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strawberrygirl 1 star member
Monday, 23 August 2010 at 8:40pm
Saturday, 25 March 2017 at 11:12am
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Thread: Viva outcomes: major corrections, minor corrections, revise and resubmit

posted
25-Mar-17, 11:25
edited about 4 minutes later
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posted about 1 month ago
Hi all, thank you so much for all your answers. Your answers highlight how much variation there is between universities in terms of the viva. For example, Ian (Mackem-Beefy)'s post shows that major corrections and revise and resubmit can be the same thing. But where I am studying they are different. It seems that the difference between minor and major corrections is a bit arbitrary? But, as several of you say, it seems that as soon as corrections start involving quite extensive rewriting, rather than relatively surface level corrections, that major corrections come into play. Thanks Gwen86 for suggesting that some elements of an unclear argument might mean minor. And well done for defending your thesis so well despite the missing chapter. You must have been very happy with the outcome.

I've had a look at a book this week by Peter Smith, about the viva. It's really helpful - if anyone has their viva coming up (or even if you haven't submitted) it's well worth a look. I have found it really helpful and am already feeling more positive and less fearful about the viva. I'm trying to think less about possible outcomes and more about how to describe my work and its contribution and the influences on it.

And yes thanks all for commenting on my submission! It didn't really feel like a moment to celebrate as I was unhappy with what I submitted.

Did anyone else find reading their thesis afterwards really difficult? I still haven't been able to read mine - obviously I need to do so as my viva is not far away now.

Thread: Viva outcomes: major corrections, minor corrections, revise and resubmit

posted
18-Mar-17, 16:50
edited about 21 seconds later
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posted about 1 month ago
Hi all... I wondered if anyone has come across a clear description of the differences between major corrections, minor corrections and, revise and resubmit, as possible viva outcomes. I've looked at several places online (including this forum and my own university's guidelines) and have found very little information about how academics decide whether to award major or minor corrections (or even revise and resubmit). I've been re-reading my thesis since I submitted it several weeks ago and feel very unhappy about it. I've found, not only some basic errors and stylistic mistakes (in formatting etc), but I can also see that my argument is weak and unclear in places. It would be great to have some clarity on how examiners decide between the categories of minor/major/revise and resubmit. Does anyone know much about this? I'm in the UK.

Thread: Final year support thread

posted
08-Dec-16, 11:11
edited about 1 minute later
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posted about 4 months ago
Hi all, it's good to read people's posts here about having submitted recently. My final deadline is in just over two months. I still have half of one chapter to write from scratch plus the Intro and Conclusion. I also need to tidy up and edit my other chapters. It's all feeling a bit impossible at the moment and I'm struggling a bit with anxiety which is making things difficult. Did anyone else find that they were doing a lot of their writing so last minute? I forgot to add that like others here I feel sick of my topic and my thesis.I'm not convinced by my argument which feels weak and vague which doesn't help.

Is anyone else this close to submitting? It'd be good to hear how you'd doing.

Thread: Final year support thread

posted
27-Jan-16, 12:19
edited about 1 minute later
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posted about 1 year ago
Quote From Hugh:
Quote From strawberrygirl:
Hi all - I'm in my final year too. I posted on another thread so won't repeat it all here but I'm due to submit in four months and still have most of my thesis to write although I have early drafts of most of it. So I'm feeling quite overwhelmed.
I'd like to use this thread for checking in and reporting on progress.


Sounds good!

Do you have a plan in place with dates etc to hand in and finish by?

I've had a rubbish morning. I'm waiting for an email which is holding me back a bit. But I need to crack on. I find it easier and better to focus on one section/chapter at a time, so I'm avoiding starting to write up the other chapter, whilst I am waiting. Which I should do I suppose.


Hi Hugh - I've got dates in place but I don't know how realistic they are and I'm already behind on the first one! I am generally aiming to do one chapter at a time. But I am also going to try and write one of the chapters on one day a week over several weeks alongside working on the others as i don't have enough time to do them all chronologically. Not sure how that will work though. I changed my thesis quite significantly part way through and earlier chapters I wrote I am now not using at al which is why I'm behind.

Sorry to hear you are having a bad morning. One thing that really helped me when I was in a very bad place with writing was committing to a really small amount of time each day. Just an hour or even half an hour of writing. I would do that for a few days and then gradually get back up to a few hours.

Thread: Final year support thread

posted
27-Jan-16, 12:07
Avatar for strawberrygirl
posted about 1 year ago
Hi all - I'm in my final year too. I posted on another thread so won't repeat it all here but I'm due to submit in four months and still have most of my thesis to write although I have early drafts of most of it. So I'm feeling quite overwhelmed.
I'd like to use this thread for checking in and reporting on progress.

