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Tudor_Queen
Wednesday, 18 November 2015 at 11:56am
Friday, 15 November 2019 at 4:49pm
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Thread: How did you approach your literature review when you first started...?

posted
14-Oct-16, 20:29
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posted about 3 years ago
There are some really good books and websites on writing the literature review. They guide you through it step by step - e.g., explaining about searching for literature, writing an introduction etc. I highly recommend looking at some of these - they are really helpful for when you don't know when start.

Another suggestion - start writing early. Once you have a plan and have written a few words under each section you'll feel so much better.

Good luck!

Thread: Do any of you have a good supervisor? What is s/he like?

posted
14-Oct-16, 10:01
edited about 25 seconds later
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posted about 3 years ago
No problem - it's just really hard to put into words... months of negative stuff, feeling it wasn't working out how I wanted it to, feeling annoyed/disappointed with them... myself, and academia!

I wrote down a few notes about a) what upset me/caused negative feelings, b) why I thought this might be, and c) how I would respond/how I wanted to appear to others going forward - a sort of strategy. That helped.

Sometimes, I was comparing the relationship I had with them to other working relationships I'd had in the past (more successful ones in my view). When it really got better was when I somehow let go off all of my expectations that I had of academia, my supervisors, the student-supervisory relationship - and just decided to make the best of my situation - even if it wasn't how I'd imagined it should be, or how it might have been if I'd done X, or worked with X supervisor.

I can't really explain how I did that/how it happened. I think it was a bit like if I didn't I would spiral further down and really not make the most of my PhD experience. Things are so much better now - it is unbelievable.

I'm not sure if this helps. Feel free to PM me if you want to talk about specifics of your situation or mine. : )

Thread: Do any of you have a good supervisor? What is s/he like?

posted
13-Oct-16, 13:37
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posted about 3 years ago
I don't know if this helps... I was having issues myself a few months a go. Supervisor related. (See previous threads by me this year). And now things are 100x better. There is hope!

Thread: Do any of you have a good supervisor? What is s/he like?

posted
12-Oct-16, 21:22
edited about 19 seconds later
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posted about 3 years ago
Mine is a similar situ to Mattfabs, except my less experienced one who reads all my things is older, and my super experienced professor one (who I don't think reads my work in detail but it's OK) is pretty young (40s). She gives more oversight, more the bigger picture. My main (less experienced one) is very supportive, always replies to emails in good time, and gives detailed feedback.They are both good and sort of compliment one another.

What sparks this thread, Hugh?

Thread: Can I please ask what you did within the first 6 months of your PhD? What did you achieve? Hours?etc

posted
12-Oct-16, 21:16
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posted about 3 years ago
Hi Maria212 - I haven't read any whole books - just chapters from good ones - very selective. But this probably depends on how familiar you are already with your area. My advice would be don't stress over anything (easier said than done, I know... but it is only counterproductive). If you feel that you should be reading more, or that reading more will reduce your anxiety, why not make a planner of the reading you will do over the next few weeks. You could tick off chapters/papers you've read and write small summaries on them. I think that writing the ethics application will help, as I imagine it needs a bit of background/a mini lit review. That would be a really good place to start. Stay chilled!
Tudor

Thread: Can I please ask what you did within the first 6 months of your PhD? What did you achieve? Hours?etc

posted
12-Oct-16, 10:00
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posted about 3 years ago
Ps. I was full time. And reading what I've written it sounds like I achieved quite a lot in the first 6 months. At the time it felt like I was doing nothing.

Thread: Can I please ask what you did within the first 6 months of your PhD? What did you achieve? Hours?etc

posted
12-Oct-16, 09:56
edited about 9 seconds later
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posted about 3 years ago
I was really stressed because I had no clue what I was supposed to be doing for the first 3 months. Yeh, reading etc - but it felt a bit random. I was already familiar with my topic so if I could turn back the clock I would get myself out collecting data as soon as poss, instead reading bits and bobs and not really doing much.

It helped because my uni requires a 3-month literature report (just to check you have some understanding of the area, where your project could go, and that you can write in an academic way). That at least made me feel like I was doing something, although I got really stressed because it felt like something major, when actually in hindsight it was more of a tick-box activity.

So what I achieved - got my bearings a bit, got the 3 month report done, started the ethics application so that I could start to collect data for my first study (although some of my friends are still doing their first ethics application now - in their 2nd year - it depends on your project).

How are you getting on?

