Overview of TheNerdyWorkoholic

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TheNerdyWorkoholic
Sunday, 6 August 2017 at 1:28pm
Thursday, 5 October 2017 at 3:40am
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Thread: Does anyone think about suicide?

posted
05-Oct-17, 03:51
edited about 14 minutes later
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posted about 2 weeks ago
Hi Arthemesus,

I cannot relate to this specific situation because I haven't embarked on a PhD, but I've had my share of moments where things have seemed hopeless, at that time.

I agree wholeheartedly with what Ephiny says, that there is a bigger picture to this. I urge you to see the positive in this situation, which is, that none of this is your fault, but your supervisor's. Did you make a blunder in your work? No. Did you fail to have your work at the required standard, absolutely not. You've come so far, purely on your merit, so do not blame yourself.

The situation is purely to do with your supervisor. It wasn't in your hands. There was nothing you could do anyway to predict that your supervisor would cheat your bench fee. This isn't going to be on your conscience, so be mindful of that.

If your PhD takes longer, so what? It isn't the end. You WILL still get it, it may take just a bit longer than you expected. It's all part of your journey to get your PhD, embrace it. I had a tough first year during my Masters degree, where I felt like quitting innumerable times, but I pulled through. You are NOT alone.

I strongly urge you to concentrate on getting your PhD done, as best as you can. You can then look back at this in retrospect, and it will all be fine.

Do not give up, you're better than that, and nothing is worth taking your life over.

I wish you the very best,
TNW

Thread: What support do masters students get?

posted
01-Oct-17, 01:49
edited about 1 minute later
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posted about 3 weeks ago
Quote From helebon:
Hi The Nerdworkoholic, thanks. I am an MRes student, so a taught masters course. My course has some modules that I can choose from a list of options. I guess you must be a MPhil student?

Reading around things, MSc and MA students generally get a personal tutor and a supervisor for their research projects. I only have one supervisor, who was allocated to me and that's it.


Hi Helebon, I'm doing a Masters of Commerce by coursework, actually. So, that implies a set of modules I have to do, along with my research project in the last semester. Not very different from you, I'm assuming.

I think your supervisor situation isn't any different from what I've observed. As long as your supervisor provides you with the support and guidance that you need, I'm sure you'll be fine. However, do make sure that you meet your supervisor regularly and that you're satisfied and convinced with your progress, because it is your work at the end of the day.

Thread: What support do masters students get?

posted
30-Sep-17, 01:18
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posted about 3 weeks ago
Hi helebon,

I'm at the end of my masters degree and currently working on my research project.

I'm not very sure about what you're asking in the first part of your question, but I can confidently share my thoughts on the latter question.

To the best of my knowledge, the school allocates a supervisor to the student. One student may also be allotted two supervisors.

On the other hand, a student can approach a specific lecturer and request for them to supervise too, which is what I did. I did not want to be assigned to someone I would not be completely compatible with. I also knew who I wanted to work with, months in advance.

Additionally, at the Masters level, the topic of your project is commonly designated to you by the supervisor. However, in some cases, the supervisor may also be open to discussing other viable research areas you may want to explore. I was given a topic by my supervisor, but I told him I'd weigh my chances with another topic I had in mind. We met and I presented both topics to him and we decided to go with mine. I received good support from my supervisor and I have only positive feelings about this going ahead.

Good luck to you!

Thread: At a crossroads- Do the PhD or not?

posted
13-Sep-17, 13:54
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posted about 1 month ago
Thank you ToL and Tudor_Queen for your inputs! I have spoken to my supervisor and we have come up with a sure way to circumvent the situation. So, hoping for the best now.

Thread: At a crossroads- Do the PhD or not?

posted
12-Sep-17, 15:35
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posted about 1 month ago
I was told that role of RA is primarily given to PhD students, instead of others, just as a matter of giving those students the experience they need. Non-PhD students can also stand a chance, but are not the first priority.

Thread: At a crossroads- Do the PhD or not?

posted
10-Sep-17, 14:39
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posted about 1 month ago
Hi Tru,

Thank you for your response.

To answer your question, yes, I'm keen on being in academia, hence the intention to do the PhD, in the first place.

Your suggestions are insightful. However, I have a question: I work as an RA for a year, before I apply for my PhD? Because as far as I know, I can be an RA and earn as a result, only when enrolled into the PhD course. Anyone else has insights on this?

Thanks nonetheless, I will bring this up with my supervisor at our next meeting and see what happens.

Thread: At a crossroads- Do the PhD or not?

posted
10-Sep-17, 10:47
edited about 2 minutes later
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posted about 1 month ago
Hello everyone.

I'm back again with yet another decision I'm supposed to make now and I'm stuck. Let me give you'll some context.

