Overview of Nesrine87

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Nesrine87
Friday, 14 November 2014 at 9:52am
Monday, 5 November 2018 at 2:16pm
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Thread: Changing scope of conference presentation

posted
21-May-15, 08:33
edited about 29 seconds later
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 4 years ago
Bilbo - Thanks for your comment. Yes it is 30 mins. They specified this to allow for more depth than the usual conference paper.
Chickpea - Thanks for your suggestion, I'll try to do that. Hope they'll reply to my email!

Thread: Holiday after conference

posted
20-May-15, 17:24
edited about 14 seconds later
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 4 years ago
It should be fine as long you're not asking the uni to pay for extra accommodation/food/domestic travel. I've found my uni/dept to be pretty relaxed about these sorts of things. After all, the plane ticket will cost pretty much the same. I often take a few days sightseeing when I go abroad for uni business. I just pay for the extra days out of my own pocket. My supervisor even said it's one of the few perks of being an academic!

Thread: Changing scope of conference presentation

posted
20-May-15, 17:18
edited about 18 seconds later
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 4 years ago
Hi everyone,

I'm presenting at my first conference in just under a month. I've submitted an abstract which basically covers my whole thesis topic - my aim was originally to present a brief overview of my thesis material and discuss some preliminary thoughts as I'm in the pre-writing up stage.

I've done a very very rough draft and I think trying to present all my key material in 30 minutes is technically possible but I won't be able to go into very much depth...or at least, people will maybe start to switch off if I'm forced to cover a lot of stuff quite superficially...it's hard to gauge because I'm inexperienced and it's a somewhat interdisciplinary conference. I don't know how familiar the audience will be - there will be some stuff they know way more than I do, like historical details and theory but I know my material more than anyone else (hopefully!)

So, can I just talk about the first half of my material, i.e. the earlier period? I think I can get into the topic a bit more and present it as a coherent narrative. Do I need to check with the conference organiser first? My focus isn't changing, just the scope.

Thanks for your help!

Thread: Should I bother trying to write/publish a journal article?

posted
13-May-15, 11:04
edited about 5 seconds later
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 4 years ago
It's unlikely seeing as it was quite a few years ago now, and she strongly implied in emails exchanged after I finished the course that she wasn't that keen on maintaining correspondence with me...her specific field of study is very different from what I was doing in the thesis but there was a little overlap. To be honest, I wrote the whole thing without any feedback from her whatsoever. I know a couple of academics who will hopefully be willing to give feedback.

Thread: Should I bother trying to write/publish a journal article?

posted
12-May-15, 11:44
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 4 years ago
Thanks Doc. I've also decided in the meantime to give publishing my MA thesis one more go. I did it 5 years ago now and it's not really related to my current work (same field but it's a wide field) but it got a really good grade. I've had it rejected a few times from journals so I guess I just need to be persistent and tailor it more towards a specific journal.

Thread: Should I bother trying to write/publish a journal article?

posted
11-May-15, 15:47
edited about 6 seconds later
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 4 years ago
I was talking about publishable papers but the info about conference papers was useful too!

Bilbo, thanks for the advice as well. I think I might try to brainstorm a few article ideas over the next few months and then start drafting in between chapters, as Mark said - that way, hopefully I'll be in the writing frame of mind and getting an article together shouldn't be as difficult as it seems right now. The whole thing really stresses me out but I guess everyone's in the same boat.

Thread: Should I bother trying to write/publish a journal article?

posted
11-May-15, 12:36
edited about 27 seconds later
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 4 years ago
Quote From Eds:
Publish or perish...


Well that's made the choice clear I suppose! :P

Thanks for your advice, Mark. As you say, I guess it's down to workload. I think I'll try to write a very rough draft before telling my supervisor about it so at least I can say "look, I've done something...and it could actually be good!" before she has the chance to dismiss me.

As a side-question, I'd be interested to know how forumites (esp current students) go about writing papers - dedicating a big chunk of time, only once or twice a week, or even a little bit every day?

Thread: Should I bother trying to write/publish a journal article?

posted
11-May-15, 09:31
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 4 years ago
Hi all,

I'm a second-year humanities PhD without any publications yet apart from a book review in a respectable journal. There seems to be a lot of emphasis on getting published before the PhD is over but I'm never really sure if that's more for sciences or humanities or maybe both. Other students in my department have had stuff handed to them from their supervisors which makes me quite jealous to be honest, though that stuff isn't peer-reviewed...it does make their academia.edu profiles look way more impressive though!

I study historical material, and have some stuff that is interesting but probably won't end up in my thesis for reasons of scope. The material could make for a good journal article but I'm hesitant because I know that it would take a *lot* of work to get a high-quality article written, and my supervisor would probably be discouraging only because she wants me to focus my energy on getting my thesis done. For those wondering, I don't want to publish stuff from my thesis because it'll severely reduce the chances of a book deal and quite a few PhDs in my small field do manage to get book deals.

