Overview of DrJeckyll

Overview

Avatar placeholder
DrJeckyll
Wednesday, 19 May 2010 at 8:33am
Monday, 24 September 2018 at 8:31am
589
Login to send a private message to DrJeckyll
page 1 of 28 recent posts

Thread: in desperate need of advice.. getting cold feet please help

posted
29-Dec-15, 17:57
Avatar for DrJeckyll
posted about 4 years ago
Listen to your gut feeling.

I was my supervisor 's second PhD student. It was great in terms of availability and resources as he really cared. It was bad in terms of workload as he was too ambitious and workaholic.

Thread: Coloured diagrams in thesis?

posted
18-Dec-15, 16:55
Avatar for DrJeckyll
posted about 4 years ago
Yes, I used lots of coloured maps etc. I did the graphs in grayscale and printed them colour (looks better). I printed separately on good quality paper, and asked them to post to binders (too expensive).

Thread: Viva - anyone else with a similar experience?

posted
31-Oct-15, 03:05
edited about 4 seconds later
Avatar for DrJeckyll
posted about 4 years ago
Nothing major to complain about, but also nothing to be excited about. For the individual it is of course a huge achievement but not necessarily for an examiner.


The opposite holds true with more senior academics being far more involved and supportive and "excited about". I find it hard to believe that one spent 4 years and resources that mount up to thousands of pounds, that would not even stimulate an interesting conversation for a couple of hours. At the end of the day, if being an examiner is such a drag, refuse politely and let someone else do it. Yes, some academics actually enjoy it ! Crazy, I know

pd1598 criticism on someone's work is essential when submitting to a journal, or there are problems with the PhD. It is pointless when a candidate had at least two supervisors involved, has presented in conferences and has journals accepted. That means that this work has been criticised by at least ten people before. It is pointless when they don't have something substantial and they go through the pages trying to find something to say that may not even have a scientific basis. It's not a "pat in the head" you expect but you walk into a viva hoping that the other academics share your enthusiasm and love for the subject, and they really want to discuss about it, not fill in some forms, ask the standard questions, and go home.

Thread: Viva - anyone else with a similar experience?

posted
30-Oct-15, 09:24
edited about 6 seconds later
Avatar for DrJeckyll
posted about 4 years ago
Hi TreeofLife,

I had a very similar viva experience and I also got minor corrections. I have experienced the micro-aggressions in the viva. I went to the viva knowing that I will not fail, as I had a two-digit number of publications (journals, conferences, book chapters, technical reports etc).

My 4-year PhD was overall a positive experience (apart from the financial exploitation side of things). But the viva stays in my memory as a stain. They were late. The nicest thing they said was " there is enough for a PhD". They were unpleasant throughout. The external was talking to me slowly (because I am foreigner I assume, despite living in England for a decade). It did not shake my confidence but it reminded me of how important it is that we are gentle and kind to each other.

In any case just finish the corrections and forget about it. Maybe some day there is a PhD by publication (where people contribute to something) and there is no need for vivas.

To all of you out there, choose examiners wisely. They should be nice people and good scientists.

Thread: No response to request for article feedback - what next?

posted
21-Oct-15, 17:14
edited about 16 seconds later
Avatar for DrJeckyll
posted about 4 years ago
Stalk him to find out where he lives, then break into his house and hide under the couch. Wait until Sunday morning when he reads his newspaper with a warm cup of coffee, and then subtly slip the printed version of the paper inside the newspaper.

Thread: How can I do a PRE-TEST???

posted
18-Oct-15, 13:28
Avatar for DrJeckyll
posted about 4 years ago
"I stumbled upon a paper that carried out a pre-test to generate items"

Contact the authors of this paper and ask them for the questionnaire. Most people are happy to help.
This is what I did :)

Thread: How can I do a PRE-TEST???

posted
16-Oct-15, 09:15
Avatar for DrJeckyll
posted about 4 years ago
I also wanted to collect some characteristics of participate and case studies. As I didn't know which factors would be important, I used extensive standardised questionnaires. Developing such questionnaires might be a project on its own. The key here is standardised

Thread: No response from my supervisor after accepting to supervise me

posted
06-Oct-15, 09:19
edited about 18 seconds later
Avatar for DrJeckyll
posted about 4 years ago
Do you have any other contact person in the department? Like a post-doc or PhD student who will be supporting you on a daily basis? Contact them instead. Book a visit in the department if you can.
And keep calm, he is just busy.