I'm at the end of my Masters degree. I'm doing well and my masters thesis is turning out to be better than we expected. Long story short, my supervisor has now taken a keen interest in me and has offered to give me a post as his research assistant, in the event that I do decide to do my PhD (which he's keen on!). He made it very clear that he wants to be my PhD supervisor too.

The problem now is, THE MONEY. Where am I supposed to get it from?

I'm an international student in Australia and the fees are ridiculously expensive, and let's not even begin to talk about the other expenses.

I do not want to rely on my parents too much, because they've already done enough. I have the option of working for a few years and coming back to do the PhD, but my supervisor fears I'll move on and won't look back. I can also work and do my PhD part-time. But I'm most keen to start and finish the PhD, and not stretch it too far, for my own sake.

I'm scared to take a loan, because of the outstanding debt I'd be into after that, for a long, long time.

I'm hopeful and excited to do the PhD, but I need practical steps moving forward now.

Has anyone ever been in this, or a similar predicament, where finances was a hurdle? If so, how did you overcome it? Any advice will help multi-fold!

Many thanks,
TNW

Thread: A happy thread - let's spread the PhD joy! (ha)

posted
10-Sep-17, 10:35
edited about 26 seconds later
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posted about 1 month ago
Hi Trilla,

I have scanned so many opinions and articles and yes, I'm aware of the upheavals that come with a PhD. I know what I'm getting into.

Thanks for telling me that I'm not the only one with financial constraints :) Like you, I too will find a way.

I'm sure after you finish sorting out your bibliography and the like, you will have a clear mind to do what's next. I wish you all the very best.

Thread: A happy thread - let's spread the PhD joy! (ha)

posted
10-Sep-17, 02:01
Avatar for TheNerdyWorkoholic
posted about 1 month ago
Hi Trilla,

I'm so happy to see such a happy sounding post! Congratulations on finishing your PhD, regardless of all the tough moments that made you think otherwise! This holds as real inspiration for someone like me, who is at a crossroads in my life, where I have to decide whether I want to do a PhD, or not.

What am I up to, you ask? Working on a Masters Dissertation that I'm passionately in love with. Much to my supervisor's and my surprise, it's actually turning out to be really nice. Happy supervisor, happy life!

My supervisor has offered me a position as his research assistant and has also made it clear that he's happy to be my PhD supervisor as well (we get along very well :D!) But I'm not yet decided, as money is the issue for me. I don't want to make this a dull moment now, so I'll end by saying, that I'll find a way to get where I ought to be!

So what are your plans next? Academia or are you going to take on the industry by its horns?!

Cheers!

Thread: Post your surveys here!

posted
30-Aug-17, 07:08
edited about 4 minutes later
Avatar for TheNerdyWorkoholic
posted about 2 months ago
Hey everyone!

I'm currently collecting data for my Masters marketing thesis on the antecedents of watching Mukbang (a digital trend from South Korea)

Duration of survey: 15-20 minutes.

Target demographic: Asian (Indian, Singaporean, Malaysian, Thai, Japanese, Chinese, Vietnamese, etc.).

Need a sample of 200, so really pulling all threads here.

The link:
It is preferred to do this survey on a laptop/desktop, since the link gives a bit of trouble when done on a mobile phone (Qualtrics!).

Any help is very much appreciated.

Many thanks in advance,
TNW

Thread: Working from home or working at uni

posted
12-Aug-17, 10:01
Avatar for TheNerdyWorkoholic
posted about 2 months ago
I had this issue initially. I tried both, and realised I'm far more focused at university. So, I keep the lighter tasks for when I'm at home. It seems to work vice-versa for you and that's completely alright.

I became so dependent on the environment of my library to get work done, that I felt terrible staying at home. But I gradually got used to that too. I think it's only a matter of time and adjustment.

Thread: Should I be worried?

posted
09-Aug-17, 03:59
edited about 16 seconds later
Avatar for TheNerdyWorkoholic
posted about 2 months ago
First off, I constantly over-think, so I'm here for experienced perspectives, before I combust!

I'm currently working on my Masters Thesis. Long story short, I love research and decided to approach a supervisor, before I was assigned to someone I wouldn't be completely compatible with. The supervisor I approached, agreed and all was well.

The issue here is, it has always been me, being proactive and him being at the receiving end. I didn't pay much attention to it in the beginning because I knew I had to go the extra mile, until my latest meeting with him this Monday, where he said he was reviewing my weekly work and after a while got "distracted".

I was a bit disappointed with that, and I feel very alone. Don't mistake it however, because I work well independently and this is MY idea, but I still expected him to put in his bit.

In sum, I think I just need to hear whether I'm over-thinking and my thesis is doing me in, or I have a legit reason to be concerned.

Much thanks,
TheNerdyWorkoholic
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