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Mark_B
Friday, 30 August 2013 at 12:52am
Monday, 7 October 2019 at 2:22pm
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page 1 of 10 recent posts

Thread: Students with experiences of PG study with disability / chronic illness

posted
23-Jan-15, 15:25
by Mark_B
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posted about 4 years ago
Thanks HazyJane - That's an excellent resource and certainly one we'll be directing readers to.

It's great to see so much existing support for these issues - I've been very encouraged by it whilst researching the topic.

Thread: Students with experiences of PG study with disability / chronic illness

posted
22-Jan-15, 16:36
edited about 1 day later
by Mark_B
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posted about 4 years ago
Cheers to those who have got in touch with me so far.

There's still time if anyone else would like to be involved - you're very welcome to contact me anonymously using the forum, or via the email address in the post above.

Thread: Students with experiences of PG study with disability / chronic illness

posted
15-Jan-15, 12:58
edited about 2 seconds later
by Mark_B
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posted about 4 years ago
Hi Folks

I'm Mark and, as some of you may know, I look after the advice and information content over at the Forum's sister sites, FindAMasters and FindAPhD. I'm also a PhD student myself, wrapping up an English Lit' thesis part-time.

Anyway - we're currently doing a little bit of research into postgraduate study with a disability or chronic illness - with the aim of producing a summary of some helpful advice re. common conditions and directing students towards other sources of information (including the very helpful folks who hang out here).

With that in mind, I was wondering if any of you would like to share some experiences or advice with this topic? It would be great to offer future students some tips from other postgraduates. Any level of postgraduate study is fine and I'd be happy to include contributions anonymously if preferred.

You can get in touch with me using the personal message function on the forum, or by emailing me via mbennett [at] findauniversity.com.

Thanks in advance!

Mark

Thread: FindAPhD and FindAMasters Advice Content - Any Suggestions?

posted
12-Nov-14, 11:15
edited about 23 seconds later
by Mark_B
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posted about 5 years ago
Thanks for the feedback - it's very much appreciated.

In fact, one of our sister sites, www.postgraduatefunding.com, lists a wide range of scholarships and other funding packages available to postgraduate students.

If you're looking for advice on finding funding in specific countries you can check out the country guides in the Study Abroad sections on FindAMasters and FindAPhD - all of these provide information and online contact details for major funders in individual countries.

Many thanks!

Mark

Thread: Have You Studied Abroad for a Masters or PhD in Germany?

posted
10-Jul-14, 10:45
edited about 2 seconds later
by Mark_B
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posted about 5 years ago
Thanks to all those who've been in touch so far - we're still keen to hear from other students with experience of postgraduate study in Germany, so do send a message (or reply here) if you'd like to be involved with this survey.

Thread: Have You Studied Abroad for a Masters or PhD in Germany?

posted
26-Jun-14, 10:57
edited about 2 seconds later
by Mark_B
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posted about 5 years ago
Hi Cocobrack

For the time being we're just interested in learning about students' experiences of postgraduate study in Germany, but we'll be looking at other countries in due course.

Thread: FindAPhD and FindAMasters Advice Content - Any Suggestions?

posted
13-Jun-14, 12:07
edited about 8 seconds later
by Mark_B
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posted about 5 years ago
You may be aware of the different postgraduate study guides and advice articles on FindAPhD.com and FindAMasters.com.

You can see some examples of our Masters advice content here:
We hope you find them useful, but we'd also love to hear from the community here if you've any suggestions for future content or advice you can't find on our sites.

You can get in touch by replying to this thread, or by sending me a personal message.

Thanks!

Mark

Thread: Have You Studied Abroad for a Masters or PhD in Germany?

posted
13-Jun-14, 12:04
edited about 2 minutes later
by Mark_B
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posted about 5 years ago
FindAMasters.com and FindAPhD.com are looking to enhance our guides to postgraduate study abroad with information from students who have direct experience of university systems and student life in different countries.

Right now, we're looking to get in touch with students who have studied in Germany.

So, if you've studied (or are studying) for a Masters or PhD in Germany, we'd love to hear about your experiences and perhaps include some of them on our sites.

If you'd like to get involved and help future students considering study abroad, you can get in touch by sending me a personal message here. It would be great if you could also let me know which university you were based at and what your programme of study was.

Many thanks,

Mark

Thread: Part time PhD

posted
20-Jan-14, 14:08
edited about 26 seconds later
by Mark_B
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posted about 5 years ago
Hi gc1

I'm in the final stretches of a part-time PhD myself and have tried both approaches due to a shift in registration part-way through.

These days I live in the same city as my institution and can be "on campus" quite easily when I want to be, though I tend to do most of my research in a home office (I'm in Humanities, so labs aren't an issue). However, when I started I lived in Gloucestershire whilst registered at a university in South Wales. I still managed to get plenty done, but I felt very little connection with my department and it was easy to get side-tracked if I wasn't careful.

Teaching was also a challenge when I started it. I was 'lucky' enough to have charge of a whole cohort for a core module during one year, but this meant two big commutes and a 5am alarm clock on one morning!

On the other hand, there's something to be said for having the ability to find space apart from the research from time to time - that's healthy, I think, and easier to do if you're not living right on top of it.

