Overview of Tudor_Queen

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Tudor_Queen
Wednesday, 18 November 2015 at 11:56am
Thursday, 23 February 2017 at 9:39am
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page 1 of 30 recent posts

Thread: Supervisors and feedback

posted
22-Feb-17, 19:48
edited about 13 seconds later
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posted about 14 hours ago
Have had barely any feedback. Wonder if they read it at times!

Thread: Problems with supervisor

posted
21-Feb-17, 20:53
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posted about 1 day ago
I don't fully understand the issue. Why do you think your supervisor is acting this way? It is in the supervisor's interest that the student is successful. Just trying to understand better. If the situation isn't going anywhere then maybe changing supervisors will be the solution. But first there may be other things you can try - such as meeting your advisor (do you have one?), diplomatically explaining your perception of the situation, and getting their take on it and advice. They may then speak directly to your supervisor if needed.

Thread: Re-writing abstract for journal

posted
16-Feb-17, 09:51
edited about 26 seconds later
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posted about 1 week ago
Thanks - this sounds good.

Thread: Re-writing abstract for journal

posted
16-Feb-17, 09:14
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posted about 1 week ago
Hi all
I want to submit a paper for publication in a journal. I have previously shared the research at a conference and was wondering how closely I can base the paper abstract on the conference abstract without it being considered plagiarism (or maybe I need to completely re-write it and try not to use any of the same sentences).
Any ideas?

Thread: Getting Help Writing Essays

posted
15-Feb-17, 21:17
edited about 24 seconds later
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posted about 1 week ago
For crying out loud!

Thread: will bad data / methodological issues fail my thesis?

posted
09-Feb-17, 21:21
edited about 2 seconds later
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posted about 1 week ago
Yes, manipulating but not necessarily directly. Some examples are monitoring your data as you are still collecting it (e.g., testing to see if there is a significant result yet), entering covariates so that you get a significant result, only reporting comparisons that yielded statistical results (which means in reality you may have performed many tests on the same data, which didn't yield significant results, increasing your chances of Type I error/false positives). That's as I understand it anyway. We had some a meeting about it, as apparently it is common practice but now there are papers on the damage it can do (e.g., hard to replicate findings, bogus findings) and... well, I think it still happens but people are quiet about it. At the end of the day, it can be the difference between getting published or not... or maybe having a more impressive thesis.

I think if the plan is to conduct exploratory analyses at the onset it is different than those who claim to have set out to test one thing, but secretly tested 10 different things.

Thread: will bad data / methodological issues fail my thesis?

posted
08-Feb-17, 18:29
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posted about 2 weeks ago
Hi all, I've come across this old thread and really interested to hear people's thoughts on it. I'm not faced with this situation myself (not now anyway), and am not sure what I'd do if I were. On one hand it seems OK, as justified by the above posters. But in the light of lots of recent talk about p-hacking, especially in the field of psychology, I wondered what others thought. Would you do it? Is p-hacking talked about at your uni?

Thread: Postgrad Forum Hall of Fame

posted
07-Feb-17, 22:03
edited about 11 seconds later
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posted about 2 weeks ago
Congratulations!!!

Thread: advice needed: scholarship and other PhD

posted
06-Feb-17, 22:11
edited about 27 seconds later
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posted about 2 weeks ago
This feels familiar... I am sure I once advised this before and then pm133 came on and advised otherwise! I agree that there is no need to tell. In my situation, I did it because I had known the potential supervisor for a couple of years and I wanted to tell her rather than she hear it on the vine and be surprised or whatever (academia is a very small world). It didn't risk my PhD position but I can see how it might be something you'd want to consider.

Thread: advice needed: scholarship and other PhD

posted
06-Feb-17, 18:35
edited about 26 seconds later
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posted about 2 weeks ago
Personally I would tell him of my plans. Tell him that your project with him is your first priority and choice (if it is), but that you also will be applying elsewhere to increase your chances of getting funding. He should understand.

Thread: PhD offer - Conditional or Unconditional?

posted
06-Feb-17, 12:23
edited about 1 second later
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posted about 2 weeks ago
Yeh, just ask them.

Thread: ESRC PhD funding chances

posted
03-Feb-17, 12:58
edited about 17 seconds later
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posted about 2 weeks ago
You can ask at the institution you've applied at how many ESRC applications on that pathway they normally get, and how many they normally award.

Thread: How to get into academia without a PhD?

posted
03-Feb-17, 08:41
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posted about 2 weeks ago
Just goes to show how different people read things differently - nothing about this poster's post irks me in the slightest! But then I do know several in our department without a PhD, including the director of undergraduate studies!

Thread: Want to do a PhD - should I do a second Master's?

posted
02-Feb-17, 13:13
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posted about 2 weeks ago
I don't think the additional masters would make you more competitive. But if you're applying for multiple funding options and some of them include the Masters year, then the MRes is definitely a good primer for doing the PhD, if you feel you want or could do with that.

Thread: Questions to ask supervisor

posted
02-Feb-17, 09:46
edited about 23 seconds later
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posted about 3 weeks ago
Hi, Is he asking you to ask him critical questions? Or raising critical points/questions in your lit review?

If it is the former I can see how this is stressful. If you try to force yourself to think of some questions, you'll probably just get stressed! If you are reviewing the literature and writing, questions/issues will just emerge. It may be that you have come across some "issues" that you could bring up to discuss. It may not be that you need to actually be asking questions in the interrogative form. Does that make sense? For example, (depending on your field and topic) maybe you have reviewed some studies and found some conflicting results - they found X, they didn't, or they found Y. This could be something to discuss... as it makes you want to ask why there seems to be this discrepancy. And out of that, your own project could be developed more.

Personally, I don't find it helpful when I'm told to bring a certain type of questions to a supervision meeting... real questions emerge as you go along. Trying to think of some just to please someone is annoying and stressful. I once said in a supervision meeting, "I don't have any questions at this stage - I'm sure they'll emerge later". And sure enough, they have.

Hope this helps.
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