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Tudor_Queen
Wednesday, 18 November 2015 at 11:56am
Monday, 10 December 2018 at 5:49pm
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Thread: Quitting PhD after four years

posted
06-Sep-18, 18:21
edited about 6 seconds later
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posted about 3 months ago
If you can meet with a few people or discuss over email - and get their take on your thesis - that'll really help. It would have to be someone in your research area of course. But there are helpful people out there. If you just explained your situation and asked if they could offer some advice. You could make your supervisor aware that you intend to do it. I'd be trying to find a few people in the hopes that one is willing to lend a bit of their time to give their thoughts on it. If someone could help you in that way - by validating your thesis / story as worthwhile and worthy of the award in some small way, you will feel a lot more confident about writing it up.

Thread: Quitting PhD after four years

posted
06-Sep-18, 18:17
edited about 56 seconds later
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posted about 3 months ago
Quote From softykitty:

Thanks, my research area is quite new, basically I need to defend the most popular method, and conclude the new method is better performed. I can always have something to write down. It's just not creative or original, like a summary or review. I will do what you suggested. I should let the panel decide if I'm qualified. Have you ever thought what the problem it might be in your case? I mean the reason that stops you from being productive. I still don't know what mine is. Am I being incapable of doing research or my project is not doable.


This is a really difficult situation to be in. Can you get some second opinions on your thesis by showing a summary of it to other academics? It would be especially useful to have this since you don't sound 100% confident in your supervisor's experience / ability to advise you on the do-ability of your project. The thing is - you are so far in - have you actually carried out the research and got some results (whether the ones you were expecting or not). Do you have something that you can shape in to a coherent thesis / a story? I am wondering if that needs to be the priority now - plan thoroughly / figure out how you will shape your thesis into something coherent - so that you then have the confidence to write it.

Thread: Quitting PhD after four years

posted
06-Sep-18, 18:13
edited about 4 minutes later
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posted about 3 months ago
I would pay absolutely no attention to Crions!

Thread: Quitting PhD after four years

posted
06-Sep-18, 18:12
edited about 4 minutes later
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posted about 3 months ago
Quote From softykitty:
Quote From Crions:
Hello! To be honest, i am not an expert in this area, but i think that it will be better for you to quit the PhD now. Sorry, if my answer is too late for you.

Can you tell me why and give more details on your suggestion?


lol, yeh, that would sorta be helpful...

Thread: Quitting PhD after four years

posted
06-Sep-18, 13:45
Avatar for Tudor_Queen
posted about 3 months ago
Why is your supervisor willing to help you if he says it won't pass? Shouldn't he be forcing you to go to the panel for an MPhil downgrade if that is the case? Are you sure he is not trying this tactic called negative motivation? Also, why did he wait till now to tell you this? It sounds more like something has gone wrong with the project, he has become aware of it, and is now putting the buck on you. Maybe?

Thread: Applying for a new PhD after having to leave of old one?

posted
06-Sep-18, 08:24
Avatar for Tudor_Queen
posted about 3 months ago
Quote From pm133:
Quote From notsurewhattodonow:
Give your MH as the only reason, no need to mention the other stuff. Then prove you are now stable. They can't discriminate against disability. Go for it, and believe in yourself.


I would strongly recommend you do NOT follow this advice.
Telling any prospective employer that you have any sort of mental health problem is potentially disastrous for your career. You absolutely can and will be discriminated against in my opinion.


Sadly this is true. They can't by law (at least I don't think) but they can in practice. I think the advice you've got on this thread is really good. I think the main thing is to have the past firmly behind you - get comfortable with the narrative you decide to share (e.g., about new found passion) and just go for it. Also I wouldn't put all eggs in one basket - apply for a few (I give that same advice to anyone who is applying for PhD funding - it just makes sense).

Thread: Msc Students and Interns

posted
05-Sep-18, 22:31
edited about 1 minute later
Avatar for Tudor_Queen
posted about 3 months ago
That sounds pretty mad! I mean, you'd think your supervisor would be thrilled to have the extra hands and be giving them stuff to do herself rather than expecting you to have a bunch of stuff to give them. I'm not in your research area, but in mine I would probably be inclined to give them some reliability coding to do (that would genuinely be very helpful) or let them pilot run some of my experiments (again genuinely very helpful). Not sure if either of those things would be applicable to your area / project.