Thread: Writing up

posted
27-Jan-16, 12:01
edited about 49 seconds later
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posted about 1 year ago
Thanks for your messages of support, It's encouraging to know that others think it is feasible, even if difficult. I still feel uncertain but am going to keep going and see how it goes. I'm already behind on my first main chapter deadline.

I completely agree about breaking things into small chunks with manageable deadlines. One of the most difficult things I find is working out how long it will take to write certain sections. Chickpea - thanks for the mention of the book - I may give that a look.

I agree about getting supervisors to read chapters as you go along or there may not be time at the end to make all their suggested changes. Fortunately my supervisor is happy to read chapters as I go along. Monkey84 - I hadn't thought of it before but what you say,about supervisors being likely to pay more attention if they read chapter by chapter makes sense. I think you're right.

I'd definitely like to use this thread for writing up motivation and support if others are happy to do it! I've noticed that there is another one called final year support so maybe that one is better?

Thread: Writing up

posted
21-Jan-16, 23:28
edited about 1 minute later
Avatar for strawberrygirl
posted about 1 year ago
I'm starting a new thread as most of the writing up ones I found were very old.

I wanted to ask for some advice or support on the writing up process. Due to two major changes of direction during my humanities PhD I now have only four months to go before submission but still have a lot of the thesis to write. My thesis has five chapters including the introduction. I've almost finished a draft of one chapter and have a reasonable draft of another. Of the remaining two 'results' chapters I have only a very rough draft of one and no draft of the other although I do have bits of writing I can pull from now defunct chapter drafts. I also have a partial draft of the introduction.

I recently returned from an interruption - health related - and so need to work reasonable hours so as not to burn out.

Does this seem feasible or is it unrealistic to write up the remaining thesis in this time? I really want to avoid seeking an extension but also don't want to burn out and I know I only have so many good hours of writing in me each day.

Is anyone else writing up? How are you finding it?

Thread: Can I work part-time with a scholarship

posted
22-Jul-12, 09:43
edited about 27 seconds later
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posted about 5 years ago
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Hi

I have a similar scholarship. The idea of a scholarship is to allow you to work full time on your PhD without the need to work. The reality of course is different because it's almost impossible to live in London on the amount of money that it pays. I think most people do bits and pieces of extra work but I don't really know anyone who does more than, say, a day's worth / a couple of evenings a week unless they are registered part time. I do extra work but it's only occasional and pays well so I am lucky.

It seems like there are two issues. One is whether the BL job is feasible while doing a full time PhD and second, whether or not to tell your supervisor.

Firstly, I think working if you have a scholarship works best if you can do bits and pieces of flexible work e.g. writing / consultancy / teaching or something like bar work/ waitressing where you could alter the hours/do extra/fewer shifts as and when you need to. Generally I think it's easier to get away with it if the work is more informal/flexible. I think taking on a whole 2.5 day a week contract is a bit different. It could also mean you would be less available for meetings/seminars/supervisions etc but it depends on your university whether or not that would matter. I know that for me I definitely wouldn't be able to get away with that arrangement where I am. Maybe speak to others in the department/uni where you are going.

Presumably your job is during the week, meaning that you would only have 2.5 week days to do your research. I'm not sure what your subject is but am guessing it's humanities/social sciences (as most science based people seem to spend most week days in the lab and so wouldn't be going for this job). If it's something like English/History and you need archives/libraries your time in being able to access them will be very limited.

I think that trying to do this sort of a job and a full time PhD would be very hard and agree with what anon says below. I know people who struggle trying to get everything done when they have a part time contract and are registered for a part time Phd, never mind being registered full time. You would also have no life outside of work/research.

Secondly, re: telling your supervisor(s) - as a matter of principle I would advise telling your supervisor you may be working a bit. If you don't say anything it will be hanging over you and also make you look dishonest if it comes out. However it's up to you how much detail you go into.

I'm sure that if you told your supervisor the full details of the job you have been offered i.e. 2.5 days per week when the PhD funding is supposed to pay for 5 days a week they would not want you to do it. But I don't know if it's something the University can enforce. Maybe it's worth checking the terms and conditions. However, if it's at the BL I would think the risk of them finding out could be quite high.

It's a tough one. Good luck with deciding and congratulations on being offered the job - and the scholarship!

Thread: PhD without scholarship...Is it possible?

posted
30-May-12, 18:12
edited about 5 seconds later
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posted about 5 years ago
Hi BilboBaggins,
Thanks for clarifying what you meant. Yes, it seems to me that the things which most count for getting work afterwards are a good publications and conference paper list, teaching experience and a good thesis. I think it's true that some mature phd students are doing it for interest etc and not aiming to work in the field. From my own perspective I am a mature student doing a humanities PhD and do hope to work in academia/research once I finish.
So to Ancatdubh I would say that be really clear why you are doing the PhD. If you are coming straight from U/G or a masters and haven't a lot of work experience be really clear it's what you want to do if you are going to self fund it (I'd say the same for those who aren't self funding). I was planning to self-fund (through part time work) if I didn't get funding because I knew that it was definitely what I wanted to do.

