Overview of Ephiny

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Ephiny 1 star member
Sunday, 1 November 2009 at 4:56pm
Tuesday, 22 November 2016 at 12:41pm
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page 1 of 11 recent posts

Thread: female gym users required for dissertation research

posted
19-Jan-17, 11:53
edited about 23 seconds later
by Ephiny 1 star member
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posted about 2 days ago
I did the survey but got an what looks like an error 'System Message: Invalid survey_code' at the end.

Not sure if this means the results didn't go through, but if you don't seem to be getting many responses, maybe check in case that's why!

Thread: Sick of 2.2 haunting me. Please read and help me understand what I have to do!

posted
13-Jan-17, 10:18
edited about 16 seconds later
by Ephiny 1 star member
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posted about 1 week ago
I don't understand why you don't have a grade for your MSc? I did a Master's by research (MRes) and it was graded (pass, merit, distinction). Was this in the UK?

Otherwise, unfortunately the competition is just very tough for funded PhD places, and many of the applicants you're competing against may have a good undergraduate degree and a MSc as well. It's great that you have research experience though, I think that would be a strong point in your favour. Keep trying, but maybe also look into other options such as whether you can self-fund while working part time, or if you could be sponsored by an employer?

Thread: First rewritten chapter a disaster

posted
11-Jan-17, 15:02
edited about 3 seconds later
by Ephiny 1 star member
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posted about 1 week ago
Only you can decide whether you want to continue or not, but I agree with having a face-to-face chat with your supervisors first. Ask for their honest opinion about how far you are from a PhD-standard thesis - it might not be as bad as you think, and if it is, at least you know where you stand and can make a decision based on that.

Also, are there other options you can consider, e.g. if you decide you can't face going through the full process of resubmitting for the PhD, could the work you've done already be considered for an MPhil instead?

Thread: Examiner Disagreement

posted
11-Jan-17, 11:58
edited about 24 seconds later
by Ephiny 1 star member
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posted about 1 week ago
In my opinion your supervisor is right and you can't fail, as you've done the minor revisions that your pass was dependent on. I suspect your external knows that, hence all the delaying tactics.

I hope you hear something from the chair soon, and glad you're managing to stay positive. Hopefully the end is in sight now!

Thread: Opportunities for researchers in their 50s

posted
11-Jan-17, 11:47
by Ephiny 1 star member
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posted about 1 week ago
Yes agree about jobs.ac.uk (despite the name, they advertise international jobs), and the New Scientist job search is usually good. Maybe a subject-specific publication in your field might advertise relevant opportunities. Or look at university websites, including individual research group's pages.

I don't know how your age would affect things exactly - I think your experience would be in your favour, compared with younger applicants who maybe `only' have the experience of their PhD, although if you don't have a recent publication record that could be an obstacle in applying for a research post. Depends on the role and the institution though (it might matter less for a more teaching-focused position).

It seems like you have nothing to lose by applying. Good luck!

Thread: How important are PhD examiners' reputations?

posted
10-Jan-17, 12:03
by Ephiny 1 star member
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posted about 1 week ago
This is the study I was thinking of, which talks about the 'dangers' of inexperienced examiners: https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/555a/7e7198c9faca2656451c05bc1d51d55cb7cc.pdf
It does focus on the Australian system, which is different from many other countries (no viva, I think), but some of the findings might apply.

I guess if you're not in a particular rush to get your result, why not wait a couple of months and have the examiner you prefer?

Thread: How important are PhD examiners' reputations?

posted
10-Jan-17, 07:24
by Ephiny 1 star member
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posted about 1 week ago
I have also heard that early-career/young academics tend to be tougher as they have more to prove and less experience of the range of acceptable work - there was a survey with that finding that I'll try to find the link to.

Thread: Examiner's Report - How much detail should there be?

posted
06-Jan-17, 22:00
by Ephiny 1 star member
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posted about 2 weeks ago
My viva report was about a page and a half, and includes 7 bullet points describing the particular areas I needed to focus on. This is for a revise & resubmit. It was a bit less detailed than I was expecting, but we did discuss all the points in much more detail during the viva itself so I had a chance to ask questions and make notes.

I do think this is going to vary greatly between different examiners and different subject areas, so not sure you can necessarily compare. But the corrections should be clearly explained, and (in my opinion) should relate to concerns raised during the viva, not be completely new things never mentioned before.

Good luck getting this sorted out. It's beyond belief how badly you've been treated and how long this has dragged on.