Are there any other tasks you could do with help on? Even perhaps reviewing the literature in a given area and providing a summary of the relevant studies?

Also you could ask colleagues if they need assistance. That wouldn't be palming them off... it would be more exciting and interesting for them if they were able to do some work that really needed doing for someone.

Thread: Question help

posted
05-Sep-18, 22:02
edited about 17 seconds later
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posted about 3 months ago
Hello, I have no clue about your subject area (although I must say that it sounds interesting), so this is just a general bit of encouragement / advice.

Who is rejecting your ideas on the grounds that they are not deep enough? Can they give you some ideas about what you could do to make it deep enough? Can you think out those possibilities and present them again, get feedback, and see if it fits the bill? It can be "well stressful" thinking you have to come up with an idea...I've been there before - I know what you mean about hitting a brick wall and empty mind. But reach out to your supervisors and get more specific input if you're struggling. That's what they're there for.

Oh and I don't think you have to worry about it being 15k. It is more about quality than amount.

Thread: PhD or job?

posted
05-Sep-18, 13:04
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posted about 3 months ago
If you decided to turn this job down another would come up if you waited till you felt more ready to make a decision. In the meantime, you could see uni counselling. I only suggest this because of what you said here:

Quote From notsurewhattodonow:
Hi I've had time off previously, I don't miss it at all. I just have a sense of dread that I must return. But I'm not sure if I'm confusing this with depression.

Thread: PhD or job?

posted
05-Sep-18, 11:32
Avatar for Tudor_Queen
posted about 3 months ago
Are you able to see a counsellor at uni? They might be able to help you talk through and come to a decision.

Thread: PhD or job?

posted
05-Sep-18, 10:17
edited about 15 seconds later
Avatar for Tudor_Queen
posted about 3 months ago
It depends on your relationship with them - do what you feel most comfortable with.

But before you do anything, have you taken a little break / time out? Sometimes that helps clarify things and there are fewer regrets later.

The thing is, if you do leave, it doesn't mean it is the end of the world - if you decide to pursue a PhD later then that option is still there. Or if on the other hand you think you want to persevere for a little longer and see if things improve, there will be other job opportunities that will come up. This isn't the be all and end all. If you don't feel ready to make this decision right now then you don't have to. The world (and the NHS) is full of opportunities and you can wait till you are more ready.

If you do decide to hang around a bit longer though and see how it goes, I would set a time period (e.g., 1 month or 3 months), after which time I would stop and take inventory - Have things improved? Do I now want to continue? Do I want to leave?

Blog: Basic engineering

posted
05-Sep-18, 09:17
Avatar for Tudor_Queen
posted about 3 months ago
H Eng, what are you doing now? Just wondered (and sorry if you have already shared it in another thread).

Thread: PhD or job?

posted
05-Sep-18, 08:00
edited about 1 hour later
Avatar for Tudor_Queen
posted about 3 months ago
By the way, what is it that is holding you back from taking the job?

I think that your supervisors will understand that you have to do what seems right for you at the time. You don't have to feel guilty. Supervisors being good to you even when you're ill is how it should be anyway - if they're decent human beings.

Thread: PhD or job?

posted
04-Sep-18, 22:15
edited about 11 seconds later
Avatar for Tudor_Queen
posted about 3 months ago
From what you've shared it sounds like you should take the job. Defo a good idea to leave sooner rather than later (less time wasted) and as you say you can do a PhD later (if that is your desire still) in the area you desire to do it in. Seems like that is definitely the way to go to me!

Thread: Problem with Postdoctoral Funding

posted
04-Sep-18, 21:57
Avatar for Tudor_Queen
posted about 3 months ago
Quote From TreeofLife:

You can apply for postdoc funding yourself if you're very competitive, but for a first postdoc it's unlikely you will be. Generally postdoc funding is obtained by supervisors or PIs.


Sorry ToL, I am not stalking your old posts - I simply searched for "postdoc funding" (!!!)... but your advice up here... is it UK specific?
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