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newlease36
Thursday, 25 July 2013 at 11:10pm
Wednesday, 12 April 2017 at 3:22pm
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page 1 of 2 recent posts

Thread: Crushed

posted
12-Apr-17, 15:37
Avatar for newlease36
posted about 2 weeks ago
just wanted to add and hadn't space in last message

People are emotional beings at the end of the day, so you need to sell yourself and your case at meeting. 2 publications are great: this all universities really care about (my uni anyway). You have a lot going for you going going into this meeting. Don't let self-doubt take that away from you.

Good luck. every problem has a solution.

Thread: Crushed

posted
12-Apr-17, 15:36
Avatar for newlease36
posted about 2 weeks ago
I am sorry to hear of your situation. But it does seem like there are solutions, provided others are prepared to work with you (not a given, I know, but you have reasonable grounds).

From what you wrote, it seems like if you had a year you could get it done, but you only have 6 months left. I would ask for a meeting with supervisors/committee/ head of dept. I would demonstrate 2 things in that meeting. Firstly, what you have been doing in last 3.5 years and as result why you need an extension. and secondly your plan for proceeding forward with time line. So you need to sit down and make realistic plan to finish before the meeting. Be realistic, but i think if you need 14 months not 12 better ask for that now not later. I wouldn't expect to be funded for that 6/8 month extension- not saying that is right- but i just wouldn't expect it. So that's another hurdle... if you can't get a loan from family member or friend , maybe credit union or bank (live frugally, it will be worth it, since you have come this far)

I would document meeting and try to keep record of as much as possible (emails ect) . Maybe if there is a grad student adviser I would go to him/her first. or if you think one of your supervisors would support you, go to them first . it would be nice to have someone in your corner at meeting.

You are not really in a bad position, asking in advance for extension. also you need it due to difficulties that weren't to do with laziness or procrastination; you have been working hard and have valid reasons for needing extension.
I know every school is different. But I know lots of people who got extensions and it wasn't seen as a big deal. some had to pay fees (or partial fees) and their funding wasn't extended, but they got it done and it was worth it.

Contd

Thread: In a voscious Cycle

posted
05-Apr-17, 19:34
Avatar for newlease36
posted about 3 weeks ago
I think you need to do 3 things. First talk to your supervisor and ask for guidance in how to move forward. Try and develop a plan together for how to move forward. he/she could make suggestions, you go away and develop a plan based on that discussion and then send it to him/her for feedback.

Second you need to get some breaks and hobbies/downtime built into your days and weeks. This is vital. research can be stressful and if you don't have good self-care you will burn out. exercise is great, it relieves stress and gives you energy and motivation. being outside is also great and some social activities are good. it could be anything from a painting class once a week to a book club or a yoga class.

the third thing I think you need to do is after you have worked on a plan for going forward, is take a 5 day break and go home (if you can afford it all). it will reduce your stress and give you some perspective. if you cant afford that, the international society in most universities organises discounted trips... so you will get to meet other international students and get some perspective and refresh yourself.

If you feel talking to someone would help, there is usually counselling centre in uni or it is possible to find reasonably priced ones outside of uni.

Doing a PhD can be really difficult at times, so don't be too hard on yourself. I feel stupid all the time and am not even doing so great myself, at this current writing up phase. Most phd students have difficult phases and its always a bit harder if your miles from friends and family.

Blog: Musings of the Psychology Alpaca

posted
03-Mar-17, 22:40
edited about 27 seconds later
Avatar for newlease36
posted about 1 month ago
sounds like your feeling a bit disheartened.... every Phd student goes through that phase I think... I know I did.. my advice? get a clear plan for going ahead, but even still be prepared for odd setback. Take a break if your feeling disheartened... you can afford 5 day break.. turn off laptop and phone and you will back with the motivation and energy to keep going.

I think a lot of getting phd has to do with perseverance.

Thread: advice needed: scholarship and other PhD

posted
04-Feb-17, 22:57
Avatar for newlease36
posted about 2 months ago
definitely

Thread: How to get into academia without a PhD?

posted
03-Feb-17, 19:35
edited about 1 hour later
Avatar for newlease36
posted about 2 months ago
[/quote] Nothing the original poster said bothered me in the slightest and nor should it. Nothing she did or said will have any impact on me or anyone else on here.

Some of the responses to her were pretty crass and immature.[/quote]

1) I don't think its your place to tell someone how they 'should' react. Your not a moral authority on people's reaction or opinions.

2) it didn't anger me... I thought the thread was amusing.