Best of luck with it

Mark

Thread: LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing Hoax

posted
10-Sep-13, 16:44
by Mark_B
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posted about 6 years ago
Hi Rina

Myself a few fellow students at my institution were also emailed by LAP a month or ago - clearly a bulk-mailing, with my surname and forename comically misaligned. I don't think their operation is a hoax as such - they probably will publish a thesis on a print-on-demand basis, but their offer isn't based on any assessment of the recipient's work and is effectively akin to vanity publishing, with the added risk that you lose the rights to publish "properly" elsewhere. I'd be pretty wary, but there was a bit of readily available feedback / discussion of them when I googled.

Thread: external examiner question

posted
10-Sep-13, 11:33
by Mark_B
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posted about 6 years ago
In my field (Humanities) supervisors typically advise on suitable externals, though it remains the candidate's prerogative to select their own. It's also a decision that emerges from the way the research project has developed, rather than informing its direction from the outset. That may not be true of all fields or specialisms though.

Thread: Excelling at MA English Studies

posted
09-Sep-13, 22:20
edited about 24 seconds later
by Mark_B
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posted about 6 years ago
I think nerves are perfectly natural - it's a new and (so far) unfamiliar experience. Come Christmas it'll all be very normal to you. For now you're better off focussing on how exciting and interesting the experience is going to be!

My advice with the reading would be to get a head start on core texts if you can. This is a nice way of getting comfortable with your materials and also leaves you time to re-read or read around those primary materials when you eventually reach them in your course. Whatever you read before the course can almost be thought of as a bonus, so relax, enjoy it, see what you think about it and learn what interests you. If you're doing some secondary reading in advance then I probably would pick something recommended by a module guide (or a tutor - I'm sure they'd be happy to answer a quick email asking for suggestions). In terms of scope, I'd stick with what interests you for now - learning what interests and engages you as a more specialised scholar is part of what studying for an Masters is about. You're also better off reading one thing and really understanding it than trying to force down ten things that leave you confused - that's still true at PhD level, I find!

Thread: Excelling at MA English Studies

posted
09-Sep-13, 19:06
by Mark_B
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posted about 6 years ago
Hi Again!

Re. scholarship: essentially you'll want to demonstrate that you've read up on the subject area and are aware of the major positions that have been taken on it. These are usually very obvious once you begin researching an area, particularly on a taught course where your tutors will recommend secondary reading. Key sources / studies will usually reference each other too, so the "paper trail" is easy to follow . A really good MA answer will then comprehend these existing positions and situate its own original thinking in relation to them. This is part of the way a humanities MA teaches you to become an effective researcher within an existing field of scholarship.

Does your course include a core module or two on research methods? If so, you'll be introduced to processes for effective research. One of the tasks I was given on my MA involved compiling an annotated bibliography on a topic of my choice. This meant reading an awful lot of journal articles and monographs then recording them as MLA style citations with 3-4 sentence summaries. A tough exercise at first, but a really helpful one.

Re. questions: you're quite likely to be asked to develop your own essay topic and agree it with a tutor in advance when the time comes for assessment. You'll get a lot of guidance therefore, so don't worry too much about this in advance. As cliche'd as it is to say, the best questions to ask are ones you've developed an enthusiasm for during a module - I usually found myself developing an interest in something after a few weeks and keeping it in mind as the course proceeded - shaping some of my approaches to subsequent primary material / secondary reading accordingly. Not miles apart from a BA really!

Key to both questions is effective organisation and note-making. No substitute for it!

Hope that helps a bit and still happy to chat - keynote is that you should get lots of guidance from tutors once your course gets rolling!

Mark

Thread: PhD about Roman Catholic Church Law

posted
05-Sep-13, 11:09
edited about 18 seconds later
by Mark_B
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posted about 6 years ago
Not my area at all, but my cousin completed a PhD on medieval Canon Law at Cambridge. Her name's Danica Summerlin and she's currently post-docing here:

http://www.kuttner-institute.jura.uni-muenchen.de/index_e.htm

Thread: Excelling at MA English Studies

posted
04-Sep-13, 13:40
by Mark_B
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posted about 6 years ago
Hi Datefillets

I'm a current PhD in English Lit, having taken an MA in a lit specialism a few years ago - both at UK institutions.

First up, I think it's easy to forget that postgrad study is still a learning process. Noone's expected to walk onto a course, instantly start producing distinction-level work and then just go through the motions for a year and graduate (if anyone is able to do that, I'd like to borrow their brain for the rest of my doctorate). Whatever level you start at, you'll get better - I picked up a distinction on my MA, but I didn't get a distinction on the first paper I wrote for it.

Feedback is an important part of that process, so make sure you know how to access your tutors and make the most of their expertise, advice, etc. Distance learning may make this seem trickier, but your course should be set up in a way to mitigate that.

As for producing distinction-level work, that's also a conversation to have with instructors. In a nut-shell, a lot of the step-up from BA to MA (in Literature, at least) concerns research. A good BA essay will be able to identify one or two relevant critical sources, apply and perhaps interrogate them. A really good MA essay will have a much more complete sense of the contours of a relevant critical field and try to take its arguments forward within that. That's part of the learning process too - you'll almost certainly be given some research training and your teaching will encourage you to employ that.

Hope that helps a bit - happy to try and answer any more specific questions.

Good luck!

Mark
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