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cloudofash
Friday, 4 April 2014 at 10:53am
Sunday, 2 July 2017 at 9:31pm
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page 1 of 5 recent posts

Thread: Starting PhD with maternity leave plans

posted
28-Aug-17, 16:16
edited about 4 seconds later
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posted about 3 weeks ago
Quote From PracticalMouse:
I got pregnant about 10 months into my funded PhD. It worked out great - because my husband took on a massive amount of childcare after my maternity leave finished to give me the space to complete. I submitted on time, and now don't have to worry about being an 'old' mother and can look for jobs without thinking about when to get pregnant. However I do think if you want a career in academia, more than one is madness. I literally do not know a single woman with more than one child who has been able to make that work (unless her husband is a stay-at-home full-time dad).

Make sure before you embark on this route that your husband is totally committed too...you will need his support.

I know several actually and in one case, the husband is also a researcher with his own lab.

Thread: Why did you leave/are considering leaving academia?

posted
05-Aug-17, 21:45
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posted about 1 month ago
Quote From pm133:
Quote From cloudofash:


I agree. I often wonder how is it justifiable that we are researching first world illnesses but milions of people are dying because they have no access to clean water.


That is a good example but in fairness the problem you are describing is not down to a shortage of money. It is down to corruption in the affected countries. No amount of money will fix it without fundamental structural reform.

Well yeah, but I meant is more like why am I here working on this when I should be working on that instead.

Thread: Why did you leave/are considering leaving academia?

posted
05-Aug-17, 15:39
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posted about 1 month ago

In short, science needs to get its finger out and start doing something to justify its vast budget.


I agree. I often wonder how is it justifiable that we are researching first world illnesses but milions of people are dying because they have no access to clean water.

Thread: Ethical conundrum

posted
04-Jul-17, 23:40
edited a moment later
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posted about 2 months ago
Home office is the body responsible for giving out the licenses in the UK. I would make a call there.

Thread: Studying in Germany

posted
09-Jun-17, 17:21
edited about 49 seconds later
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posted about 3 months ago
I dont know about a course but what if you came to Germany as an aupair first? You wouldnt have to pay anything and I believe that is the best way to learn a new language. Additionally, this would give you some knowledge of the Universities (and their quality) there.

Thread: Project with first time PhD supervisor

posted
16-May-17, 20:12
edited about 15 seconds later
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posted about 4 months ago
So at the moment I am the only one who has a different experience:) My supervisor is a first time supervisor but I joined the lab when he had it running for a year together with very able technician.
He knows his stuff, has great ideas and is really invested in my progress.
I think this really depends on a person and their abilities. My supervisor is on a prestigious fellowship only a few get so I reckon that could be something that can offer reassurance (not that those not on a great fellowship are not good, just need to look at other stuff as well).

Thread: Research assistant/ Postdoc

posted
16-May-17, 20:02
edited about 17 seconds later
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posted about 4 months ago
I am gonna have to echo the other people and say that as researchers, we dont believe you can get a postdoc without a PhD. Its a postdoc for a reason. As a post doctorate. Academic one, not a professional.
Would a different country be an option for a clinical doctor?

Thread: 2 years of failed interviews

posted
16-May-17, 19:57
edited about 11 seconds later
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posted about 4 months ago
I have never seen any age restriction like you mention. I have managed to get 5 or 6 offers for a PhD after I have already turned 30 (bit over actually). So dont worry about that.

Like Tree, I believe that MRes will help you. Good luck and dont give up just yet.

Thread: Publish or Perish

posted
05-Jul-16, 13:34
edited about 19 seconds later
Avatar for cloudofash
posted about 1 year ago
Quote Also, access to cheaper childcare would help but in my opinion the single biggest thing we could do is to legislate to force all employers with more than 10 members of staff to provide free wrap around childcare on-site for all parents from 8am to 6pm. This would revolutionise the workplace and be the start of true equality.


I absolutely agree with this.

Thread: Publish or Perish

posted
05-Jul-16, 13:33
Avatar for cloudofash
posted about 1 year ago
Dunham, of course its not easy for fathers neither. There is however greater pressure on females, plenty of research available for this so you can read about it if you want to.