2) while I found it funny, it did, I will admit, irk me somewhat, not for the reasons you cite, but for professional reasons. Sort of like if someone wanted to be a doctor without the hassle of going to medical school. or how irked I am by people with fake internet PhDs or who simply lie about having having a Phd...

that being said, I do regret my former post, mainly because it was a bit mean. I was hoping since it was started 2 years ago, the poster would not be on the forum. i suppose, in hindsight, ridiculing someone on the net isn't entirely fair...you never know what there going through when they read the post. if I could delete my original post I would

also all that being said, I know of people, with Msc's who managed to get in through part time teaching or admin work and then progressed to a do PhD while still doing admin work/ teaching. So they were in paid employment while doing their PhD's so it was less of financial burden, but also a lot more work.

and it was a lot to do with knowing the right people and being in the right place at the right time.

Thread: Problems after prelims - how to complete my thesis

posted
02-Feb-17, 23:15
edited about 15 seconds later
Avatar for newlease36
posted about 2 months ago
sounds really tough. I'm not experienced enough to advise. can you talk to your supervisor /grad student support advisor about the possibility of switching to part time to allow you finish and still work to pay off your loans.

A better solution would be if you could negotiate with the bank for an extension on your loan repayments.

Seems like you have come so far, and are a strong candidate, I hope you find a solution.

Thread: How to get into academia without a PhD?

posted
02-Feb-17, 23:00
edited about 19 seconds later
Avatar for newlease36
posted about 2 months ago
well this thread amused me. Here's me coming to the end of my PhD, feeling like my c.v doesn't look good enough to get me a teaching assistant post and feeling quite glum about it.

I hope the poster doesn't read my response because I'm not trying to belittle her. But in fairness, coming on a postgraduate forum and saying I think I'm better than you mugs slaving away at PhD, I'm actually probably a superstar really, even though I have nothing that would prove this by the way of work experience or actual qualifications, but i do have a MSc a pair of rose tinted glasses and no concept of how obnoxious , irritating and dumb I'm being. Oh and I also have answer for everything. So i would like to science please.

That being said I know some people with professional qualifications (nurses/doctors) who started out teaching clinical skills and then progressed by teaching and doing a phd at the same time to tenured posts. They all did do PhDs though.

anyway this thread amused me. I am interested in keeping it going. Kind of makes me feel like maybe I have a chance in academia (if I ever finish the write up!!!). needed that today, as I was mulling over my not so stellar cv.

Thread: Post-Phd... No post! Advice appreciated

posted
01-Feb-17, 16:07
edited about 1 minute later
Avatar for newlease36
posted about 2 months ago
Thanks for you post. I'm finishing up a PhD and looking into the job market so your post and replies were very helpful. All great advice from previous posters. I do think it does seems to be a lot about networking and meeting the right person at the right time. Your supervisor or work colleague recommending your to a friend ect.

But I just had to wonder if you are not even getting an interview, seems like there could be something a miss with your materials. I would advise getting senior academic you trust to look at them and advise you and also maybe someone at the career services at your university.

Congratulations on the teaching post jobs!! For the immediate future I would be thrilled with that (despite obvious cons). Does seem like you really need a research post though moving forward.

I wish you best of luck, I wouldn't give up just yet, if its your dream, But I would give myself a timeline and look at alt careers. There is definitely life outside academia.

Thread: article request

posted
10-Jan-17, 17:57
edited about 2 seconds later
Avatar for newlease36
posted about 3 months ago
Thank you MusCog-- I thought I had tried that.. sorry
thanks again!!

Thread: article request

posted
07-Jan-17, 20:27
Avatar for newlease36
posted about 3 months ago
Can anyone help me access this article?

Much appreciated if you can, thanks

Paranoid Delusions in Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders and Depression: The Transdiagnostic Role of Expectations of Negative Events and Negative Self-esteem.
Author(s):
Bentall, Richard;Rouse, Georgina;Kinderman, Peter;Blackwood, Nigel;Howard, Rob;Moore, Rosie;Cummins, Sinead;Corcoran, Rhiannon
Source Title:
Journal of Nervous & Mental Disease

Thread: To go on leave or no

posted
09-Dec-16, 15:04
edited about 16 seconds later
Avatar for newlease36
posted about 4 months ago
there's an argument to be made for either option. But from personal experience, if I actually take a good guilt free break, I'm twice as productive and motivated when I come back. This year I went to Algarve for 6 days and my phone broke the day before Ieft. No email/ no twitter and I didn't look at a book. It was a total change of scene and I was busy, so I actually surprised myself, by not thinking about my phd at all some days. It was a nice holiday, in a nice location, but it wasn't steller as holidays go; I got sick for a day or two/ my sister got sick. it was a bit too hot ect..... even still it did me the world of good. Really put things in perspective and I came back so much more motivated and have increased my output and quality of work.

