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Tudor_Queen
Wednesday, 18 November 2015 at 11:56am
Monday, 10 December 2018 at 5:49pm
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Thread: Do you include a "blurb" at the top of your CV?

posted
24-Oct-18, 14:49
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posted about 2 months ago
cheers Engm I'm happy with my cv that I use for jobs. I am wanting to tweak this version quite a lot for the fellowship application. Cheers Nad75 - I think I will do something similar to that. I do want to showcase my research skills somehow, since I don't yet have much of a publication record. I like the idea of using commas instead of space consuming bullet points and new lines!

Thread: Do you include a "blurb" at the top of your CV?

posted
24-Oct-18, 09:32
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posted about 2 months ago
Ps. I don't have time to see a careers advisor. I'm submitting an application for a really competitive fellowship pretty last minute. I know... ... .... but still - it's an experience and you never know!

Thread: Do you include a "blurb" at the top of your CV?

posted
24-Oct-18, 09:31
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posted about 2 months ago
Thanks - this is useful to hear! I might do something similar with "objectives" - just to reinforce my personal statement. I also like the advice about putting the attractive stuff first. My publication record is almost non existent (but I think it is OK given that I haven't finished my PhD yet). And it feels so disappointing when that is the first thing I show. I kind of thought I had to with it being an academic CV. But maybe with me being so early career stage I could put my departmental activities and research experience first (I have more of that stuff - so the start of the CV won't look so meagre if I put that at the top - after education history of course).

Thread: Do you include a "blurb" at the top of your CV?

posted
23-Oct-18, 22:44
edited about 13 seconds later
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posted about 2 months ago
This is just out of curiosity really... Do you include a blurb (a few statements about you, your work, your ambitions, whatever) at the top of your CV before you put your education and roles etc?

I don't tend to but I am thinking of adding one...

Thoughts appreciated!

Thread: How do people end up disseminating results on radio, in newspapers, etc?

posted
23-Oct-18, 22:43
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posted about 2 months ago
Thanks pm133. To be honest, I am writing it to help me get the funding. I will look more into it when it actually comes to it though - so cheers for the tip.

Thread: How do people end up disseminating results on radio, in newspapers, etc?

posted
23-Oct-18, 12:16
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posted about 2 months ago
Thank you both!!!!

Thread: How do people end up disseminating results on radio, in newspapers, etc?

posted
22-Oct-18, 17:42
edited about 11 seconds later
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posted about 2 months ago
Hello folks,

I'm writing a dissemination strategy, and I'm wondering how people end up getting to talk about their work on things like Radio 5 and Radio 4 (albeit it tends to be in the middle of the night that I hear such snippets!), and in quite general newspapers/magazines? Presumably you contact them and tell them about your work to see if they'd be willing to do a piece? And if that is the case, I'm guessing on the dissemination strategy you might simply state that you will do that?

Cheers anyone!

Thread: Dear early career researcher, can I see your grant / fellowship application?

posted
19-Oct-18, 22:18
edited about 13 seconds later
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posted about 2 months ago
Hi! I am applying for a fellowship. I have no clue what it should look like (what I mean by "should" is what kinda style is appropriate etc - how a good well written one might look like). I wondered if any one on here has an example of a successful grant / fellowship application that they could share with me? If so, please pm me... Thanks...

Thread: What is the best way you found to take notes while researching your topic?

posted
08-Oct-18, 21:58
edited about 10 seconds later
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posted about 2 months ago
I think it only needs to be so detailed when you actually need that info for the main part of the review - you know the studies that are really relevant to your own. The more general background ideas can have much more general notes (if any at all) - I don't take notes on everything I read. When it is more contextual and less an issue of contention / that I am specifically addressing then there is much less need for detailed notes. Taking notes to the same level on all the literature you read could certainly be inefficient. Be selective.

Best of luck with it all.

Thread: What is the best way you found to take notes while researching your topic?

posted
07-Oct-18, 16:34
edited about 49 seconds later
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posted about 2 months ago
Whatever works for you is fine. I tend to have an excel file and give each column a heading like authors, year, sample, aims, measures, results, my notes. Then I fill it in row by row for each paper on a given topic. You can double click to expand the cell, or press wrap to minimize it - so there's no limit on how much you can write per cell. If it's a book or something I'll sometimes type up notes in a word document.

Thread: Writing a grant - how it works

posted
07-Oct-18, 12:31
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posted about 2 months ago
Thank you pm133 and Thesisfun.

So it sounds as though you identify a host university and person or team, and then you write the funding application. Much like applying for PhD funding.

Good point pm133, I should indeed check the individual websites and guidance. It just seems a bit mystical to me (a bit like how it was when I was trying to understand how applying for PhD funding worked), so I thought people on here might be able to shed some light on the process for me.

Thread: Writing a grant - how it works

posted
06-Oct-18, 10:16
edited about 19 seconds later
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posted about 2 months ago
Hi postdocs

I have some questions about writing grants - more the application side of things than the actual writing. Do you need to be affiliated with a university / institution? I am just wondering how this sort of thing happens in reality. Might it be that you are working as a postdoc and at the same time putting together a fellowship application to do a postdoc at the same or another university? Do you need to have named supervisors on it etc, a bit like with a PhD application? Or can you apply for a fellowship AT a university - so you don't necessarily need to have that stuff sorted already (a bit like if you were applying for a PhD scholarship at a university with your own idea for the project but not much more than that?)

Hopefully my questions make some sort of sense.

Thanks
Tudor

Thread: Still no research question after a year

posted
30-Sep-18, 19:39
edited about 16 seconds later
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posted about 3 months ago
I think I'd set a time period and then if no success go for the RA job. Cos that'd quite possibly lead to opportunities where you can develop your own interests in the area of the post, and possibly end up getting funding to pursue them!

Thread: Still no research question after a year

posted
28-Sep-18, 12:43
edited about 14 seconds later
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posted about 3 months ago
I agree with both replies. Most students would benefit from support from more experienced supervisors in developing good research questions.

Thread: Still no research question after a year

posted
27-Sep-18, 12:31
edited about 13 seconds later
Avatar for Tudor_Queen
posted about 3 months ago
Ps. I feel your pain. I had a bunch of ideas before starting my PhD, but then went for a project someone else had thought up. It didn't work out because of problems recruiting participants from a high risk group. So I ended up having to sort of come up with questions as I went along. Not ones arising from genuine interest so much as, crap, this is the data I do have, what can I do with it? It wasn't fun. That's why I feel quite strongly about having a clear gap you're addressing - one that came to your mind and one that you're interested in. Then your questions will come out of it. Rather than poring through the literature hoping that questions will emerge. Does that make sense?
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