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Tudor_Queen
Wednesday, 18 November 2015 at 11:56am
Monday, 10 December 2018 at 5:49pm
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page 1 of 101 recent posts

Thread: How to cope with depression

posted
28-Aug-18, 20:57
edited about 43 seconds later
Avatar for Tudor_Queen
posted about 4 months ago
Quote From Cat123:

I advise speaking to the relevant person in your department/ faculty about supervision and any possibility for changes, this hasn't been straightforward where I am though because they only seem to listen to the staff not the students.


Absolutely! Best thing to do is just switch supers to someone better without even going into why (that's what I did - refused to say why - just that it wasn't working for me - then there's nothing that can be used against you). If you go into details then it's seen as criticism (even if it's true), and that'll likely only cause more problems later... there's a risk you'll be disbelieved, stigmatized, and ostracized for raising any issues against staff.

Hope you can switch to someone who suits you better Nino. Also please see about getting support for the depression - it's so important, as I'm sure you already know.

Hope things are looking up Cat123. At least you like your PhD - that does make a difference!

Thread: Non-critical supervisors

posted
28-Aug-18, 20:51
edited about 17 seconds later
Avatar for Tudor_Queen
posted about 4 months ago
Quote From rewt:
I think it the polite way to put is that my supervisors are very "European" and I am very "English" in how we approach conversations. So I need to be a bit more clear about my need for feedback.


I know exactly what you mean here! I spent time in Germany as a teenager, which totally changed my communication style. I think I would have struggled with being direct about things if not for that (I came back and my family were all like "what's happened to her?"). I used to think direct was rude before that experience. Then I came to appreciate it as just being so much straightforward. Important to strike a balance though - some people do think direct is rude (even if it clearly isn't - they just can't handle it / don't like it - and I can understand that as a Brit who used to feel the same way!)

Good luck navigating feedback!

Thread: How to cope with depression

posted
28-Aug-18, 14:58
edited about 27 seconds later
Avatar for Tudor_Queen
posted about 4 months ago
I agree and wish I could edit out the last two sentences of my second paragraph. Things are only going to get worse if you work with this person.

Thread: How to cope with depression

posted
28-Aug-18, 12:38
edited about 5 seconds later
Avatar for Tudor_Queen
posted about 4 months ago
Hi Nino

I am very sorry to hear about what you are going through - it sounds incredibly tough. It sounds like there are quite a few issues going on. This is so much to try and cope with - in addition to your work.

With the proper support, you'll manage to work through these things I'm sure. There are different options. If you have a good relationship with your previous supervisor, could you ask him about possibilities of other supervisors? On the other hand, perhaps this new supervisor is going to help you improve your work and start getting publications. You could ask him what potential he thinks your project has.

I think the most important thing though is to address your mental health needs right now. A break sounds much needed - deadlines can go on hold. And seeing a counselor would be useful so that you can talk through things and begin to work your way through it.

Tudor

Thread: Non-critical supervisors

posted
28-Aug-18, 12:28
edited a moment later
Avatar for Tudor_Queen
posted about 4 months ago
Yes, that's a great idea! I did the same thing when I got to know someone (said hi and introduced myself lol) at a conference. We then stayed in touch by email and I asked her for feedback on a paper that had been rejected.

Thread: PhD dropout - finding jobs :(

posted
28-Aug-18, 12:24
edited about 2 minutes later
Avatar for Tudor_Queen
posted about 4 months ago
Try thinking about the dropped out of PhD thing differently... you'd be in exactly the same position now had you completed your PhD, that is - looking for a job. And believe me, you'd most probably be going through the same thing - rejection after rejection until... the one! Some people are lucky and get a job first or second time. For most people, it's a matter of being super resilient and just not giving up until they get a job. It is a struggle. Focusing on the fact that you left your PhD isn't that helpful. You're getting invited to interview, so that clearly isn't stopping you from being competitive. It's just a matter of patience and resilience.

All best!

Ps. I say "just" a matter of patience and resilience. I know how hard it can be and how hard it is on self-esteem etc. Like you say, just keep on trying, and you will be rewarded in the end.

Thread: PhD dropout - finding jobs :(

posted
28-Aug-18, 12:22
edited about 7 seconds later
Avatar for Tudor_Queen
posted about 4 months ago
Quote From iwan:
Quote From Tudor_Queen:
Keep it short (but do elaborate a bit if asked so that it doesn't make them think you are hiding something) and keep it positive. Getting rejections doesn't mean that you are doing something wrong. My friend had 7 interviews and got a job, another friend had 15 interviews and got a job. Some have many more interviews. It doesn't mean they are doing things wrong. Actually it means that you are doing something right because they are getting asked to interview. It means that you are competitive.

You could even go back to the ones you were rejected from and ask them for specific feedback.


I dont even know anymore tudorqueen. Immediately after each interview i have a good vibe that i did well based on how interviewer reacted/said but the moment i got the rejection email, it felt like a crushing blow and i go on an over analysis as to why i got rejected. Now that you have mentioned those, it is entirely possible that maybe they have seen other candidates as a better fit for the role.

Will keep on trying.


