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butterfly20
Friday, 29 May 2015 at 12:00pm
Friday, 4 May 2018 at 8:48pm
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page 1 of 7 recent posts

Thread: Lecturer I teach with always moaning he's busy and putting me down

posted
04-May-16, 18:33
edited about 20 seconds later
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posted about 3 years ago
Have had just about enough! I'm a teaching support for this lecturer and every week I have to hear about how busy and how tired he is (he lists off what he's working on), and then I get the line "you've got it so easy". EVERY WEEK.

Today I was talking with another lecturer when he was nearby and I was telling this lecturer how tiring it is working on a chapter and this guy said "try marking all these s^&t essays".

The other thing is that he has twice pushed me to try and do things that aren't part of my role as a teaching assistant-take parts of the lecture, and mark the assignments. I'm not allowed to do either of those, as the students are 3rd year undergrads and it's the dept. policy. I've had to get seniors to intervene and tell him, because when I did numerous times he ignored it.

I know there isn't much I can do (but if you've got any suggestions of how to respond please tell me, I may end up losing my temper!), but I have just had it with him! I honestly can't listen to how busy he is anymore, and hear about how easy I have it!!!!

Thread: How to gain teaching experience in higher education?

posted
15-Apr-16, 13:50
edited about 5 seconds later
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posted about 3 years ago
I take it you aren't a PhD student? If you want some teaching experience you could try colleges for positions like teaching assistant or support.

To lecture at university it usually requires a PhD depending on the subject. Hence why PhD students are usually given seminars/tutorials to teach, as it builds up their experience.

Thread: Student from another university harassing me

posted
10-Apr-16, 13:47
edited about 28 seconds later
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posted about 3 years ago
I have a bit of an unusual situation and I'm unsure of how to handle it.

I had a fellow PhD student from another university as a Facebook friend, we met at a summer school programme a couple years ago but haven't spoken on Facebook at all since the programme ended. Anyway I was having a friends 'clear out' on Facebook and deleted her a while ago. She got in touch and was quite angry with me, and while I was honest and explained my reason, she was quite offensive so in the end I blocked her.

Now she's created another Facebook account and a couple of nights ago I got over 70 messages in one night, slagging me off and telling me what a b**ch I am etc. etc. I'm unsure of how to handle this situation and would appreciate any advice. I see my options as:

-Reporting it to Facebook-but that doesn't stop her from creating new profiles
-Reporting it to the Police-but I only know her name and university, not her address
-Reporting it to her university or department? I am suspecting that as well as harrassing me and causing me distress, she has some kind of problem that she needs to get help for.

Thread: What to look for in an external examiner

posted
01-Apr-16, 22:46
edited about 29 seconds later
Avatar for butterfly20
posted about 3 years ago
Quote From bewildered:
I don't know if you realise but external examiners get paid very little (usually c. £150 and then taxed as a second income at 50% i.e. a lot less than minimum wage given the time commitment)


Is that how it works? I thought it was just included as part of the job as an academic, with all expenses paid for. It makes sense though as to why most supervisors pick their mates!

Thread: What to look for in an external examiner

posted
01-Apr-16, 18:11
edited about 20 seconds later
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posted about 3 years ago
Definitely introduce yourself, but don't ask her to be your external. There is usually a formal procedure involved where the university writes to your external to ask them so it would be unprofessional for you to ask her.

If you get a feel for whether or not she's interested in your research, you can mention that to your supervisor.

Thread: SPSS Help?!?!

posted
31-Mar-16, 12:38
edited about 20 seconds later
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posted about 3 years ago
I thought the same thesisfun. Surely there's a breach of confidentiality/copyright rules there somewhere?

Thread: Need advice with ethical matters (unintentional plagiarism & intentional dishonesty)

posted
30-Mar-16, 13:49
Avatar for butterfly20
posted about 3 years ago
You need to read your University's Code of Conduct to find out what the consequences would be.

Thread: Need advice with ethical matters (unintentional plagiarism & intentional dishonesty)

posted
30-Mar-16, 11:12
edited about 22 seconds later
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posted about 3 years ago
Yes you're right, I was under the impression this was for the Masters project. But people do publish their undergraduate dissertations, if the OP has disseminated any findings there is a slight chance the bank could find out.

Thread: how long does it take for your journal manuscript to get a YES or NO?

posted
30-Mar-16, 11:01
Avatar for butterfly20
posted about 3 years ago
Seven months is not too long,sometimes I have waited as long as a year. You are not allowed to submit your paper anywhere else while it is under review. It's difficult but you just have to put it to the back of your mind for now and work on other things :)

Thread: Need advice with ethical matters (unintentional plagiarism & intentional dishonesty)

posted
30-Mar-16, 10:58
edited about 15 seconds later
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posted about 3 years ago
Quote From r90:
Due to the limitations of the words here, I did not explain well. Please understand that I only 'made-up' the answers of the interview (and it's just only 1 interview, no a survey) after the bank refused to answer them and it instructed me to go online to their website for the answers. So the answers are mostly based on the online information of the bank... Still, I should have acted better back then... any feedback?


It sounds as though you are looking for reassurance that you're okay to keep quiet about the issue, but your more detailed answer doesn't change my view. If you ever publish this work or the bank ever see your research findings, you could get into even more trouble, as I assume that you have 'collected' this interview data without the bank signing any kind of consent form?

Thread: Need advice with ethical matters (unintentional plagiarism & intentional dishonesty)

posted
30-Mar-16, 00:21
Avatar for butterfly20
posted about 3 years ago
The referencing error I would say is fair enough as you learn these things along the way, but those skills you should have picked up at undergraduate level.

The fudging of your data is quite serious and I personally couldn't condone you keeping that quiet. A part of research experience and development is dealing with difficult and uncooperative participants, and why you couldn't ask your supervisors for help at the time is beyond me. It does make a bit of a mockery of us researchers who work hard to collect data and try to find valid results.

Thread: Best programmes for academic poster?

posted
29-Mar-16, 18:41
edited a moment later
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posted about 3 years ago
Thanks both, that's really helpful.

Regarding the page sizes, this is something I hadn't thought about. If the poster was to be printed without the page correctly sized, would it come out with bad resolution?

Thread: Supervisor giving preference to another student

posted
29-Mar-16, 18:37
edited about 29 seconds later
Avatar for butterfly20
posted about 3 years ago
I was in a similar situation to you with my supervisor favouring his other student and I changed, it was the best thing I ever did. You'd be surprised how sympathetic other staff members can be towards you when you have such a big decision to make. I can't see other academics worrying about offending your supervisor. Academia is quite a selfish environment, and taking on a new student would benefit them and boost their own profile.

If you don't want to change, do you have a second supervisor you could use a bit more for help? That way you get the support but still get to keep your supervisor's name on your PhD.

Thread: At what point in your PhD did you know what you were really doing?

posted
05-Mar-16, 23:40
edited about 20 seconds later
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posted about 3 years ago
There's no right or wrong point at which things click into place. As chickpea said, your research question changes over time and even after data collection/analysis. My advice is to just keep writing your ideas. Write everything that comes to mind no matter how big or small it might seem.

I started my PhD with a very specific idea about what I wanted to research and how I was going to go about it (for the funding application), and it has changed completely since then. Nature of research! :)

Thread: What to look for in an external examiner

posted
03-Mar-16, 15:05
edited about 26 seconds later
Avatar for butterfly20
posted about 3 years ago
I think the usual way is to have one examiner that's familiar with your topic, and one that's familiar with your method. So it might be that your internal is more familiar with your approach.

Discuss it with your supervisor and see if they can prep you for any challenging questions that the examiner might have.
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