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butterfly20
Friday, 29 May 2015 at 12:00pm
Friday, 4 May 2018 at 8:48pm
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page 1 of 7 recent posts

Thread: Is my supervisor doing a good job?

posted
22-Nov-16, 12:39
edited about 8 seconds later
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posted about 3 years ago
Is a supervisor supposed to care just for professional things?


Yes. It is a business relationship. Don't fall into the common trap of becoming attached to your supervisor. You are more invested in this research than your supervisor. It is your project to manage.

Thread: I've been offered a post that my friend really wanted. Feeling guilty.

posted
05-Nov-16, 09:21
edited about 15 seconds later
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posted about 3 years ago
Quote From DrJeckyll:
am I the only one asking the obvious. The position should be advertised, and the successful candidate should be selected from a pool of diverse people. Adam would be an unlikely candidate without a PhD in any case.

Some departments tend to hire the internals in position after position. This is not beneficial neither for the group that is inbreeding stagnant in the same ideas, neither for the young academic that stays in their comfort zone never exposed to new challenges and expertise.

Bottom line, I left my group of 6 years to join a new group. Terrifying, but worth it. I really progressed as a researcher in a way I wouldn't have otherwise. My advice is probably meaningless, as I wouldn't have even believed myself from the future.

Good luck


Wow what helpful advice...

For a start the OP hasn't said they've been offered the post, they would still need to apply. Secondly, there is nothing wrong with hiring internals. The job market as it is, often the best thing for graduates is for supervisors to give them an opportunity to start them
Off.The job is temporary, and it'll look good for future applications that the uni liked them enough to want them to stick around.

Thread: Do you ever feel like people don't get what you do?

posted
24-Oct-16, 19:57
edited about 7 seconds later
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posted about 3 years ago
Quote From Mattfabb:
I started my PhD in 2011 and my son was born in 2012, so I was looking after him throughout my PhD. I think, to be fair, that if you are living with your family and are not paying them rent or food, at least you have to help out when you can. I dont know how old you are but as an adult, there's no way you can simply live off the back of others and not give anything back. If you dont like, you can always move out.

My advice is to sit down with your family and try to work out a routine so that you can plan ahead; for me, I found that knowing that I had a limited time to write really helped me to focus on writing a certain amounts of words every afternoon. Besides, I felt really lonely as a PhD student so being with my son really helped me.


Yeah I get what you're saying. Especially as I can't move out, I'm currently unfunded. What's frustrating me more is my sister's demands of my time but I don't live with her.

Thank you everyone. :)

Thread: Do you ever feel like people don't get what you do?

posted
24-Oct-16, 16:30
edited about 19 seconds later
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posted about 3 years ago
I recently moved back to live with my parents because my scholarship ran out but I am still writing up my PhD-due to submit in December.

I feel like family just don't get that I'm busy or even have a job. I work from home a couple of days a week cos my uni is a 90 minute drive away. I'm constantly being asked to babysit my nephews,recently my sister asked if I could get home early from a conference that was a 2 hour drive away to babysit. My family are going out on socials and I'm being asked to make sure dinner is cooked for them etc. I have refused a couple of things my Mum and sister asked me to do, but all that happens is that they ignore me and so I end up doing them anyway.

Does anyone ever experience the same lack of understanding from people? If you think I'm being selfish or unfair feel free to tell me. But I am struggling to make people see just how hard this is, as well as actually make time to just work and focus on me? This was so much easier when I lived alone!

Thread: 1st semester PhD student-terrible feedback on my first draft of ethics approval forms

posted
20-Oct-16, 13:00
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posted about 3 years ago
Harsh feedback is something you'll need to get used to, as well as not taking it personally. If it doesn't come from your supervisor it'll certainly come from reviewers!

Thread: Censorship of Journal Manuscript?

posted
18-Oct-16, 16:34
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posted about 3 years ago
I'm so sorry you felt the need to do that, must have been gutting.

No I have never heard of that. My research is on racism so I publish papers with plenty of colourful language, although that language is from the participants themselves, and not me.

It depends on the audience of the journal I guess-did you discuss it with your supervisor? If it had been me I would have been tempted to suck it up and do what they said to get published. I have often followed reviewers' suggestions even if I know in my heart I would never write like that!

Thread: Reviewing article

posted
17-Oct-16, 16:38
edited about 7 seconds later
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posted about 3 years ago
I've popped another PhD cherry and received my first invitation to review a journal article :) I've no idea how this happened as I didn't apply to do it or anything!

