago
At times I feel applying for some postdoc positions is a sheer waste of time because quite often the PI already has someone in mind. Owing to the short duration of most postdoc posts, PIs wouldn't want to take a gamble, they're more comfortable going for someone they know, usually their own PhD students who're in the latter stages of their research. Just this month, I applied for a Postdoc post at some next door university. The topic is very similar to my PhD research and I have even published 4 papers in the same field. Surprisingly, I was not even shortlisted. It turned out that the post was actually reserved for the PI's PhD student, whom I know very well. We do interact occasionally because our PhD topics are in the same engineering theme and we're both at the same stage. But despite having zero publications under his belt, the PI settled for him although I considered myself a stronger candidate.

Thread: PhD at older age?

posted
04-Oct-16, 19:22
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posted about 3 months ago
There are so many on this forum who are in their 40s and pursuing PhD. In my research group, we have a new PhD student in his 50s. You are not that old, after all, life begins at 40.

Thread: Lazy PhD advisor destroyed my experience of doing research and PhD

posted
04-Oct-16, 19:18
edited about 28 seconds later
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posted about 3 months ago
Don't you have a second supervisor? In my university and I am sure that's the case with most UK universities, it's a standard practice to allocate PhD students with at least 2 supervisors.

From my experience as a PhD student, I have observed that SOME of the most sought-after or highly acclaimed professors are very bad supervisors. They are so busy running research groups, meeting potential funders and barely have time for their students. Luckily for me, my first supervisor (who is not a high-profile academic) is extremely good, I have no complaints. My second supervisor is highly acclaimed and is good at bringing in funding and running of the research group, but he is a very BAD supervisor.

Thread: How long to wait for a postdoc to be advertized

posted
12-May-16, 13:12
edited about 21 seconds later
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posted about 8 months ago


there's an exam too? Is it taken just once? They only just pay the annual fee after that?

I have an off-topic question, would this be the same for chemical engineers?
My friend's nephew wants to be one.


Exam is taken just once, afterwards, you only need to pay an annual membership fee. But when renewing the membership, members are required to show evidence of their Continuing Professional Development (CPD) points, which are accumulated through attendance of seminars, webinars, talks/lectures etc.

Regarding Chemical engineers; more information can be picked up from the Institution's website. http://www.icheme.org/membership/member.aspx

Thread: How long to wait for a postdoc to be advertized

posted
05-May-16, 12:45
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posted about 8 months ago
Quote From satchi:
How much is it to be admitted as a chartered Engineer? Feels like a big step to take to relocate. Any news yet?


It's quite expensive but varies according to one's institution. These are the 2016 fees for those seeking admission through my institution (Institution of Structural Engineers).

Application fee: £80
Interview fee: £140
Examination fee: £425
Annual subscription: £305
Registration for CEng £47.80

My two supervisors belong to at least 3 different institutions; I don't know how they manage to pay for such colossal subscriptions.
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