Overview of bewildered

Overview

Avatar placeholder
bewildered
Sunday, 8 June 2008 at 6:52pm
Sunday, 13 October 2019 at 3:46pm
1405
Login to send a private message to bewildered
page 1 of 62 recent posts

Thread: Returning to Academia after 10y break

posted
01-Jul-08, 11:30
Avatar for bewildered
posted about 11 years ago
I think really thinking it through in terms of the financial and career implications are key. There are a lot of older PhD students - you certainly won't be alone (although some have done their degrees as mature students and just carried straight on). I read your message earlier and having just had coffee with a friend who started her PhD after seven years in industry, I asked her what she thought you needed to think about and this is what she reckoned:
1) It's not just the financial implications of doing a PhD, it's what happens afterwards - make sure you are fully aware of the relatively poor pay, difficulty of getting academic jobs, the need to be geographically mobile to maximise chances and the fact that most academic jobs immediately after a PhD are fixed term contracts aka job insecurity. Oh and think through pension implications!
2) If planning a return to industry afterwards, try to do a fairly applied topic and keep all links and contacts open. They will be invaluable.

Thread: do I need a MRes after my Msc Eng?

posted
18-Jun-08, 21:20
edited about 2 seconds later
Avatar for bewildered
posted about 11 years ago
Are you looking for funding? If it's ESRC then yes you do need to have a recognised social science research MA (if you go to the ESRC website then there's all the information on what they do and don't accept - but I have a friend with a DEA from Sciences-Po and they didn't accept that for a Politics PhD...).

Thread: Using Dr Title ...

posted
16-Jun-08, 17:36
edited about 22 seconds later
Avatar for bewildered
posted about 11 years ago
Nope it's not true. I'm a postdoc and had to renew my UK passport almost straight after finishing. I was advised to put doctor on the form as I have to do overseas fieldwork and it helps establish you are who you say you are in awkward situations. My new passport has a note on the page before the photo saying 'the holder of this passport is Dr bewildered'.

Thread: Idiot professor - STABness!

posted
16-Jun-08, 17:33
edited about 30 seconds later
Avatar for bewildered
posted about 11 years ago
If there's specific comments like you suggest, she'll have read it. The sign that it hasn't been read are lots of random ticks and a generic 'good effort - try to develop your theoretical framework more' type comment! Oh and a mark you won't complain about...
I'd calm down before you go to see her and just ask for clarification - it may be one of those cases of miscommunication whereby both parties think they've made something clear and in fact it's not at all. Look on it as practice for the sometimes moronic comments you'll get on journal article submissions. I was told to put them away for at least a fortnight and only then look and decide what's reasonable, & what's not.

Thread: Using Dr Title ...

posted
14-Jun-08, 21:50
Avatar for bewildered
posted about 11 years ago
It's definitely worth using it with banks and applying for mortgages - makes you seem like a better credit risk apparently. It has other uses, particularly for women it cuts through that irritating Miss/Mrs/Ms thing. Unless you go around being arrogant about it, I don't see the problem.

Thread: WHY??? Business and LAW??!

posted
13-Jun-08, 10:28
edited about 14 seconds later
Avatar for bewildered
posted about 11 years ago
Maybe because people looking to do postgrad degrees in those areas have slightly different aims that most postgrads? The rank of the university seems far more important than who's teaching there for those subjects in a way that doesn't seem to be the case with other ones.

Thread: Difficult decisions: Great PhD offer or good job..

posted
12-Jun-08, 11:48
Avatar for bewildered
posted about 11 years ago
You're probably right - there are limits to how far someone with a masters can get in that area of business. I have a friend who has found that with Bayer and is really frustrated (you simply can't get promoted without one) but has got used to having a decent wage and doesn't want to go back to student living. But if you're a good candidate for a PhD now, you will also be one or two years down the line plus you'd have industry experience. Does your firm even sponsor PhD work? You could have the best of both worlds - some experience, a better financial position before starting a PhD and the PhD.

Thread: Life after PhD

posted
10-Jun-08, 22:14
Avatar for bewildered
posted about 11 years ago
I think many academics are genuinely so caught up in their research and fascinated by it that it is their life. They just don't understand that others find the hours too much - they don't necessarily intend to be mean, even if it feels that way, they just assume everyone is like them. Although to be fair, to get everything done that universities expect of lecturers nowadays, you do have to work 60 hour weeks.