I'm just wondering does anyone have any experience of this and can offer any words of wisdom? I'm so worried I'll read the article and just have nothing to say about it!

Thread: Low ranked university, but fully funded and great supervisor

posted
17-Oct-16, 14:23
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posted about 3 years ago
You have then severely criticised your university and cast judgement on your supervisors publication record.
It sounds like you are blowing smoke up your own backside and in the UK we have a delightful habit of teasing people like that. I hope you are not actually voicing these opinions. are you? To your colleagues?

Perhaps when you have finished your phd or have a decent publication record yourself you will be able to answer your own question about why a first year student should not be critiquing their supervisor in this way.

To return to your original point, and the reason I am addressing you in this way, is that your biggest problem here is your attitude. forget your supervisors record, your university ranking, your awesome grades and your wonderboy delusion. NONE of it matters. Get your head down, start publishing and let your work do your talking for you. That is your best chance of a successful phd. That is my advice.


Yes this. You don't say where the source is from for the rankings but a uni can be poorly ranked OVERALL, but have excellent prestige in a single department. At PhD level who you know counts the most, rather than the overall uni. Grades mean very little in getting onto a funded PhD. I got the standard 2:1 degree, but with multiple publications that's what got me to where I am.

Another point, staff will always be warm and encouraging to get you started. Then they will leave you to it and assume that you're getting on with things.

Thread: Postgraduates who teach - how many hours?

posted
18-Sep-16, 10:11
edited about 9 seconds later
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posted about 3 years ago
I was the same, I had to read a lot of papers and familiarise myself with the lectures as the content wasn't something I was familiar with. Usually when you start out teaching it won't be areas that are related to your own PhD research, something that a lot of PhD students complain about but that's the way it is.

I did receive a lot of support but I have to approach them, lecturers will rarely chase you up asking how it's going. You could do some of the reading and think of some ideas for the sessions, then see what the module leader thinks?

Thread: Postgraduates who teach - how many hours?

posted
28-Aug-16, 14:26
Avatar for butterfly20
posted about 3 years ago
I'm the same, I do about six hours a week. After two years of teaching I spend very little time on prep as I teach the same modules each time!

Marking can take up a big bulk of your time, and usually over the holidays as PerceptualLenna says. I'd give yourself a week or two at least. Same as with teaching, it gets easier with practise.

Thread: Issues with methodology (social science)

posted
03-Jul-16, 21:09
edited about 12 seconds later
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posted about 3 years ago
Have you been specifically told that you had to obtain reliability and validity? It might be that you have to run these tests if they are needed in the method section.

See what your supervisor suggests, Methods chapters in Social Sciences can be so difficult to write, having to justify methods and analytical approaches, as well as reading the epistemology behind them. So see what is required from you and what your potential examiners might want to see.

Thread: Chasing up reviewers?

posted
03-Jul-16, 21:07
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posted about 3 years ago
I sent off a journal paper for review back in February and I'd really like to chase it up now with the editors. Waiting to hear back this long is not unusual in social sciences, and people I have co-authored with have chased up articles but I have never done so myself. I am unsure of the protocol for doing this and what kind of message to send to the editor? I don't really want to sound unprofessional or give any easy excuses to have my paper rejected!
Anybody had any experiences in this?

Thread: Tips for presenting without Powerpoint screen

posted
16-Jun-16, 15:38
Avatar for butterfly20
posted about 3 years ago
I don't know why you'd want to do that? If the audience have a handout they will be looking down at that and not at you while you are talking.

Thread: What's it like teaching for the first time?

posted
13-Jun-16, 22:49
edited about 2 seconds later
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posted about 3 years ago
Let your personality show and be enthusiastic. If you appear to be bored of the topic so will they! I don't know what subject you teach but I usually try to incorporate examples and relate things to the news and current affairs. A video clip doesn't hurt to keep their attention too!

Thread: Lecturer I teach with always moaning he's busy and putting me down

posted
04-May-16, 20:26
edited about 23 seconds later
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posted about 3 years ago
Thanks for your response. It's only for a few more weeks, but I could be doing it again the same time next year (it's a semester two module only). I think if he's the lecturer on it again though I would turn it down.

That's a great idea, it might feel a bit awkward for me (being a Brit we always have that annoying politeness thing!) but like you say that's sends across such a clear message. Thanks :)
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