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robinwestwales
Thursday, 23 December 2010 at 9:39pm
Saturday, 12 August 2017 at 9:07pm
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Thread: Has this ever been done to get a PhD before?

posted
12-Aug-17, 21:13
edited about 6 minutes later
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posted about 1 week ago
PhD recruitment committees will always be particularly interested in the research project or dissertation mark. Maybe focus on that instead of PhD apps this year and actually see if you are good at research and enjoy it (you might have done a research project in your 3rd year so forgive me if that is the case). So, you might get a 2.1 overall, but with a very good research project mark (say over 75) in the 4th year that would look more favourable. I can see where some other posters are coming from re consistency and knowledge.

Whilst you might be enthused by PhD topics within 'one of the 'top 5 institutions' have you looked elsewhere (and, indeed beyond the Russell Group?). Do have a look around as there might be even better more suitable departments, projects and supervisors. League table positions seem important to you (since you refer to the interest uni as 'one of the top 5', rather than just saying nothing), take no notice of league tables, something really for A level students. REF tables might be useful, but research and supervisor fit, location and support/'feeling' of department are just as important, if not more so. Where you get your PhD from means nothing (or shouldn’t). The uni just funds the research and awards it after external examination.

Thread: Is a PhD worth it for me?

posted
07-Aug-17, 17:39
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posted about 1 week ago
Quote From TreeofLife:
Definitely more needs to be in a PhD to focus on giving it real life applicability.


This leads into a debate about the future nature of doctoral level qualifications. The PhD can possibly be seen as first and foremost about the doing and defence of a piece of academic research. This has been the case since the degree first came to the UK in about 1917. A thesis, and through this particular academic skills and knowledges are developed. With increasing numbers of people working for the degree and holders of it seeking employment outside of academia, there are a few questions being asked about whether the PhD needs to recognise this, i.e enabling the development of 'real life' (or more marketable) skills beyond academic research. However, since the 1980's there has been a more professional, 'real-life' alternative to the PhD, yet of doctoral level: The professional doctorate. These have not been that popular (funding is difficult to get), but they do develop professional skills in-situ (in job role and/or professional context). People do these mid-career. Possibly, elements of the professional doctorate could be taken into the traditional doctorate in the future, or people would have the option of doing so.

Thread: Is a PhD worth it for me?

posted
07-Aug-17, 13:07
edited about 9 minutes later
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posted about 1 week ago
Quote From TreeofLife:
Have attempted to job seek outside of academia, my take on it is that a PhD isn't worth a damn when it comes to "experience". Employers couldn't have cared less about those so-called transferable skills from my PhD.


This is so true for me as well. The transferable (read marketable) skills from doing a PhD listed by various HE stakeholders (including the government) etc are frankly rather hollow when we compare them with the experience already developed (or developed in jobs taken) by first degree and master's graduates in many professional occupations (heritage, business, research, marketing etc). In several sectors (including research), I found it difficult to provide impressive examples of meeting deadlines and working under pressure. Other skills such as teamwork, organising etc, I have developed to a much greater extent in roles other than the PhD. Doing the PhD lead me to many of these other roles (academic events organising etc), but just doing a PhD provides little apart from data analysis experience. Even this can be quite limited if PhD used just a few methods/techniques.

This leads to an observation (oft said) that many transferable skills can be, and need to be, developed AROUND doing the PhD. This is something the HE stakeholders need to point out more I think, rather than suggest just doing a PhD makes you so employable.

Quote From TreeofLife:
I think it's a hindrance to getting many jobs outside of academia.


I think one has to be prepared to start at the bottom of any sector. Some sectors value the PhD, but want to see suggested ability tested before promotion

I am a Teaching Assistant in Sec school, thinking of doing a PGCE. In TA interviews, no one has mentioned the PhD (not that it is relevant though). A few teachers can feel a bit intimidated, the students (in a school with no other PhDs) find it exotic, some find it inspiring, others couldn't care less, it's even held against me by some.