I'm under pressure to finish up. But I'm taking a week off for Xmas,and I'm turning off my phone and not going near my laptop... I know for me, Ill work twice as well when I come back.

Thread: Is a PhD really worth it?

posted
09-Dec-16, 14:57
Avatar for newlease36
posted about 4 months ago
Personally I think since you have already put in 5.5 years, you should , if you can at all, finish.

Is it possible to work with your supervisor to come up with a plan to finish. Results don't have to be groundbreaking or even publishable . Your research just needs to be be theoretically and methodologically sound. Can you build on what you have and tie up some up lose ends with your current research, so as it across as , you understood the theory and had a good rationale for doing what you did. And then that you proceeded in fairly logical fashion, and conducted your research in methodologically sound fashion. It's okay if you made an odd mistake here and there, as long as you learned from it and used that knowledge, to go further.

So basically, good rationale (understanding of theory, finding gap in knowledge where you could contribute) and then methodologically sound and progressing research, even if results are all non significant.

If you could come up with a plan that would give you that and see you finish in a year or 18 months, I think it would be well worth it.

If finances are an issue, is there any way your ex could bear brunt of childcare costs, until finish up and then when you get a job you make it up. If there's any way she could help you out in this way it would benefit you both and your child in the long run.

Thread: Is it still possible? PhD dreams...

posted
06-Dec-16, 19:46
edited about 7 minutes later
Avatar for newlease36
posted about 4 months ago
I don't see a point in an MSc/MRes as I want to do a PhD for my own personal interests rather than for status/career goals,

I think you misunderstood me. I wasn't advising pursuing a Msc for status but rather to improve your chances of getting a good funded Phd. You seem to have made up your mind about that though, so I suppose there's nothing to be lost from applying seeing what comes from it. The fact you have publications especially first authors, should really work in your favour as it proves you can do quality research. Your long history of work experience as tech proves dedication to the field and that you have technical skills. Its definitely worth a shot. But don't take any offer you get, just because its an offer... make sure its funded and that you will have opportunity to work independently and pursue what interests you.

You say you don't want to pursue a post doc, and I can understand that. But you may find you enjoy research, not just technical aspects and want to do independent research (ie work as academic/ Pi in industry) and you may decide that a few years of insecurity as post doc are necessary evil to achieve that aim.

So my advice don't rule out options of using your Phd to further your employment prospects, by choosing a poor phd in a crap lab . If your going to put in the 4 years, you might as well get everything you can from it. and to me from the sounds it (your work experience/ published papers) you could do very well in Phd programme.

Also even just from the point of view of enjoying the Phd, poorly funded departments and labs can make doing research extremely difficult and set up roadblocks. Also it seems in sciences some people take on phds merely to do grunt work for their own projects.-some people are very happy with this arrangement. But from your posts I don't think this is what you want.

Thread: Is it still possible? PhD dreams...

posted
05-Dec-16, 20:18
Avatar for newlease36
posted about 4 months ago
I'm not in your field, and every field is definitely different, but I don't think age will matter - why should it? you are likely more stable and have great work experience.If I were hiring I would prefer older person with experience on the job. All I can say in my field age isn't a factor and I know lots of older 30's and 40's doing Phd's and doing quite well.

In my field, however a 2.2 would pose a challenge, particularly when it comes to getting funding. Your experience, and the evidence of promotions in your job will work in your favour, and counteract that somewhat. Although if you don't have references to back that up, this is another challenge (as you are aware). But as another poster said, you don't know the first guy won't give you a good reference.

You say doing a masters isn't an option now, but personally I feel its your best option to get a Phd (one with funding and in a good lab, in an area you want (all so important factors).

You would sail through a Msc with your research experience and if you put the work in could get a 1.1. this changes he game for you so significantly- a 2.2 degree earned when you were much younger but offset by years of experience and 1.1 Msc: you would be a very attractive candidate. I fear without Msc (with good grade) you will end getting unfunded phd, or in a crappy lab, or not quite in area you want. (that's what I have seen in my field).

If finances are issue, work for a year of two and save up, it will be worth it. you could perhaps do it part time, while working.

I have heard that neuroscience is over populated with Phds, so bear that in mind. Job security is crap is seems for phds in any filed.
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