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Tudor_Queen
Wednesday, 18 November 2015 at 11:56am
Sunday, 21 July 2019 at 7:32pm
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page 1 of 113 recent posts

Thread: Changing PhD, advice needed desperately.

posted
18-Apr-19, 15:36
edited about 3 minutes later
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posted about 3 months ago
Hi Arcturus7

This seems fine to me. Leaving sooner rather than later is the best here, I think. And to maximize your chances for future opportunities, I would be very open and honest with your supervisor, as presumably you are going to need references for your future applications. If he will not write one (can't see why not if you explain where you are coming from) or you aren't comfortable asking him, do you have others you can ask? You won't be radio-active. People will be able to appreciate your reasons and respect them, as long as you are open about things. Open where needed that is - I wouldn't even bother telling people unless directly asked "have you started a PhD before?".

Separately, maybe you could actually get some experience in the new area rather than risking going into it and realising that it wasn't what you thought it was.

Hope this helps,

Tudor

Thread: Just a moan...

posted
18-Apr-19, 14:43
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posted about 3 months ago
Ps. Sounds like a legitimate concern to me, not just a moan!

Thread: Just a moan...

posted
18-Apr-19, 14:30
edited about 10 minutes later
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posted about 3 months ago
Ask your potential sups... tell them you're up for it but how do you get funding... they should advise - may even know of some pots of money. In my experience, first port of call is always to try go for funding opportunities - if you have the grades. Even if it means waiting for the windows to come round again.

Thread: Acknowledgements when your supervisors were awful

posted
18-Apr-19, 14:28
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posted about 3 months ago
I had a similar issue. Don't think of it as lying. I mean, they went thru the motions and tried to fulfill their role. Keep it formal. A bit like acknowledging your funder or the gatekeeper or stakeholder with whom you actually had no personal involvement. I said something like: I thank my supervisors x x and x for their advice and support during my PhD. Just a formality... If you want to be more heartfelt about family, friends and whatnot, then you can do that in the following sentences. Anyone who knows the situ can read between the lines if that's important to you!

Congrats!

Thread: 3rd year graduate student- Really tired of my lab and thinking in leaving research

posted
15-Apr-19, 14:38
edited about 2 seconds later
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posted about 3 months ago
Yes, I have heard of something like this before - more senior person / supervisor seems jealous of less senior person's abilities / achievements. Just keep your head down, keep applying for funding etc, establish links elsewhere and move on asap :) As soon as I got out of my bad experience / context, everything totally changed for me, and I started to love my work again :)

Thread: Is it normal to feel like this?

posted
15-Apr-19, 14:11
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posted about 3 months ago
Ps. I agree with pm133 that PhD isn't like an everyday job / work at all. So yes, comparing to that won't be helpful.

Thread: Is it normal to feel like this?

posted
15-Apr-19, 14:09
edited about 16 seconds later
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posted about 3 months ago
Nope, not everyone feels like this. It's definitely good to be aware of these feelings and differences (to how you normally feel), as that way, as you say, you can put strategies to help yourself.

It does sound like things are going well on the academic side of things - but you maybe are lacking a bit of structure and reassurance. You can create your own structure by breaking that task up (there must be a way to do it) and getting that plan with dates and deadlines etc down on paper. You can also write down your milestones as you achieve them (e.g., submitted a paper for publication, did this, got that etc) so that you get a sense of progress and accomplishment.

But reading what you've said, maybe what is most challenging right now is home sickness or culture shock / the more social side of things? This is never going to be easy (8 months sounds a long time but isn't really) but you can definitely do certain things that could help. For example, staying in regular contact with friends back in Australia - but also being sure to get involved in new things here in the UK - so that you establish your network of friends and can relax and feel more at home here. Do you do any hobbies etc here already? Just probing a little to see what might be helpful to suggest! :)

Thread: Masters Or PhD?

posted
15-Apr-19, 12:58
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posted about 3 months ago
Masters will give you a taste for research, then you could go on to do a PhD if you think it is for you. Or if you feel quite certain now, then you could go for a PhD straight away. Someone posted about this the other day actually - whether it adds to do a Masters beforehand. I found it beneficial, as you get skills you will use later on in the PhD. I'd defo recommend Masters first, especially if you can get it funded. Lab technician / Research Assistant job is another way to gain experience before embarking on PhD and also a way to get a foot in door for PhD funding (just make it clear that is what you are interested in interview; some such jobs are even advertised as having the possibility of PhD funding later). So lots of options to think about! What are your priorities? I tend to be guided by funding possibilities. Good luck!

Thread: Every time I hear Elon Musk I feel a pity about PhD

posted
15-Apr-19, 10:00
edited about 1 minute later
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posted about 3 months ago
Do you have an idea or dream that's always there at the back of your mind but you feel too scared to reach out and go for? Or is this just a feeling that you get when you see Elon Musk and think, wow, why haven't I done something like him?!

I am just trying to get to the bottom of what is going on here... If it is the former, then go for it. Identify those things that are causing you to feel restricted or constrained, and make a plan to move forward. Even if it means starting something new and stepping out of your comfort zone!

If the latter, then, well... I think it's fine to be inspired by people like that if you find them inspiring. But don't beat yourself up or compare! Use it as a motivation to work hard and finish your current task!

Thread: How can I get better at writing essays?

posted
11-Apr-19, 15:47
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posted about 3 months ago
And you probably won't improve through using essay writing services!

Thread: Should I Wait or Message about PhD application

posted
10-Apr-19, 12:37
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posted about 3 months ago
I always make contact about such things. My theory is - if they are toying between me and another candidate and just don't know which one to choose, might obvious enthusiasm might be the deciding factor! A call to the admin office can't hurt! Best of luck!!!

Thread: Paper request

posted
09-Apr-19, 22:32
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posted about 3 months ago
How about other universities / libraries in Iran? Might be your best bet...

Thread: What are some good topics to write articles in the law field?

posted
09-Apr-19, 13:55
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posted about 3 months ago
• New laws to crack-down on cheating through paid online assignment writing services?

Thread: Changing focus / title of proposed research early on ESRC +3 studentship

posted
09-Apr-19, 11:48
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posted about 3 months ago
"Sticking to the same overall topic" means that you aren't making significant changes in direction in my experience - so don't worry about it! You're probably going to make loads more changes and venture into unplanned territory throughout the process. Congrats and good luck!

Thread: Training courses and/or skills on CV?

posted
09-Apr-19, 10:18
edited about 40 seconds later
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posted about 3 months ago
Hi Nesrine!

I think I would include those things - if the job were specifically requiring/desiring those skills. On one of my recent CVs I had a heading called "Skills and training relevant to xxx position", and then I had four bullet points under it with the most relevant things. I don't do this every time, it just seemed right for this particular thing I was going for (and indeed it was shortlisted).

One of the best pieces of advice someone gave me once when I didn't get a job and I asked for feedback was about how rubbish my cover letter was (she said it much more kindly than that though). The cover letter/personal statement should refer to every required and desired bit of skill and experience outlined on the job spec, and have examples of how you have demonstrated them or if you haven't then that you are extremely keen to do so. Anything that you're adding that isn't strongly related to the job spec, they probably are just filtering out. So if every sentence and point you make can be relevant - and have real examples - then they are going to find it hard to resist finding out more about you. I found it really helpful.

I am not sure if this helps but also maybe get some feedback from someone on the actual CV - maybe the career service at your uni or similar?

Tudor
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