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Nesrine87
Friday, 14 November 2014 at 9:52am
Monday, 5 November 2018 at 2:16pm
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page 1 of 9 recent posts

Thread: No response to request for article feedback - what next?

posted
21-Oct-15, 09:15
edited about 20 seconds later
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posted about 4 years ago
Hi all,

A minor but annoying problem. I've written an article (6000w) which I need some feedback on...on the off-chance I'm talking complete and utter rubbish!

I've emailed a respected guy in my department who is not my supervisor but is very well-placed to comment since the subject is from work I did a while ago, and more up his alley. We haven't worked together loads but my department is small and relatively friendly.

I completely understand how busy academics are but I made it very clear that if he didn't have time to read it, I'd like him to say so. I sent the email three weeks ago and he hasn't responded. I don't know anyone else that I can comfortably email with an article draft.

Should I assume he's not gonna respond, or keep waiting? Or should I send him another email? I'm hesitant to bother him because he's not my supervisor and he has no obligation to me...but at the same time, I'm a student and I need help! I could just submit the article for peer review but I've already had a couple of rejections and a little bit of my soul dies each time...Any suggestions on what to say/do would be very much appreciated.

Thread: Feeling my anxiety returning...

posted
06-Oct-15, 18:12
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 4 years ago
Hi Mark and chickpea,
Thanks for your replies. It's nice to know I'm not alone. I'm just trying to focus and not get bogged down by competition/politics (after all, the thesis is kinda the main part of the experience!) but it would be nice to have a few like-minded friends around.
N x

Thread: Feeling my anxiety returning...

posted
06-Oct-15, 11:01
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 4 years ago
Just need to get this off my chest. Started my third year and thought I'd be able to be cool like a cucumber by now but I'm already feeling stressed even though nothing's really happened! Spent the last year living far away from my uni and really enjoyed it. Felt quite 'out of the loop' but seeing as I have no good friends here, it wasn't a great loss. Now I'm back in this pathologically competitive and hyper-critical environment. Every time I see an email from my sup, I feel like my heart has dropped into my stomach.

Every time I see a fellow PhD student give a lecture or publish something (no matter how minor), it makes me feel really inadequate. I've done a few things myself but - probably like a lot of neurotic students - I downplay my own achievements and magnify those of others. I feel like I've tried reaching out to fellow students but I haven't found anyone on my 'wavelength'. Also, conversation invariably revolves around academics yet no-one actually wants to talk about the elephant in the room of PhD progress. All of my close (pre-PhD) friends live in other places so I only get to see/talk to them every few weeks.

I know I need to suck it up but part of me wants to build a bedsheet fort in a corner and stay there for the rest of the year...apart from whining to my husband, this forum is my only outlet so thanks for listening!

Thread: How do you deal with jealousy issue at your cohort?

posted
02-Oct-15, 16:28
edited about 28 seconds later
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 4 years ago
This is very tricky. I think RinaL has a point but I personally would be reluctant to involve my supervisor *unless* you were feeling properly harassed, bullied or discriminated against. My supervisor wouldn't consider it any of their business. Obviously you understand your situation better than I do. If you feel like it's more than someone being a bit difficult then by all means, make a formal complaint.

Her actions signal a profound lack of maturity and self-esteem. She may have some tough personal issues that she's working through...or she could just be a nasty piece of work! How well do you actually know her? It sounds a bit cheesy but maybe it's worth getting to know her one-on-one? Ignore that if you've already tried!

Are you studying sciences or humanities? I'm asking because if it's the latter, it might be easier to just find a better place to work. I'm not in the sciences but I understand that there's more teamwork involved...so maybe it is important that you two find a way of getting along.

Obviously, in principle you shouldn't have to move because you have every right to work there but is it worth the time and effort to start a war with her? She could get even worse...or she could totally back down. There's no way of knowing. You can't control other people. You can only control your response. And the best revenge would be to not let her affect your work in any way, be successful in your PhD, and watch her crash and burn :P

Thread: Starting 3rd year

posted
02-Oct-15, 16:17
edited about 20 seconds later
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posted about 4 years ago
Welcome tamecat! Best of luck with hitting your deadline. FYI, I've resorted to drinking invisible tea in the past in order to avoid the barista death stare.

Thanks for the advice, Chococake. I'm quite worried about morning sickness seeing as I get dizzy standing up too fast...

But "I am going to end up spending more time researching the country then actually spending time on holiday" make me laugh as I've actually spent the past week planning my itinerary down to the minute instead of proper work. Hopefully it's all out of my system now! Eugh, back to MS Word I trudge...

Thread: Suggestions - who to read an article draft (arts and humanities)?

posted
02-Oct-15, 16:09
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 4 years ago
Thanks! Might be that my poor hubby is forced to comment on it despite being a 'lay' person. Sometimes I think 'PhD widow/ers' should get a qualification at the end too...

Thread: Suggestions - who to read an article draft (arts and humanities)?

posted
02-Oct-15, 15:08
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 4 years ago
Hi Eds,
Thanks a lot for the offer/suggestion! I'm a bit reluctant to send my work to someone or post it online because my subject is extremely niche. At the end of the day, I don't know who I'm sending my work to, and I'm quite paranoid about preserving my online anonymity. This is the only space I have to vent/ask questions/be indiscreet without feeling anxious. Sorry if that sounds a bit silly...it's just how I prefer it. But thanks again for the offer. I've just found that my uni runs writing workshops so that might be a good place to start.