Thread: Viva next week: tips and advice for before and during?

posted
04-Oct-15, 11:57
Avatar for DrJeckyll
posted about 4 years ago
Congratulations !!!!!!!!!!!!!

If you are currently working, get some time off to do the changes rather than stressing over them on weekends :)

Thread: Top tips for the first year?

posted
04-Oct-15, 11:47
edited about 1 second later
Avatar for DrJeckyll
posted about 4 years ago
Good advice already!

I just want to add that "things are slower" is an illusion that deceives many students. You might not have the day-to-day to deliver specific outcomes, but you have milestones you should be hitting every six months or so.

I can't speak for other PhD experiences, but my PhD was harder than my previous job (I ran my own practice as an engineer) both in terms of long-hours and intellectual effort.

Thread: How do you deal with jealousy issue at your cohort?

posted
04-Oct-15, 11:31
Avatar for DrJeckyll
posted about 4 years ago
I have to deal with such issues of open aggressiveness from individuals from my cohort even post- PhD. I think it is very much related to the few academic places available, and the large number of PhD students produced in mass. People feel insecure and view me as a competitor to their success. It is hard to deal with this issue. I have my own issues of feeling like an outcast since childhood (for various reasons), so I can't deal very well with aggressiveness/ rejection etc...

Passive-aggressive disruption when working quietly using loud music, drawer-banging, loud phone calls etc was the preferred strategy from another individual in the open space. But I was less concerned about that.

Thread: Two-Body Problem

posted
04-Oct-15, 11:16
edited about 1 second later
Avatar for DrJeckyll
posted about 4 years ago
Hi SecondWing,

I had to look up the term! Sorry. Yes, it is quite common (that's why it has a name!).

A friend of mine didn't manage to get a new academic position after moving cities, but as a couple they have a better quality of life in the new place now.

Some other academics work from home most days of the week and commute two-three days etc. Commuting in these cases varies from 1 to 3 hours. This is particularly true for London academics that are often out-priced by the rent. In those cases they are flexible, but that might not be achievable if you are lab-based.

Hope it works out for you.

Thread: research design advice for clinical research

posted
29-Sep-15, 20:00
edited about 10 seconds later
Avatar for DrJeckyll
posted about 4 years ago
A control group can be unethical. If you start an intervention that there is evidence that is beneficial for a group of people, then you deny these benefits from the control.

So, one way to go around this problem, is to offer to the control group an improved version of the intervention next year.

Thread: How far under maximum words in Humanities?

posted
29-Sep-15, 19:42
edited about 26 seconds later
Avatar for DrJeckyll
posted about 4 years ago
I don't know exactly how many words, because I did mine in latex, but it was really short, 165 pages with lots of images graphs and tables included. I estimate it was 50k (maximum 100k). Possibly in social sciences :) passed with minor.

People who write more than 80k have a strategy: bore the examiners to death, make them lose the will to live, become suicidal etc :)

Thread: Should I stay or leave my PhD?

posted
26-Sep-15, 23:26
edited about 9 seconds later
Avatar for DrJeckyll
posted about 4 years ago
Finish the PhD. The PhD is training on how to do research, the topic is largely irrelevant. You have a fellowship and a supportive environment, which is just as good as it gets.

Apply for a postdoc anywhere you wish. My undergraduate degree is so different from my postdoc that people just stare at me when I tell my story :) in the department I did the PhD you could find architects, psychologists, mechanical engineers, physicists, mathematicians, epidemiologists, medics, chemists, microbiologist, economists working on the SAME project :)

Good luck!
page 1 of 28 recent posts

Postgraduate
Forum

Copyright ©2018
All rights reserved

Postgraduate Forum

Masters Degrees

PhD Opportunities

PostgraduateForum is a trading name of FindAUniversity Ltd
FindAUniversity Ltd, 77 Sidney St, Sheffield, S1 4RG, UK. Tel +44 (0) 114 268 4940 Fax: +44 (0) 114 268 5766