Overview of DrJeckyll

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DrJeckyll
Wednesday, 19 May 2010 at 8:33am
Monday, 24 September 2018 at 8:31am
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page 1 of 28 recent posts

Thread: I left my PhD, but I still wish to pursue..was it a mistake leaving PhD ??

posted
15-Feb-14, 07:58
edited about 15 seconds later
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posted about 6 years ago
Quote From mannuela28:
Hie. I was a phd student and I left PhD after 8 months. I failed in my coursework and was unable to cope up with the surroundings and loneliness in institute. So, under severe depression, I left my PhD. Back then I thought, PhD is not my cup of tea..


Well, the phd is not exactly a bucket of sunshine.... I haven't faced any major problems so far, but I did struggle with depression an stress at times, and the feeling of loneliness and isolation is more often than not. I spend 15 hours a day typing in front of a computer, it would be surprising if I was feeling splendid.

Hope you are prepare that feelings like that might crop up again....

Thread: In need of advice - interview in a fortnight

posted
15-Feb-14, 07:39
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posted about 6 years ago
Hi,

I also joined the phd with a funding proposal that my supervisors wrote.

We were lucky to get the funding. My supervisor got then funding for a big new project. So he merged my funding with the new big project changing the initial proposal significantly. I am not sure to what extent you may change ESRC projects, I guess there is flexibility.

I was vaguely interested in the area, and the more worked on my phd the more I loved my subject. After I finish the phd I want to get a job on the same topic, and specialise even further. From my personal experience I would prioritise other factors if you are remotely interested to the subject: do you have a good relationship with your supervisors? (That's a major make or break point)

Is there specialised help available? ( for example your project involves coding and you lack skills).

You get the point. Imagine getting the phd of your dreams in a lab that all equipment breaks and take ages to repair. Or your supervisor is a bully and you cry yourself to sleep every night . Or you need to do this cutting edge analysis that costs a gazillion pounds while your funding is enough for one conference. I ve seen all of them happen to people around me. Not fun.

Good luck.

Thread: I can't find a job - supervisor possbily sabotaging things for me

posted
08-Feb-14, 23:59
edited about 24 seconds later
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posted about 6 years ago
Hi,

is this possible that he is actually "looking out for you?" Academia is a small world, and it doesn't take long to build a bad reputation. In my field there are specific people who are considered "unpredictable" or " they have a chip over their shoulder" and no one ever invites them for vivas.... and some other academics often advertise positions for RA, but friends who have worked with them say they are "bullies", and these are positions I won't even apply for. No thanks, I don't need the boss from hell.

Or maybe, your supervisor doesn't want you to leave because he has a research project lined up?

Thread: My application is unsuccessful

posted
08-Feb-14, 23:44
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posted about 6 years ago
Hi,

just think that when you apply for funding for a project, you will probably spent a month (or even more) to put together a proposal, and your chances are roughly 1 in 5 (in my discipline). Of course, other disciplines have smaller acceptance rates.

So, yeah, welcome to academia...

And don't get me started on job applications... Last year in my department, they probably received 500 applications for 1 lecturer position. Great.

Just keep applying.

Thread: PhD Acknowledgements

posted
04-Feb-14, 21:19
edited about 9 seconds later
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posted about 6 years ago
Hi,

the last page of your frontpages (so basically after nomenclature) can be a dedication page. So you can write the dedication there (separately from the acknowledgments).

Most of the time I am bitter and isolated, and my heart is a dark cold place where dreams die. And I wouldn't write "mummy".

Congrats!!!!!!

Thread: Anyone finishing this year?

posted
30-Jan-14, 15:18
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posted about 6 years ago
Hi TreeofLife,

I am sure you 'll get results soon... I 've seen it happen in the lab often, but at the end it always works out. Seems like your supervisors don't have any concerns, so you 'll be fine.

Just hang in there.
xxx

Thread: How long does it takes you to write thesis

posted
30-Jan-14, 15:13
edited about 15 seconds later
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posted about 6 years ago
Hi Chan,

I was in a similar situation when I started the third year... In the first year I pretty much wrote the literature review and the methodology, and spent most of the second year doing fieldwork.

I think it is possible to write up in the 3rd year. However, I wasted a lot of time playing around with statistics, publishing papers, teaching, going to conferences, organising conferences and writing reports for the industry.

Now, I am halfway in my 4th year, and still haven't finished writing up the thesis. It takes more time than I anticipated. I feel like I have to lock myself in some isolated prison where there is not the temptation of "I ll write one more paper, won't take long".... I suffer from perfectionism too, and nothing is good enough ever. I have probably written about half so far, and have edited these chapters heavily at least three times so far.

The whole process is taking ages, and my supervisor is frustrated (although he is the main source of distraction). I can't give any advice. Maybe I clearly distributed time wrong (because I can't say "no"), or maybe we really need plenty of publications and teaching experience to land a job.

Good luck, hope you will be more efficient than me.