Thread: Applying for own Research Council-funded PhD

posted
08-Oct-16, 11:44
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posted about 3 years ago
Yeh, it must be what TreeofLife says. I am not sure why your supervisor would have done that - could just be inexperience/lack of knowledge (my supervisor wasn't sure of all the possible ways of applying for funding when I applied for mine). I think the fact that you developed the project puts you in very good standing to be the student who is awarded the funding. I would make it clear in the interview(s) that you actually came up with it/developed it/had very strong input, what your plans are etc - it makes you the ideal candidate. You are at an advantage to all other candidates as you have all the background knowledge that has informed the project proposal. It is also possible that you're also more likely to see it through - as it was your own idea to begin with.

Thread: Applying for own Research Council-funded PhD

posted
07-Oct-16, 11:25
edited about 51 seconds later
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posted about 3 years ago
In my experience this sounds a little strange. I've only heard of developing a project yourself (or with supervisor support) and going for the Research Council funding as yourself (no other candidates - just you plus your project), or applying for a pre-existing project, which multiple candidates might apply for (although sometimes if you've been closely involved or something it might be "known" that it you are going to be selected but they have to go through the motion of interviewing other candidates and rejecting them).

Yours sounds like a bit like a mixture of the two. It sounds terribly unfair that your project could be given to another student. If it isn't too late could you not say that you want to put yourself and your project (as a package) forward for funding (the first route I described above)?

Thread: PhD at older age?

posted
06-Oct-16, 09:36
edited about 13 seconds later
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posted about 3 years ago
It seems everyone's student-supervisor relationship is different. Books suggest this too! I know some people who are like best friends with their sups. They like that - I wouldn't. Fully agree with Trilla - age doesn't matter. Issues can arise whatever variables are involved. Most important thing is determination that you want to achieve the thing!

Thread: Viva prep: how many hours!?

posted
05-Oct-16, 20:52
edited about 1 second later
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posted about 3 years ago
I'm not at that stage yet, but I think that since you are working full time it would be good to dedicate a certain amount of time each day to it, or whole weekends (or both - remember to take some time out though). You want to feel as prepared as you can in the given time available. I think in a sense without knowing it you would have already been preparing for the viva - writing the thesis, reading the literature, reflecting in the discussion will all feed in.

Personally I think I will spend more time being extremely familiar with what I have done and the literature I have referred to rather than reading more widely at this stage (within reason - you can't know every study inside out - but at least be familiar with the kind of study it was if you've referred to it - and more specific details if it is one that you elaborate on or place a lot of weight on in the lit review). I wouldn't do it in hours per se, but I'd divide the time I have into covering sections of my thesis.

I'm sure people who have already prepared for theirs will have more useful advice. This is based on my continuation report viva which went well.

Thread: PhD at older age?

posted
05-Oct-16, 19:38
edited about 1 minute later
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posted about 3 years ago
I'm not sure what others think about this, but I can't really liken the supervisor-student relationship to a manager/boss-employee one. For me, it has been completely different. I'd say it is more like a marriage, or very longterm relationship (but no, more like a marriage - because your funding is involved, etc so no way do you want a divorce!). Your PhD is like the baby. If you're getting on, great. If not, then there is a very different kind of stress/feeling until you can work it out with them. You don't leave your PhD in the office (even if you technically do) - it's more than a job.

But it's something you navigate once you get to know them. It would be hard to know beforehand if there were going to be issues. If you're determined to do a PhD and enjoy the process, you'll make a way for it to work out if things do get tricky on the supervisor front.

My supervisors are also great!

Thread: Can I submit an article-under-review for an essay prize?

posted
04-Oct-16, 19:53
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posted about 3 years ago
OhMyGoodnessHazyJaneIHopeTheyDidn'tGetSecondPrize! Or_were_they_slightly_more_clever_about_it?

Thread: Lazy PhD advisor destroyed my experience of doing research and PhD

posted
04-Oct-16, 19:51
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posted about 3 years ago
My situation is similar to TheEngineers. I wouldn't say my second sup is bad, but they definitely aren't as available and interested as my main (less high profile) one. If you don't have a second supervisor, could you request for one? It could be done in a tactful way by justifying it by a research related issue (e.g., want to develop more in X direction).

Thread: PhD at older age?

posted
04-Oct-16, 19:47
edited about 2 seconds later
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posted about 3 years ago
I'm 30 and in my 2nd year of a PhD. Would I do it at 40 if I hadn't already started? Definitely!

Of course it also depends on your commitments, finance etc. But if you want to do a PhD, and are in a position to do one... go for it!
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