Thread: Suggestions - who to read an article draft (arts and humanities)?

posted
02-Oct-15, 13:09
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 4 years ago
Hello all,

I've re-drafted my masters dissertation (which had an excellent grade) into a cogent 8000-word article and tailored it towards a specific and respected journal. I wrote the dissertation 6 years ago and have half-heartedly tried to get it published in less well-known journals a couple of times with no luck. This time, I've taken the re-draft seriously and think I have a good shot.

However, I'd like to get some feedback from experienced academics but getting time from them, unsurprisingly, is like getting a trickle of blood from an extremely large and intimidating stone. I've sent it to one member of my department who is not my supervisor, because the subject is quite different from my thesis topic and it's in his wheelhouse. He hasn't yet replied (it's been a couple of weeks) and I'm nervous to email him asking what's happening because he's under no obligation to help me.

I don't know who else to send the draft to. I don't know anyone else who has the time/inclination to help me. I'm too embarrassed to send it to other PhD students I know. Should I just send it off to the journal and hope for the best?

Thread: Starting 3rd year

posted
01-Oct-15, 11:01
edited about 6 seconds later
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 4 years ago
A 3rd-year support thread is a great idea! Late to the party as usual...but since term hasn't started, I'll consider myself early still :)

Feeling relatively upbeat but I'm sure that feeling will crash and burn once I get feedback. It seems masochistic to spend so much time and effort on producing writing that you're (hopefully) proud of, only to get back pages after pages of red critique. A necessary evil...sigh. That's assuming I ever actually get a reply from my sups who have managed to successfully ignore me for the past three months.

Have (stupidly?) booked a two-week vacation for next April, both as something to be excited about and to work towards, and as a last hurrah before we try to start a family. I keep trying to remember that there is a life outside the write-up!

Thread: 3rd Year PhD - still worth doing an internship?

posted
21-Sep-15, 11:33
edited about 1 second later
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 4 years ago
Hi all,

Just started my third year and I'm wondering whether it's worth spending one day a week doing an internship. I think I could manage it with my current workload, and could always stop after a few months if it's too much. I've done a couple of similar internships before I started the PhD but not directly related to my current academic field. It's a small field so relevant internship opportunities are few.

My supervisor has made it clear in the past that she thinks it's better to stay in academia and I would tend to agree (for various reasons I won't go into right now) but I'm keeping my options open because of the depressing state of the academic job market. Also, the institution I'd send my internship application to has informal links with my academic department so I don't think my volunteering there would seem too weird to the academics. I've heard anecdotal stories of entry-level positions going to longer-term interns so I'd be keen to be in the right place at the right time.

Is it worth it though? Or would it seem strange for a doctoral student to be doing fairly basic work? I don't mind doing stuff like that (it might even be a nice break from my research). I'm also a little worried that they might turn me down and I'll be embarrassed if people found out I applied and got rejected.

Thanks in advance for your thoughts.

Thread: career in academia and getting pregnant - the right time

posted
18-Jun-15, 17:07
edited about 14 seconds later
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 4 years ago
Hi Annabelle,

As someone who's not a mum, but is constantly thinking about the PhD/baby conundrum, I wanted to share with you how I feel. I contributed to this same thread before and have done some thinking since then.

I'm turning 30 next year and am hoping to finish my PhD at the end of next year. For me, the bottom line is that if you really feel the urge to have a baby, just go for it. As another poster said, only you know when you and your partner are ready.

For me personally, my husband and I really want children but neither of us have the strong urge to have them in the next year or so. We talk about babies A LOT but we do like it being just the two of us for a bit longer. I worry about it getting more difficult to conceive with every passing year but I'm not about to rush into having a baby for the sake of my potentially elderly ovaries. At the end of the day, it's your choice. I feel like women in academia are already under so much pressure, it's a shame that we're made to feel so neurotic about a natural process! (not calling you neurotic, more calling myself that)

You can't know what's going to happen in the future, either with conception, pregnancy, the baby, or your career. Whatever you decide, you made that decision in good faith with the knowledge you had available at the time. Don't have any regrets, or become 'Captain Hindsight'! (what I call my friends who say "oh you should have done this...")

Best of luck, and keep us updated!

Thread: Can I email a journal editor about an article idea?

posted
18-Jun-15, 16:27
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 4 years ago
Quote From MeaninginLife:
Editors usually know their reviewers very well.
If they do not want your paper, they may send it to certain 'group' of reviewers…
Be careful when you write to them. :-)


Really?? Peer-review is supposed to be anonymous, so you mean they send it to someone who is hard to impress? I've never heard of that happening, but maybe I'm very naive!

Thread: Can I email a journal editor about an article idea?

posted
16-Jun-15, 16:58
edited about 6 seconds later
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 4 years ago
Okay, thanks a lot, Clupea! I figured it was a sensible thing to do but sometimes there are weird unspoken rules of etiquette in academia that I'm unaware of...

Thread: Can I email a journal editor about an article idea?

posted
16-Jun-15, 12:12
edited about 21 seconds later
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 4 years ago
Hi all,

I'd like to submit an article for peer-review but the paper needs a lot of editing and re-formatting to tailor it for a specific journal (it's based on an essay I wrote several years ago). Before I do all of this, is it normal/desirable to email the journal editor with a very short (2-3 sentences max) description of the article and ask whether they'd be interested in the topic? I haven't had any prior contact with the editor. This is for a humanities subject.

Thanks!

Thread: Holiday after conference

posted
21-May-15, 12:08
edited about 26 seconds later
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 4 years ago
Yes, it's all fun and games until you find mouse poop on your hostel bed! Then you start wondering why you ever left home :P

That's probably less likely to happen in America though - have fun, Ceruse!
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