Thread: Supervisor OTT

posted
28-Jan-14, 21:45
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posted about 6 years ago
Hi clarephd,

my second supervisor was like that during my masters. In my first year I received 100 comments on an accepted manuscript. I am 3 and a half year in the PhD, and now I get less comments (only 36 comments in the last accepted manuscript). My supervisor is ALWAYS stricter than the reviewers.

I have also reduced the number of drafts: I used to go through 15 drafts per paper... now I think we go only through 4 or 5. So, I guess I am improving!

But yes, you need to work all the time and NEVER complain.

Thread: Writing thesis - problem with structure

posted
21-Jan-14, 15:01
edited about 13 seconds later
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posted about 6 years ago
Hi Tulip,

I usually write everything I 've done, at first as a very " honest" first draft, and then I let it cool down and come back to it formatting.

Since you ve done a lot of work on optimising the assays IMO it would be a waste not to write them down. Even if you only include them in the Appendix.

Try not to get stressed (which is what possibly worries your sup); my generic advice for writing up is "confident and in control of the process". What I experienced in my first draft was that it felt more like a primary school essay, than a scientific contribution. It is kind of normal that everything seems trivial after working on a project for 3-4 years day in day out.

Good luck

Thread: writer's block

posted
16-Jan-14, 19:31
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posted about 6 years ago
I agree with Tree of Life, it seems to be the best approach to create a first draft.

Set an alarm clock for half an hour and start writing whatever you know on the subject. If you cannot think about anything related to your PhD, start writing down whatever is in your mind.

We used to do an exercise with a friend of mine: we would go to a cafe in the morning, and we were not allowed to order coffee until we wrote 500 words (no judgement on the quality).

Thread: Social Sciences PhD - How war along were u after 1yr/2yrs into your PhD?

posted
15-Jan-14, 01:02
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posted about 6 years ago
Hi AnnJolie,

this topic has been covered before. In short during the first year you should have:

-defined research questions
-a good grip of the literature (a good first draft at least)
- a well-defined methodology ( a good first draft)
-sorted out ethics approval
-contacted participants/ organised fieldwork
- a pilot study

In the second year you should:
- collect your data
-clear data,
-decide on your (statistical) analysis
-apply for a conference

This plan will allow you to analyse your data, write up the PhD and prepare some publications in the third year. Of course, every PhD is different.

Hope this helps.

Thread: Employer consent when carrying out research with employees

posted
15-Jan-14, 00:51
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posted about 6 years ago
Hi AnnJolie,

depends on the type of the research you are doing. If you are collecting sensitive data you will need ethics approval.
Check with the ethics committee in your university or ask your supervisor. Some senior academics with lots of experience can guide you too.

Keep in mind that if you need approval, you can only apply when your methodology and questionnaire is finalised. They go through EVERY detail.

Thread: I really need to take my phd seriously

posted
13-Jan-14, 13:29
edited about 12 seconds later
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posted about 6 years ago
Hi,

I agree with Piju. Things evolve out of your control.

My advice is to write down what you want to do and why. Scripta manent. Writing is a more effective form of communication, your point goes through.

My supervisor is the best (no complaints really). But I gave him a draft of my methodology recently, where I stated the weakness of a specific method we used. He said " why didn't you tell me about these limitations beforehand?"
" I did"
"Where is the email?"
*I slam the door and go crying in the bathroom* Of course he doesn't remember, we had that conversation 2 years ago.
You get my point.

Thread: Wishing I had quit 18 months ago but too late now!

posted
12-Jan-14, 16:36
edited about 24 seconds later
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posted about 6 years ago
Hi serenstar,

I agree with Montanina, it is up to you when you will finish; I guess your supervisors provided only an estimation.

Moreover, it is very common for people to finish at 4 years rather than 3, and it is not the end of the world. I am currently 3 and a half years in. I still have a lot of writing up to do, and the whole process seems endless. I managed to extend my funding until June, which takes a lot of pressure off. There are some funding schemes in the universities for completing students. Hope you will get something.

Seems you are in a good track, as you have almost completed the data collection, which is the hardest part of the process. Try not to despair. Keep a positive attitude. Especially during the write-up you need to be happy and in control of the process. If you work hard and concentrated, it is possible to finish analysis and deliver a first draft by the end of the year.

You also need to keep in mind that from the first draft until the viva is a long process. Leave negative thoughts aside and keep swimming.

Thread: Turning into a Pudding!

posted
11-Jan-14, 23:09
edited about 13 seconds later
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posted about 6 years ago
Hey BevCha,

welcome back. Glad to hear you are having a good time!

First, I would like to express a very personal opinion, that weight is just a number, and is only a crude indication of health.

One suggestion I would like to make is NOT to start with running, as it can put a lot of strain on your knees and ankles. If I were you I would start with swimming that is gentle for the body, and brings you slowly into a good physical condition. More important, find a balance between work and play (easier said than done) : take the weekends off and go for hiking and rowing.

Well, the rest you probably know already :) Eat your veggies, and cut down on sugar (we are all addicts) blah blah :)

Have fun
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