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Tudor_Queen
Wednesday, 18 November 2015 at 11:56am
Wednesday, 13 November 2019 at 11:02am
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Thread: Any social scientists out there who use R?

posted
22-Oct-16, 16:56
edited about 16 seconds later
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posted about 3 years ago
Thanks Dr Jekyll. I agree. I think! I'm just getting familiar with reading csv. files and doing some basic stats on my existing datasets. It sure does feel like a steep learning curve. How did you learn it? Could you recommend any good books?
Thanks
Tudor

Thread: Any social scientists out there who use R?

posted
21-Oct-16, 16:24
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posted about 3 years ago
Thanks kikodog. I'm learning it because I'm doing some multilevel modeling, which apparently R is better for... (I don't know why it is better, but apparently it is)...

I know SPSS, so I am wondering whether to screen my data etc as I normally would in SPSS before conducting the main analyses in R, or whether to just learn how to and do the whole shabang in R.

Thread: Any social scientists out there who use R?

posted
21-Oct-16, 15:23
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posted about 3 years ago
I have a question about whether it is really worth using R to do your basic descriptive stats and tests, when at a glance it actually seems much easier/less timely to do it in SPSS... If you are an R user - do you use R for everything in your analysis?

Thread: Last on to post on this thread wins

posted
20-Oct-16, 22:09
edited about 21 seconds later
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posted about 3 years ago
atchooo!

Thread: How to deal with competitive/ambitious students in my department?

posted
19-Oct-16, 17:12
edited about 6 seconds later
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posted about 3 years ago
I know what you mean! My non-PhD friends have even stopped asking me about what I'm doing - we stick to non-academic topics generally! I am just this perpetual student to them, who also acts like a lecturer at times (teaching) but isn't really one. It is generally OK, but can feel a bit isolating at times...

I hope the one person coffee/last minute invite ideas work, as it's good to have a PhD social network (in addition to this great forum).

Thread: Negotiate stipend?

posted
19-Oct-16, 15:58
edited about 14 seconds later
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posted about 3 years ago
Hey Yirara, Would love to hear the outcome, as I haven't heard of it being done before either.

Thread: 1st semester PhD student-terrible feedback on my first draft of ethics approval forms

posted
19-Oct-16, 15:54
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posted about 3 years ago
Hi Kazwales

Lots of people feel shocked by their first bit of feedback from the supervisor. When you say negative and blunt, do you mean as in "no, change this to x", "that is wrong, it should be x", etc? If so, this is more a case of critical feedback than negative feedback, and it is what you would expect on a draft - that is why you send it to them. At PhD level often the only feedback you receive is where to correct or improve things. So don't worry - it isn't about your ability to complete a PhD.

Tudor

Thread: How to deal with competitive/ambitious students in my department?

posted
19-Oct-16, 14:30
edited about 5 minutes later
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posted about 3 years ago
Urgh can't stand shop talk. I encountered it early on in my PhD and felt bad lots of times after interacting with certain peers. It seems to be something some people need to do to make themselves seem more competent/better than the next person. If a person needs to do that, then they are probably doing it because secretly or even subconsciously they are very insecure about themselves. If a person knows their own abilities and feels happy about themselves, then they don't need to bring others down to lift themselves up all the time.

I now avoid those who do it. And if I do happen to be stuck in a room with them, I don't let myself get drawn into it. It is harder in your situation, since, as you've explained, social events always seems to be a big group thing. Could you just invite just ONE person for coffee, and try doing that with a few different people individually over a period of time? You could pick those who don't seem to have their heads stuck somewhere (cough). And if you realise that they are still doing it, even in a one to one situation, you can simply cross them off your list of people you want to get to know better. There is probably at least one other person in the group who feels exactly the same way you do.

Thread: my supervisor gave my project to another student

posted
17-Oct-16, 23:54
edited about 3 minutes later
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posted about 3 years ago
I think that tru's final comment may have been based on your writing here. Even though you've had good feedback and encouragement about your English writing skills, there is often still room for improvement. Academic writing in English can be challenging even for native English speakers. It may show that you are extremely proactive and eager about continuing to do your PhD if you show that you are trying to improve in all areas.