Thread: Can I criticize my supervisor as she is criticizing me for some things that are not my fault?

posted
09-Jun-08, 12:41
edited about 6 seconds later
Avatar for bewildered
posted about 11 years ago
How about scheduling some 1 to 1 meetings with these new members of your panel and try to get them to be specific about the problems and what they think needs doing? You haven't got that personal relationship with them so it might be easier for you to stay composed.
You could tell your main supervisor that obviously your priority is to fix the problems so you have her advice now, you're going to get advice from the other two and then think it over for a few weeks and get back to her with new ideas. That would give both of you a break and time to think things over. It's exam board time for the undergrads now so she's probably desperately trying to finish marking and deal with problems with her tutees - she might be much more refreshed and able to think about your project in a couple of weeks time.

Thread: Worldwide, where is the best place to be an academic?

posted
08-Jun-08, 19:33
Avatar for bewildered
posted about 11 years ago
Oz apparently no longer is chilled. I have an academic friend there and they're introduced a research evaluation thing recently that makes the RAE look stress-free...He's looking to come back to the UK.

Thread: Can I criticize my supervisor as she is criticizing me for some things that are not my fault?

posted
08-Jun-08, 19:27
edited about 11 seconds later
Avatar for bewildered
posted about 11 years ago
I think it's really hard when you start a PhD. On the whole up to then you've always been praised at university, you've been one of the better students etc and then suddenly nothing you do is quite good enough. But it is your supervisor's job to critique your work as they want you to pass at the end of the day. And they get regular criticims too so she does know how it feels - I've seen some of the student evaluations of my supervisor's teaching and some of the rejections she's had from journals (to make me feel better). Put it like this - there are some nasty academics around but nothing beats a spiteful undergrad for really hurtful attacks

Thread: Can I criticize my supervisor as she is criticizing me for some things that are not my fault?

posted
08-Jun-08, 19:27
Avatar for bewildered
posted about 11 years ago
The question that occurs to me is - do you want to work with this woman any more? If not, simply go to whoever is responsible for PhD students and tell them you want to change to someone who's more able to help you rejig your project in response to the criticisms of it. You say they're abstract so I guess they're methodological or theoretical so there may well be someone better. You could use that time to make a formal complaint but I'd imagine she's already been told off for inadequate supervision.
If you do want to continue working with her, then I'd suggest being very businesslike in the next few meetings. Go in with precise questions about the criticisms and how to fix them and force her into agreeing a road map with you to move it forward. The most helpful thing you can do is try to separate the project and its pros and cons from your own self worth. Look at it like a car that needs fixing - something you wouldn't take personally.

Thread: Can I criticize my supervisor as she is criticizing me for some things that are not my fault?

posted
08-Jun-08, 19:27
Avatar for bewildered
posted about 11 years ago
Looking at it from a different angle, your supervisor is a newish member of staff and you are her first PhD student. She was probably really pleased to get the chance and was near enough to her own PhD to try and be the dream supervisor - friendly, always supportive, getting you involved in other projects etc. Then came your viva and her senior colleagues make it very clear that they think there are some real flaws in your project. Now you are understably upset with the criticism but I bet she's been taken to task too and been told that she's not doing you any favours by not making sure your work is up to standard to pass the PhD. She's now trying to take that advice on board and work with you accordingly. This is awkward for both of you and from what you say neither of you is managing it well right now.

Thread: What to do after the PhD??

posted
08-Jun-08, 18:58
Avatar for bewildered
posted about 11 years ago
Definitely you don't owe anyone anything. It would be courteous to tell your supervisor that that's your intended path though as they then know where they stand. Like anyone who's worked outside academia before doing a PhD, I have to warn you that there are MUCH worse places for back-biting etc though so don't be surprised. I have a friend in banking and his tales make my hair stand on end and no it's not about big deals etc, it's the petty small things just like every job I've ever had.
page 1 of 62 recent posts

Postgraduate
Forum

Copyright ©2018
All rights reserved

Postgraduate Forum

Masters Degrees

PhD Opportunities

PostgraduateForum is a trading name of FindAUniversity Ltd
FindAUniversity Ltd, 77 Sidney St, Sheffield, S1 4RG, UK. Tel +44 (0) 114 268 4940 Fax: +44 (0) 114 268 5766