Is it worth putting in the time and effort or should I leave it until I'm done drafting my thesis next year? I would probably aim to write 6-7000 words inc footnotes. I thought it could be a productive distraction from the PhD work sometimes...but I'd be worried to talk to my supervisor about it, and if she isn't encouraging, possibly trying to it on my own (I would almost certainly need her feedback!)

Thanks for your help.

Thread: Supervisor Without a PhD

posted
11-May-15, 09:20
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 4 years ago
Hi Jcc,

I don't have first-hand experience of this but a close friend is being supervised by someone without a PhD and is finding the experience very positive so far. I think it mainly hinges on whether the supervisors really know what a 'PhD-standard' piece of work should look like. Their supervisor has supervised PhD students before and is a leading expert in a very very niche field. Can they recommend any completed PhDs for you to peruse, for example? If one supervisor is inexperienced at supervising students, the other supervisor really ought to be more experienced. This is my situation, though both of mine have PhDs.

I'm not sure if there are official minimum requirements but if you're really worried, your university should provide a neutral third-party for you to speak to. You should do this before you get too far along. Hope that helps, and good luck.

Thread: How to write about project participation on PhD CV?

posted
08-May-15, 12:00
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 4 years ago
Hi all,

I've been accepted to take part in a project that consists of lectures, seminars, and fieldwork (art and architecture-based) for early career scholars. The project will take place over several months in three different overseas locations and the lectures will be given by some impressive experts.

So, yay, I'm pretty happy about it because it comes with some prestige. However, as I'm not *producing* anything (unless they ask me to give a short talk about my personal area of expertise), how can I cite something like this on my CV? I can't really put it under 'articles/presentations'...can I put it under 'training'? My CV is a bit...vacant, shall we say, so everything looks a little random on there.

Thanks for your help, wise forumites.

Thread: When do I actually *finish* the PhD?

posted
24-Apr-15, 15:54
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 4 years ago
Quote From Eds:
Quote From Nesrine87:
What exactly can the university do if you decide to call yourself Dr before then?


Write to the college and ask them- and remember to sign it, 'Dr.' ;)


Hah! Nice.

Thread: When do I actually *finish* the PhD?

posted
24-Apr-15, 14:42
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 4 years ago
It seems a little silly to me that you're 'not allowed' to use Dr until graduation. I always thought the graduation ceremony was just an opportunity to celebrate with others and take some nice photos. What exactly can the university do if you decide to call yourself Dr before then? That's a genuine question for people who know more than me. As Ian said, I thought graduation was kinda 'window dressing'.

Thread: When do I actually *finish* the PhD?

posted
21-Apr-15, 19:37
edited about 7 seconds later
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 4 years ago
Hi everyone,

Thanks for your responses. Sorry for taking ages to reply. The website's stopped telling me when someone's responded to my threads...probably my fault.

I've definitely taken a second look at my submission plan, and decided that it's worth trying not to rush, especially my supervisors seem to love taking their sweet time getting feedback to me. I suppose I should be grateful that I get feedback at all. And as you said awsoci, life does tend to get in the way...I had to have emergency surgery in my first year and couldn't walk properly for five months so I know that firsthand!

Thread: When do I actually *finish* the PhD?

posted
14-Apr-15, 15:43
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 4 years ago
Hi Ian,

Thanks a lot for taking the time to reply.

I'm a little curious now when I hear people say they finished their PhD in three years because it seems that between submission and final acceptance, there's got to be a minimum turnaround time of a few months. That would mean they're submitting well before the summer (roughly speaking). However, I guess if you are granted an early viva and pass with no corrections, that turnaround in theory could be just one month.

Question is, with the timetable I've outlined above, could I conceivably say I finished my PhD in three years, or is that pushing it? I don't want to sound like I'm being sneaky! I'm just genuinely wondering what people with PhDs think (and put on their CVs).

Thanks again,
N

Thread: When do I actually *finish* the PhD?

posted
14-Apr-15, 13:28
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 4 years ago
Hi all,

I'm getting quite confused about how long it takes to actually *finish* the PhD after submitting. Obviously, I'm sure this varies widely between individuals and institutions but I'm looking for some rough guidance...my uni website has just made me more confused. I would ideally like to be able to say to potential employers and on my CV that I finished in three years but I'm not sure what exactly counts as 'finishing' (hope that makes sense).

I started in Oct 2013. My current plan is to submit in early Oct 2016 (end of the summer holiday), so it counts as a Summer Term 2016 submission (have checked w uni and this is definitely correct).

Assuming my examiners don't take a million years, my viva would hopefully be no later than Dec 2016. With the optimistic hypothetical outcome of passing with minor corrections (a girl can dream right?), then maybe I'd be done and dusted by Feb 2017. Not sure how far I need to book graduation in advance but I could attend the March or May ceremony.

So...if that's my rose-tinted timetable, when have I actually finished? Oct 2016, Dec 2016, Feb 2017, etc?
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