Thread: The value of PG publications

posted
20-May-14, 00:26
edited about 23 seconds later
Avatar for robinwestwales
posted about 3 years ago
Quote From Timmy:
You don't half go on a bit Huxley.

Bewildered/Robin where do I find the journal ranking please, I googled it but nothing happened.

Thanks.

This is a great tool, which is quite 'fun' really, type in your journals and can compare them (impact factor and more) as well as search for individual titles. Not entirely sure how accurate the figures are. http://www.scimagojr.com/compare.php?un=journals

Thread: The value of PG publications

posted
19-May-14, 21:51
Avatar for robinwestwales
posted about 3 years ago
[/quote]This is utter nonsense. Many of the people who have published in my journal are now established academics. Likewise, just about everyone who has worked on the editorial team of my journal is now an established academic. Yes you are snobbish AND don't know anything about postgraduate journals. Your field doesn't even have postgraduate journals. How many of your peers (2nd/3rd year PhD) are published in world-leading journals? How many of your peers have experience working on an editorial team of a journal? Have you ever organised an international conference rammed with world-leading academics and publishing experts? Have you copy-edited, peer-reviewed, web published an international journal? Have you ran training courses on peer-reviewing, book reviewing, and public speaking? Have you secured thousands in funding to deliver projects in postgraduate publishing?[/quote]

Thanks, I am hutzy998, my username changed for some reason as I forgot my password, I do not mean to cause personal offence. Several big journals in my field actually encourage submissions from Postgraduates, This is only to be welcomed. I am not in a good position personally when it comes to publications, which is making me think that I do not have what it takes for an academic career, within my department roughly half of completing PhD students will have at least 1 possibly 2 or 3 major articles. One recently had 5, another had 3. Another is writing an edited book with Routledge. I will only have 1 or 2. It is not unheard of to have 10 articles. I think the latter half of your comments are off topic and of course these sound amazing so well done. Postgraduate Journals obv have alot to give and one can publish great work in PG journals and they are rigorous as you have stressed however as I said earlier I do not quite see why one would want to publish here if there is a feeling that it could be put in a mainstream journal, and thinking beyond the REF, academic audience, there will be a bigger academic audience with a non PG Journal, although the public are unfortunately barred. Also if one lists publications on webpages/CV people see the journal it is in, the paper could be brilliant but it is in so and so journal and people will think ‘oh that’s not really a very important paper’ when infact it probably is but people turn their noses up at it because of where it is. This is something that should not happen but it does and maybe there is a reason behind it. Cheers.

Thread: Can I go on with just a pass masters degree

posted
28-Mar-11, 19:55
Avatar for robinwestwales
posted about 6 years ago
I would take a look at what the specific requirements are for the Merit (and distinction) grade, If you are on a Taught MSc at Birmingham, to get a Merit grade you need to achieve three hurdles, 1, av at least 55 in taught elements (120credits); 2, average at least 55 in the 60 credit research element (dissertation) and 3, average at least 60% overall. Not achieving any one of these 3 hurdles will not warrant the grade. For more info take a look at the regs, http://www.as.bham.ac.uk/legislation/docs/regulations_part7.pdf

Thread: Who is applying for 2011?

posted
23-Dec-10, 21:55
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posted about 7 years ago
I have composed my (Arts) proposal for 2011 entry, thankfully I knew my potential sup from undergrad and he was very keen for me to do a phd so we bounced ideas off which took about 2 months and then about 2 weeks to write a proper proposal which he straight off offered to edit(!). I did a human geography degree (2009) but then took a master's in urban planning and at a different university (2010), and now want to move back to my 'home' subject and uni. I was a bit stupid i think last year not applying for a PhD (I was a bit busy with Master's work) which means that I will be spending the next 9 months 'out of learning'. This may be a good thing as taking a year off provides some breathing space although I hope I don't turn 'mad', I really really really want to start my PhD now and as someone said;

quote]. I secretly think that all of us who wish to take this sort of research, writing, exploration journey must in part be obsessive thinkers....you know the thoughts go round and round and round like a hamster on a wheel![/quote
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