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Mark_B
Friday, 30 August 2013 at 12:52am
Monday, 7 October 2019 at 2:22pm
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page 1 of 10 recent posts

Thread: Studying without scholarship in Portugal

posted
13-Apr-15, 12:50
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by Mark_B
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posted about 4 years ago
Hi Sudeepkumar

As you're not an EU student you won't automatically be eligible to work in Portugal without a permit. That doesn't necessarily mean you won't be able to work at all - it just means that prospective employers may need to apply for a permit on your behalf.

You might be able to find more detailed information for Indian students over at the Portuguese Immigration service website: http://www.sef.pt/portal/V10/EN/aspx/page.aspx

There's also a general guide to studying a PhD in Portugal over at FindAPhD, with some information on student visas:http://www.findaphd.com/study-abroad/europe/phd-study-in-portugal.aspx





Hope that helps a bit,

Mark

Thread: Publishing thesis (English Lit) as individual chapters

posted
13-Apr-15, 10:29
edited about 42 seconds later
by Mark_B
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posted about 4 years ago
Hi Lucifer (now there's a greeting...)

I'm also in English Lit and have published a couple of pieces from my thesis during the PhD. I know what you mean re. the need to get that theoretical / methodological scaffold in place, but it seems to be par for the course. Most single-author folks I know tend to point their work at topics that author's work can speak to - might require a bit more re-writing, but could also increase exposure.

I guess another route might be to try for an edited collection? You'd need other scholars with work relevant to your author (or their network?) but it could be a way to stamp your name on the subject with something more substantial than an article and build from there. It seems that publishers are more likely to go for edited collections on 'niche' authors, though my experience of that is fairly anecdotal.

Thread: What is Proofreading actually?

posted
11-Apr-15, 12:26
edited about 8 seconds later
by Mark_B
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posted about 4 years ago
Hi folks

The forum isn't to be used for advertising purposes, this is true. A discussion of proof-reading in the context of postgraduate work / academic publication is fine, of course.

This isn't really the place to discuss proof-reading as a profession or general concept though. Unless someone's doing a PhD in proof-reading science. Linguistics, maybe? ;)

Thread: any advice?

posted
11-Apr-15, 11:20
edited about 2 seconds later
by Mark_B
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posted about 4 years ago
With respect to *answering* questions, well, it's natural to be nervous. After I gave my first couple of papers I sat praying that noone would ask me anything! You don't want that though - a question is pretty much always a good thing: it means someone cared about what you had to say and thought you were worth discussing it with.

It's easy to panic about that one horrible question from an evil professor who inexplicably decides to eat you alive in front of an audience. People may have their horror stories, but, honestly, I've *never* seen this happen and I've spoken at / attended an awful lot of events.

If you do get a question you're not prepared for, that's fine - and totally normal. After all, the questions are the one bit of a presentation you *can't* prepare for ;) I've tried jotting down answers to a few 'likely' questions before, but they never actually get asked.

If you think you might know the answer, take your time to formulate it. Noone expects you to be able to summon up everything related to your research in a couple of seconds. Looking like you're putting thought into an answer is a good thing.

If someone asks a question and you don't know the answer, it's OK to admit that. Say it's something you hadn't yet considered, or a stage in your research you hadn't reached and that you'll look into - thank the questioner for the suggestion and perhaps go and chat with them after the paper.

Hope that all helps a little bit! - Sure others will also have some advice.

Mark

Thread: any advice?

posted
11-Apr-15, 11:14
by Mark_B
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posted about 4 years ago
Hi Dottottung

I think everyone has these few conference nerves. I've presented more papers than I care to remember now and I still tense up a little before the time comes to give a talk. The following are tips from my experience (which is Humanities-based). I'm sure other folks here will be able to offer their own.

When it comes to *asking* questions, I tend to jot down a couple as the talk goes on. Sometimes I ask them in the Q/A, but quite often I'll go chat to the speaker afterwards - particularly if it's something I'd like to have a proper discussion about.

I'd really recommend this if you're a little nervous about drawing the attention of everyone else in the audience and would prefer to just chat with the speaker. In my experience they never mind this (some prefer it) - though it's polite to let them get a coffee / etc first!

Getting used to meeting and chatting with speakers in this way will probably boost your confidence when it comes to speaking up in the formal Q&A, but even if it doesn't, that's not a big deal: a conference in which all academic discussion was restricted to brief spurts of Q&A would be pretty bizarre (and boring).

Thread: Conference paranoia

posted
09-Apr-15, 14:43
edited about 2 minutes later
by Mark_B
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posted about 4 years ago
I'm in the Humanities myself and this isn't usually a problem - it's possible that someone might follow a research lead thrown up in a paper, but we don't tend to present data directly at conferences (we do have data sometimes ;))

What I have seen a few times is people citing presentations in their own subsequent work. It's not remarkably common, but it is a thing - MLA even have citation guidelines for it. On a more informal level, people quite often ask for copies of papers they've enjoyed or been intrigued by, which (one would hope) kind of precludes secretly ripping them off.

Having given quite a few conference presentations myself, I can safely say that, were anyone to nick my work I'd hunt them down with a big stick*.

*send them a very strongly worded email.