MrFox, I have a supporting husband. That is not often the problem. The problem is the fact that if you want to have a child and spend some time on maternity leave, this will have a negative impact on your career. There is some funding available but its very competitive (like everything in science) so women do come out worse. The emotional and social pressure is worse for women in this sense.

How many of you actually have kids? I am asking because until you have actually experienced this yourself its hard to understand it. It really is.

Thats why there is Athenna Swan etc, because this problem is recognized.

It is undoubtedly getting better. Its it not just sharing responsibilities, its the conscious and unconscious bias when hiring (again very well documented), childcare problems etc.
Nobody has it easy in academia, thats for sure. But pretending this problem doesnt exist or just putting it down to not very supportive partner isnt going to change that. Women do bring children to the world and they want to be with them during the first few month of their life. It is absolutely heartbreaking to leave a screaming four month child at the nursery because you have to go to work for the whole day, because you are worried to take full maternity leave. Because you have to publish. As I mentioned, there is research available on this issue stating that this is a concern for more women than men. I almost get a feeling reading this thread that women should chose between the career and motherhood?

Thread: Publish or Perish

posted
03-Jul-16, 15:56
edited about 5 minutes later
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posted about 1 year ago
Dunham, as a female in academia I am shocked by how opinionated can somebody without any direct experience of the issue be. What do you know about the pressures of being a mother? Nothing. Even when you are the one having a career and have a supporting partner, you will still feel terrible for not being around your kids. So yes, there is an advantage for males. What an ignorant post...

Thread: Mres and PhD

posted
17-May-16, 21:26
Avatar for cloudofash
posted about 1 year ago
Quote From Dunham:
I am writing this quite often but is there a special reason why it has to be the UK? If it's not oxbridge or imperial college, it is a waste of money for a non-UK student (just MY opinion ;) ). This is not supposed to be UK bashing, but you get the same education and the same standards at countless other european universities but often without ridiculously high tuition/fees.

Most 2-year master degrees in Europe are nowadays research focused. It is not true that you spent most of the time in seminars or lectures. In my case, more than a year was pure lab work (9-month thesis project + several internships before that) and I don't think there are huge differences between biology and chemistry. You just have to look for the right program. The lectures during the master have the additional advantage that you go more into depth while still covering a broad area. During the PhD or the thesis you usually directly focus on your specific project and the really narrow research area it is in. If you know that your future research focus will lie in the field of organic chemistry, it can be beneficial to do a 2-year organic chemistry master after a general chemistry bachelor instead of directly continuing with a PhD or other specialized projects. I started my PhD a couple of months ago and the time for literature is limited. Due to the lab work you usually focus on the things that directly apply to your project even though I would sometimes like to read much more and think it would be highly beneficial....the day just has 24 hours ;) So it is good to have a solid knowledge basis before you start the PhD


I agree. I would add UCL to the mix of Universitites:)

Thread: Mres and PhD

posted
17-May-16, 00:05
Avatar for cloudofash
posted about 1 year ago
Its competetive, so upper second with no placements years etc find it a bit harder. If you can afford MRes, why not? It will help you. Choose a good Uni thought.

Thread: Computational PhD in biology?

posted
16-May-16, 12:45
Avatar for cloudofash
posted about 1 year ago
Quote From Dunham:
Quote From mchan:
having had left industry to start a PhD which is half an half wet lab and bioinformatics, I can say to you that EVERYBODY in the Pharma world is looking for a PhD grad with computational bio background.


That is, pardon, bullshit or at least extremely exaggerated ;) For sure the chances to land an industry job are higher than for, let's say taxonomists or marine biologists, but most major universities nowadays have full bioinformatics degrees and therefore produce a shitload of people with computational biology background. I have friends who specialized in bioinformatics and they have a hard time finding jobs as well. There might be a certain lack of people with an absolutely unique skillset in pharmaceutical companies but that applies to some "computational biologists".

Overall, I think that the chances to land a position in academia are higher with a computational biology PhD but very low nonetheless.



What are those unique skills do you reckon?

Thread: Postgrad routes into teaching

posted
20-Apr-16, 13:58
edited about 20 seconds later
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posted about 1 year ago
Yes. I think that is it.
The fees are covered by a student loan and then come out of your salary.

The scheme looks great, but I think its a question of where you would be placed as well since (although they will take your preference into the account) you could end up all over England.
I have a family so should I look into a teaching carreer I would have to put up with that prejudice.
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