A good vibe is a good thing! My friend who recently got a job (7 very relevant interviews later) told me that she felt a good vibe (or clicked with them) in all of the interviews, and then was disappointed not to get the job. But she kept trying and succeeded in the end :-)

Thread: PhD dropout - finding jobs :(

posted
28-Aug-18, 08:32
edited about 12 seconds later
Avatar for Tudor_Queen
posted about 4 months ago
Keep it short (but do elaborate a bit if asked so that it doesn't make them think you are hiding something) and keep it positive. Getting rejections doesn't mean that you are doing something wrong. My friend had 7 interviews and got a job, another friend had 15 interviews and got a job. Some have many more interviews. It doesn't mean they are doing things wrong. Actually it means that you are doing something right because they are getting asked to interview. It means that you are competitive.

You could even go back to the ones you were rejected from and ask them for specific feedback.

Thread: Non-critical supervisors

posted
27-Aug-18, 22:06
Avatar for Tudor_Queen
posted about 4 months ago
Hi Rewt

Your response sort of makes me want to change my initial reply! As usual I was being shaped by my own experiences and seeing things with my black and white glasses on. Yes, it does sound like a situation where just an open conversation is needed. It sounds like they are reasonable people and so it should go well. They probably just aren't aware that you feel you could do with a bit more input / feedback. I hope it goes well when you talk to them about it.

Ps. The wanting more data thing sounds annoying! I've heard of that before though, and I am not sure what actually drives it! I guess some of it is the more data you can get (perhaps) the more scope you have to address different things and potentially publish (and even when you've left the data can be used by others). So I kind of see why some sups are always pushing for more. At the same time, you probably know when you need to stop collecting if you are to be able to write up on time!

Hopefully other people will have some advice for you too. It sounds like you're sorted. Keep us posted!

Thread: Conference abstract - different results/changes

posted
27-Aug-18, 19:04
edited about 11 seconds later
Avatar for Tudor_Queen
posted about 4 months ago
All was fine - you were all right! I'm still learning these things! Nerves now 100% settled. :-)

Thread: Non-critical supervisors

posted
27-Aug-18, 19:00
edited about 9 minutes later
Avatar for Tudor_Queen
posted about 4 months ago
It's not needy that you want to improve at what you do. I have had a similar situation throughout my PhD. It could be one of the following:
- Poor supervisors who are not able to offer you critical feedback on your work, although there are areas where it could be improved
- Poor supervisors who have the ability to give you critical feedback, but who aren't engaging in your work and providing it
- Your work is very good and there is very little that your supervisors can comment on for it to be improved

It could be a mixture of all three. If you realise that it is the first or second one, it might be worth changing supervisors... after all, you aren't going to develop from having your typos pointed out. One good thing you can do is get submitting your work to journals asap - sent it to high up ones in your field and get the reviewers' feedback. I had a rejection from a great journal, and the comments from one of the reviewers were like gold-dust to me. They actually caused me to think about my work at a higher level, which is what I believe good feedback should do. And normally, even if your work is to a very high standard, there is some scope for constructive feedback - even if it is perhaps comments on how you can expand your thinking in a future study. But the person supervising you has to have the ability to think at a different level too, and be willing to invest and develop you in that way.

I hope this helps. Don't settle for less even though it's great that your work is already good!

Thread: Revise and resubmit-passed viva exam second time round!

posted
27-Aug-18, 15:48
edited about 1 minute later
Avatar for Tudor_Queen
posted about 4 months ago
Quote From Drhannahb:
Quote From Tudor_Queen:
Quote From Drhannahb:
I would advise that you try to ignore what others are doing or how fast other people finish their PhD etc.


Trying to apply this now! : D


The best of luck Tudor_Queen! Whereabouts are you on your phd journey? I wish you well. The writing up phase is definitely the most challenging but it’s the last hurdle to overcome (the viva isn’t as bad to be honest). I felt much more elated when I submitted my thesis than when the viva ended, because you know the hard part is over.


I'm so sorry I didn't see this before. The short answer is: I am in my final year. :-) But if you want more detail, you can see:
Thank you for the well wishes! And congratulations on your PhD!

Thread: Anyone know about transformed variables in regression?

posted
27-Aug-18, 11:08
Avatar for Tudor_Queen
posted about 4 months ago
Just to follow up on my original question (in case anyone encounters it in the future and it is helpful) - I decided to just show the untransformed values in the models because the differences were so minimal and it wasn't worth the trade off of the results being super difficult to interpret vs slightly better accuracy. I have noted simply noted where the differences occurred with the transformed data and what they were.

Thread: Anyone know about transformed variables in regression?

posted
26-Aug-18, 19:35
Avatar for Tudor_Queen
posted about 4 months ago
I've transformed a few DVs for my regression models and all is cool - the residuals now look nice and normal and homoscedastic etc (before they looked less good because the variables were quite positively skewed). But... now I'm wondering how on earth to interpret the betas.. normally for one unit increase in your IV there is an increase of X amount (beta) in the DV. But how would one interpret this when the betas are based on log and square root transformed variables?

I'm half thinking it is better to just go with the slightly biased non-transformed data. The pattern of results is quite similar, and at least then the interpretation is dead straight forward!

Any advice appreciated!

Thread: Conference abstract - different results/changes

posted
26-Aug-18, 19:28
Avatar for Tudor_Queen
posted about 4 months ago
Quote From Pursue:
All the best Tudor!
But you can just inform the conference organisers that I have updated results, incase you can replace the abstract...they usually do that, it's just they make it seem impossible so that all participants are not always emailing with changes :-)


Thanks - I had actually wondered about that!
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