Basic engineering

A blog by eng77

Born with disability

by eng77
on November 29, 2019
When people are born and raised healthy, in most cases they do not realise how others that born with a disability suffer. This is also the case when postgraduate students from a "developing" country suffer, most EU students have no idea of how they see things.
Born in such country is a huge unseen disability. What are your chances if you want to do postgraduate study and research in "real" institutions? What are your chances to get a decent job utilising your education and skills?
You have to go to the formalities and pay the international tuition fees. One goal for most "international" postgraduate students is to continue living in the country they study at.
Actually they search for new home. They have a target to achieve. They want to get a residence permit then a permanent residence permit then a citizenship to match a "normal" person who was born in the EU, Canada or Australia. I recall a conversation with a PhD student and I asked him if he got the citizenship of the country of the university, he replied unfortunately no. He said citizenship is more important than PhD! I do not agree with him but I would also say getting a EU citizenship is "equivalent" or close to the same achievement of obtaining a PhD.
I do not have any solution or suggestion but I wanted to highlight some troubles that are not usually seen by healthy people.

Comments

posted
02-Dec-19, 11:25
by rewt
Avatar for rewt
posted about 1 week ago
I completely agree with this. Even though I am one of the lucky few with dual British/EU citizenship I can see this problem. It is stupid that you can come to a country, get a PhD, become a specialist in a field and integrate into society to be told to go home. I wish there was some automatic mechanism for postgraduate students to get a permanent visa and pathway to citizenship. However if that was the case the universities would have to tighten up international student requirements. Unfortunately the UK appears to becoming one the worst offenders with tight immigration and I don't see it changing any time soon.
posted
02-Dec-19, 13:16
by eng77
Avatar for eng77
posted about 1 week ago
Hi rewt. I also do not have a solution to this dilemma. Everyone speaks English and wants to come and stay in the UK. Should they tighten or loosen the rules? I do not know honestly. What was bad is opening all doors to EU immigrants so that people "hated" the word immigrants and shutting doors for "some" international immigrants. At the end, we came to the Brexit with neither British, nor EU nor non-EU citizens happy with.
posted
02-Dec-19, 20:51
edited about 1 second later
by rewt
Avatar for rewt
posted about 1 week ago
I think there is also the problem that UK universities are poorly regulated. There is a grade inflation problem where universities are encouraged to accept and pass as many students as possible. If there was a potential visa attached to your university degree universities would have to be regulated to a higher degree. The universities will never agree to more regulation and so national governments will never give PhD students an automatic to citizenship.

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