Thread: Modest (6 months) Corrections despite publications

posted
05-Jan-17, 20:51
by Ephiny 1 star member
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posted about 2 weeks ago
I completely understand the nervousness - I am in the middle of corrections myself and have similar doubts sometimes. But we can only do our best. Good luck!

Thread: MREs or MSc??

posted
05-Jan-17, 12:47
edited about 46 seconds later
by Ephiny 1 star member
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posted about 2 weeks ago
Sounds like you've answered your own question - go for the MSc if that's the work you feel passionate about doing. Having the name of a prestigious institution on your CV never hurts, but I don't think it matters as much at postgraduate level, and it's definitely not worth struggling through a course that doesn't suit you and you don't really want to do just for that.

Thread: Modest (6 months) Corrections despite publications

posted
03-Jan-17, 10:03
by Ephiny 1 star member
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posted about 2 weeks ago
It's normal to be given some corrections (even if you already have publications), that doesn't make you a failure. If you do the corrections asked for, there should be no problem being awarded your PhD. And 1 year is the usual time allowed for writing up after funding ends, so clearly that's not an unreasonable time to take (yes some people do finish quicker, but many use the full amount of time, especially with a job and family responsibilities to deal with too).

It sounds like you got minor corrections, but the examiners allowed you 6 months to do them as you work full-time, is that right? But you wouldn't normally be expected to do new experiments as part of your corrections - did they ask you to do that?

Thread: How brave were you in starting your PHD?

posted
28-Dec-16, 12:28
edited about 52 seconds later
by Ephiny 1 star member
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posted about 3 weeks ago
Of course a PhD is about doing new research, but usually that means making a (small) contribution to an already-established field, not inventing an entirely new field that has never been researched before :).

However, it sounds like your proposal is actually an interdisciplinary one that draws from multiple fields? If that's the case, it's an opportunity to do some very interesting and unique research. The only problem is that with interdisciplinary projects there can be difficulty getting other people to understand or accept your work, e.g. when it comes to submitting to journals or conferences, or choosing your PhD examiners. Also, when applying for postdocs or jobs afterwards, or looking for teaching opportunities, sometimes you can end up not having enough expertise in any one field compared to other PhDs who have specialised in that one field.

You also have to be very independent when doing interdisciplinary research, as even if you have multiple supervisors, only you will be the expert in your particular intersection between the different fields. That may be a good or bad thing depending on your perspective!

Thread: Thesis Corrections...can you re-send them?

posted
24-Dec-16, 18:14
edited about 22 seconds later
by Ephiny 1 star member
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posted about 1 month ago
I agree you should leave it for now. If you sent the internal a list of the agreed corrections as you understood them, and they didn't reply with any changes or comments, then it's reasonable to assume they had no objections.

Thread: Failed Phd, got MPhil

posted
21-Dec-16, 15:11
edited about 18 seconds later
by Ephiny 1 star member
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posted about 1 month ago
Sorry, I wasn't meaning to blame you, just thinking of how the examiners might defend themselves if you appeal their decision.

I just noticed you mentioned a second viva - so this was a revise/resubmit, rather than corrections? In that case there should have been an option for the examiners to give you minor corrections after your second viva, which would seem the obvious choice if the only problem was that 5% of the revisions were missed?

I can understand the frustration - if your work really wasn't sufficient for a PhD you should have been made aware of that much earlier, ideally by your supervisor before you got to the stage of submitting. Sound like a good plan to talk to the student union rep and figure out whether you have a case for appeal (tell them about one of the examiners not attending the second viva, and any other procedural irregularities!), then you can decide what you want to do.

You're right though that it's not the end of the world, however disappointing. An MPhil is better than nothing, and, most importantly, you already have a job (which many people struggle to do even if they pass their PhD!)

Thread: Failed Phd, got MPhil

posted
21-Dec-16, 13:29
by Ephiny 1 star member
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posted about 1 month ago
Quote From Gwen86:
I meant lack of guidance from your primary supervisor. They should have worked with you on interpreting the report and reviewing your corrected thesis - it sounds like that didn't happen.


Is there definitely a requirement for the supervisor to be involved in the post-viva corrections? I mean, it's nice if they are, but I'm wondering whether it's required under university regulations, as technically your PhD is over?

If not, there might be better grounds for appeal, such as if you were given a pass subject to corrections, and you did the corrections but still didn't pass? Although you do say you only did 95% of the corrections, so they could say the corrections haven't been completed. Was there no opportunity for you to ask for clarification on the corrections you didn't understand?
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