Thread: PhD without scholarship...Is it possible?

posted
29-May-12, 10:07
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posted about 5 years ago
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======= Date Modified 29 May 2012 10:18:26 =======
[quote]Quote From BilboBaggins:

======= Date Modified 27 May 2012 13:50:24 =======
Self-funded part-time PhDs are incredibly common in the humanities in the UK, where there is very little funding. Often people fit these in alongside full-time or nearly full-time jobs. But they are not generally aiming for academic careers, but more doing the PhD for self reward. Some will go on to tutor part-time, for example evening classes or the OU. But few would go on to be full-time salaried academics. So the equation of whether it's worth it financially is a bit different.
===================================================
END OF QUOTE:

Hi I just wanted to add to the answers given already and also to comment on BilboBaggins comments. It definitely seems to be the case that in the humanities a very high proportion of PhD students are self funded. In the humanities (compared to the sciences) there are also many more mature and part time students, often people are juggling work and children and/or work and a phd. So in the humanities those who have a scholarship definitely seem to be in the significant minority (I asked a similar question recently on here).

I just wanted to pick up on BilboBaggins point that most self funded students don't intend to work in academia. I wonder why you draw the distinction between self funded and funded phds in terms of future jobs. Are you suggesting that fewer self-funded phds go onto employment in academia because they can't get jobs or because they never wanted academic jobs in the first place? I am not sure there is a significant distinction made by employers between whether someone is self-funded or not. Or am I wrong? Having funding often just means that you are fortunate to sit within current funding guidelines/priorities of that University or funding body, for whatever reason. So BB, forgetting for now those who don't intend to work in academia, are you suggesting that if someone's PhD is not funded then it is harder to find work afterwards? (I am not disagreeing just curious to know what you and others think).

Sorry but I can't work out how to write my bit outside of the section listed as a quote.


Thread: Scholarship, Part time work and tax

posted
04-May-12, 15:27
Avatar for strawberrygirl
posted about 5 years ago
As you are working your employer will continue to sort it out at their end. However, as you now have another income stream (albeit tax free) you may need to complete a self assessment as well.

Thread: Funding likelihood

posted
04-May-12, 15:18
Avatar for strawberrygirl
posted about 5 years ago
======= Date Modified 04 May 2012 15:22:12 =======
Thanks for replies to this.

It's so hard to get an idea of the situation overall. In the department where I am doing my PhD I would say that about 1 in 8 are funded. But in a university where I was based previously I would say it was a bit lower, say 1 in 12 or less.

I suppose a guess may be that 10% of humanities (English/History) PhDs are funded.

Thread: Funding likelihood

posted
28-Apr-12, 01:33
Avatar for strawberrygirl
posted about 5 years ago
Hi

Does anyone have any idea of the likelihood of getting funding for a phd in the humanities, say in English or History. I don't have much experience of different universities and so don't know what the norm is. What percentage of students tend to be funded. Also is there seen as being any difference between research council funding or funding directly from the university (assuming its for your own project - not a bigger project at the university? I have a friend who is hoping to start a phd next year, as a mature student, and I don't know what to advise in terms of funding.

Thanks
SG

Thread: Pls Help :(

posted
07-Feb-12, 18:25
Avatar for strawberrygirl
posted about 5 years ago
Sounds like a very difficult situation - trying to balance your PhD and also trying to make things work with your husband. Is there any way that he could move to be where you are based already? It seems a shame that you should have to give things up and move (again).

On another note; I wouldn't worry too much about or take into account what your supervisors will think. Although it's a huge issue for you this will be one thing on a list of many that they are dealing with. You could just explain that your relationship with your husband has been complicated and you think you need to move back home (if you do) to do your PhD.

Good luck with whatever you decide.

Thread: I am stuck for participants...can you help????

posted
17-Jan-12, 23:21
edited about 2 seconds later
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posted about 5 years ago
Thanks for replying to my comments.

One final point I meant to make and forgot was distinguishing between, e.g. a 17 year old boy/girl who has sex with a 15 year old boy/girl who is still (I believe) labelled as a (child) sex offender and say,a 50 year old man having sex with a young teenage girl. Many people would see a difference between the two, yet the questionnaire wouldn't capture this. it simplifies a complex issue.

I think some of the issues I raised highlight the weakness of questionnaires as a research method in dealing with these sorts of topics. It's not necessarily that your questionnaire is particularly problematic!
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