I think you've received terrible treatment regardless. It seems incredibly unfair. Some people in academia behave ruthlessly because there is no accountability. I think that now you have to decide what you want - to continue or not. And if you decide to continue, then you must act quickly and proactively. I'd suggest the same course of action as tru has suggested.

Good luck.

Thread: Self-Funded PhDs. Good or Bad?

posted
15-Oct-16, 19:29
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posted about 3 years ago
I think you should try for funding. Limited opportunities out there perhaps - but they do exist. And there are other options too - such as PhD funding on the agreement that you do some teaching to cover some of the fees. Etc.

Another thing - a friend of mine self funded for her first year part-time (whilst working), and then managed to obtain funding after the first year to cover the rest of the PhD.

I'd say actively seek out other possibilities + options as well - there may be more opportunities than you're currently aware of. Have you talked to the postgrad officer in your school? They often know a lot and can tell you about things you hadn't thought of before.

Thread: How did you approach your literature review when you first started...?

posted
14-Oct-16, 20:29
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posted about 3 years ago
There are some really good books and websites on writing the literature review. They guide you through it step by step - e.g., explaining about searching for literature, writing an introduction etc. I highly recommend looking at some of these - they are really helpful for when you don't know when start.

Another suggestion - start writing early. Once you have a plan and have written a few words under each section you'll feel so much better.

Good luck!

Thread: Do any of you have a good supervisor? What is s/he like?

posted
14-Oct-16, 10:01
edited about 25 seconds later
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posted about 3 years ago
No problem - it's just really hard to put into words... months of negative stuff, feeling it wasn't working out how I wanted it to, feeling annoyed/disappointed with them... myself, and academia!

I wrote down a few notes about a) what upset me/caused negative feelings, b) why I thought this might be, and c) how I would respond/how I wanted to appear to others going forward - a sort of strategy. That helped.

Sometimes, I was comparing the relationship I had with them to other working relationships I'd had in the past (more successful ones in my view). When it really got better was when I somehow let go off all of my expectations that I had of academia, my supervisors, the student-supervisory relationship - and just decided to make the best of my situation - even if it wasn't how I'd imagined it should be, or how it might have been if I'd done X, or worked with X supervisor.

I can't really explain how I did that/how it happened. I think it was a bit like if I didn't I would spiral further down and really not make the most of my PhD experience. Things are so much better now - it is unbelievable.

I'm not sure if this helps. Feel free to PM me if you want to talk about specifics of your situation or mine. : )

Thread: Do any of you have a good supervisor? What is s/he like?

posted
13-Oct-16, 13:37
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posted about 3 years ago
I don't know if this helps... I was having issues myself a few months a go. Supervisor related. (See previous threads by me this year). And now things are 100x better. There is hope!

Thread: Do any of you have a good supervisor? What is s/he like?

posted
12-Oct-16, 21:22
edited about 19 seconds later
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posted about 3 years ago
Mine is a similar situ to Mattfabs, except my less experienced one who reads all my things is older, and my super experienced professor one (who I don't think reads my work in detail but it's OK) is pretty young (40s). She gives more oversight, more the bigger picture. My main (less experienced one) is very supportive, always replies to emails in good time, and gives detailed feedback.They are both good and sort of compliment one another.

What sparks this thread, Hugh?

Thread: Can I please ask what you did within the first 6 months of your PhD? What did you achieve? Hours?etc

posted
12-Oct-16, 21:16
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posted about 3 years ago
Hi Maria212 - I haven't read any whole books - just chapters from good ones - very selective. But this probably depends on how familiar you are already with your area. My advice would be don't stress over anything (easier said than done, I know... but it is only counterproductive). If you feel that you should be reading more, or that reading more will reduce your anxiety, why not make a planner of the reading you will do over the next few weeks. You could tick off chapters/papers you've read and write small summaries on them. I think that writing the ethics application will help, as I imagine it needs a bit of background/a mini lit review. That would be a really good place to start. Stay chilled!
Tudor
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