Thread: Starting your PhD

posted
07-Apr-15, 17:00
by Mark_B
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posted about 4 years ago
Hi Ckoszo

Your university should be able to let you know what its accommodation options are. Not all institutions will have housing set aside for postgraduates (and this may be prioritised for taught students) but it's worth asking. As an overseas student you may be prioritised - particularly if you get in touch with your university's international office.

EU students have the right to work in the UK alongside their studies. Jobs may be available in catering, library services, etc at your uni - some institutions even run 'job shops' to help students find this kind of work. Your best bet is to get in touch and see what's available.

There's also no reason why you can't find funding in subsequent years of a part-time PhD.

Hope that helps a wee bit - best of luck!

Mark

Thread: Commuting vs. Living Near Uni for PhD study

posted
20-Mar-15, 14:04
edited about 12 seconds later
by Mark_B
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posted about 4 years ago
I used to commute from Gloucestershire to South Wales as a PhD student. This included leaving the house at 6AM and driving over the Severn Bridge to teach a 9AM seminar on Victorian Literature twice a week. I made damned sure those students cared about Tennyson ;)

... I'd agree with some of what other folks here have said. You *can* get on with a lot work involved in a PhD project remotely (in certain disciplines, at least) but there's also a lot to be said for getting involved with the research community around your university - workshops, socials, etc.

Thread: UK Chancellor announces loans for PhDs (yes, really)

posted
19-Mar-15, 15:21
by Mark_B
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posted about 4 years ago
Hi Ian

The statement you've quoted is based on the Budget documents - part of the consultation process will involve working with 'research councils, universities and industry to examine how best to design them [the new loans] so that they compliment existing funding streams and continue to support the most excellent research.'

There's plenty we could extrapolate from that (and from other parts of the announcement) but it looks like we'll have to wait for the details.

Speaking *entirely for myself* here, I agree that a broad shift from public funding to personal debt would be concerning.

Thread: UK Chancellor announces loans for PhDs (yes, really)

posted
19-Mar-15, 13:37
edited about 54 seconds later
by Mark_B
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posted about 4 years ago
Yes, subject areas aren't specified either - for that claim (or, ineed, for the loans).

The Masters loans are currently entering a consultation phase. It's possible that more info on these research loans will emerge from that, but the legislation doesn't look like it's going to go through in this parliament.

Thread: UK Chancellor announces loans for PhDs (yes, really)

posted
19-Mar-15, 12:48
by Mark_B
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posted about 4 years ago
Difficult to say until more info' becomes available.

The budget documents do confirm that loans can be taken on in addition to existing funding. Though that may beg a few questions itself.

Thread: UK Chancellor announces loans for PhDs (yes, really)

posted
19-Mar-15, 11:56
by Mark_B
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posted about 4 years ago
Hi folks

Not sure if any of you spent your lunch-break watching the UK Budget announcement yesterday (I don't recommend it) but you may have heard that the Chancellor slipped in a little announcement about student loans for PhDs.

Very little info available so far, but we've put together a primer on what there is over at FindAPhD:
What do you guys think of this? Could be a pretty fundamental shift in the postgraduate research landscape.

Thread: Advice on Starting Again

posted
17-Mar-15, 13:26
edited about 24 seconds later
by Mark_B
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posted about 4 years ago
Hi A_Neves

If you're very keen to return to the same programme, I'd at least get in touch with your former supervisor. You can explain your situation (or as much of it as you're comfortable with - you're not obliged to disclose a condition to your institution if you don't wish to) and explain your plans for resuming the project. If those are clear and well thought-out your supervisor may well be happy to re-accept you. If they aren't, you've not lost anything more than the time it takes to write an email?

Others may have more advice, but I'd certainly give getting back in touch a shot.

Mark

Thread: Students with experiences of PG study with disability / chronic illness

posted
16-Mar-15, 11:54
by Mark_B
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posted about 4 years ago
Thanks anyway EnglishNinja

Hopefully the advice will be useful to students in your situation once its put together. In the meantime, there are actually some very helpful threads on the forum - with supportive advice and perspective from the community here.

If you do decide you'd like to contribute anything in future, you're very welcome to get in touch with me.

Thread: Reached a low point - any advice?

posted
12-Mar-15, 14:56
by Mark_B
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posted about 4 years ago
Hi Westie

I'm sure others will have some helpful words for you, but I'll jump in right away and encourage you to keep your head up.

By the sounds of it you're actually doing really well on your Masters. It's natural to feel down about a poor result, but everyone gets them. The important thing is that your feedback has cleared up the how and the why. I had a poor result on a module for my Masters and found it really helpful to chat with my tutor about it - he said, quite rightly, that the degree was a learning experience and not to worry over one individual assessment.

I'd also suggest that other folks on your course may not actually be as serene as they appear. If you're feeling stressed, other students will seem calm in contrast, but you can't see inside their heads (unless your Masters is in Psychology, maybe...).

I guess you're gearing up for the dissertation stage of your programme now? That's a very different phase to the taught modules. You've got space to plan and reflect on a longer project. It's an important part of your degree, but, once you get into a good rhythm it can actually be quite a calm and methodical one.

And hey - if you've made it halfway, you're halfway there. That's an achievement already - regardless of one disappointing result.

I hope that helps a bit - sure others will also have advice and encouragement.

Mark
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