Overview of Mackem_Beefy

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Mackem_Beefy
Monday, 13 September 2010 at 6:14pm
Wednesday, 3 July 2019 at 1:26pm
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page 1 of 85 recent posts

Thread: The disposable academic - (interesting reading)

posted
09-Apr-15, 09:56
edited about 27 seconds later
Avatar for Mackem_Beefy
posted about 4 years ago
Quote From DocInsanity:
There definitely needs to be some realism about what getting a PhD will do for the graduate student. It certainly ISN'T a passport to academia, and shouldn't be sold as that. I totally agree that there is an element of exploitation to the way PhD students are utilised to maximise research output in some fields.


I'll read later when I have time, however, the words "cheap labour" are already entering my head.

Ian

Thread: Can you defer entry on a PHD?

posted
01-Apr-15, 14:32
edited about 24 seconds later
Avatar for Mackem_Beefy
posted about 4 years ago
Yes, though as mentioned be prepared possibly to lose funding. The project may be offered to someone else, delayed further because funding has to be reapplied for or cancelled on refunding to funding body.

Alternatively, the student may be allowed to proceed as self-funded, with the student being left either to fork out themselves or apply and / or look for funding themselves.

A better option if you really need to delay is possibly to start the project, see how it goes then suspend for six months (plus statutory maternity leave if this is the reason) avoiding the loss of funding.

Ian

Thread: How do you make money while doing a full-time PhD?

posted
30-Mar-15, 08:51
edited about 24 seconds later
Avatar for Mackem_Beefy
posted about 4 years ago
Quote From Eds:
Quote From DocInsanity:
Go the Brooke Magnanti way and make £££££ in your spare time! ;)



:-)

I read that article the other day. Apparently there are more male students in the sex industry than female.

Funding models seriously need to be looked at to avoid situations where students feel the need to sell their bodies to fund their way through University.

I know of other instances where students submit their bodies to medical tests in drug trials. A quick Google suggest payments of £2,500, not money to be sniffed at if you're broke.


Ian

Thread: is it advisable to work while doing a PhD?

posted
27-Mar-15, 13:17
edited about 12 seconds later
Avatar for Mackem_Beefy
posted about 4 years ago
Which is more important to you? I would not continue on your current path or you're not going to be able to do justice to either.

Some people do work part-time during PhD out of financial necessity, however, I don't see how you can make time for both a full-time PhD and a full-time job. One or the other needs to be part-time to give yourself the best chance.

The time commitment required from me was extremely heavy, especially towards the end. I personally could not have continued in a full-time job (probably not even a part-time job) and done justice to my PhD.

Ian

Thread: PhD in Cranfield with a 2:2 (beng)

posted
25-Mar-15, 17:56
edited about 4 seconds later
Avatar for Mackem_Beefy
posted about 4 years ago
So is anyone else able to offer a little extra help to the Geordie lad asking for assistance or is he going to have to be satisfied with the help of a Mackem? :-) :-) :-)

Ian

Thread: Does anyone have experience with 'PhD by published work.'

posted
24-Mar-15, 12:04
edited about 5 minutes later
Avatar for Mackem_Beefy
posted about 4 years ago
Quote From SpiritDoc:
Hi, I am an American university professor (and journalist) who is trying to find a British university programme where I can earn a "PhD by published work." Do you know anything about this?


From memory, "PhD by Published Work" was only available to an alumni or current employee of a British University. The exact wording in the regulations of my former University are:

"Applicants for the award of PhD by Published Work will normally be limited to members of
the University, or its alumni. Individuals with an existing formal academic association with
the University may also seek to apply."

The only exception I've found to this (though there may be others) is the University of Bolton, which outside the UK offers "PhD by Published Work" via New York College.
In the above instance by first class degree or equivalent, you would need a first class degree (pr high GPA scoring degree in the USA) or alternatively a second class degree plus Masters.

Would not a better option be to take a PhD part-time alongside your employment at your current establishment? I'm wondering if any "PhD by Published Work" qualification you might gain might not be readily recognised in the USA.

Alternatively, do you have any strong associations to a UK institution?

Ian

Thread: PhD in Cranfield with a 2:2 (beng)

posted
23-Mar-15, 18:39
Avatar for Mackem_Beefy
posted about 4 years ago
Quote From sr25:
The EngD project is 4 years long, I'am not sure if it includes a masters, but i think there is a possibility. I would be perfectly fine in that case as anyway.

The thing is, i did ask the supervisor first and told him that i was a 2(ii) hons grad, but he told me to apply anyway. When i did, and uploaded my transcripts on the formal application form on thi Uni's website, the admis office said it meets their requirements.

I know its odd, but Cranfield uni is the only place i have ever seen that both states that they consider lower second honors degrees, even less than a second class degree if you have masters and/or industrial experience. (i was told this by over the phone when i called to check). All other unis have a 2(i) only policy. Like when i applied for a project in Sheffield, i was told by the supervisor that he cannot take my application further as the school only accepts a 2(i) or 2(ii) and a masters.


Ah, it's an EngD project. This means there'll be a taught component during the first year and there's probably an industrial or other sponsor you have the chance to work with. I'm still unsure how this afffects entry requirements, however, if you're in with a shot then don't knock it. :-)

Whilst some people are still unsure what and EngD is, there's the possibility you'll later obtain employment with an industrial sponsor. Even if this does not occur, what little I understand suggests you'll have a slight advantage over standard PhD once you explain what extra an EngD gives you.

Good luck!!!

Ian

Thread: PhD in Cranfield with a 2:2 (beng)

posted
23-Mar-15, 13:29
Avatar for Mackem_Beefy
posted about 4 years ago
If you manage to get in, so be it. I was a 2(ii) ages back (I'm known to freeze in exams) but with two Masters (long story involving health issues - health affected first one, thought I'd failed, started second one, found I'd passed the first one after all), I finally got into a PhD and obtained it with minor corrections quite a while ago.

At the time I got my first degree, my understanding was you could do post-grad study with a 2(ii), but you were not likely to obtain funding unless you had a 2(i). My Masters studies were done without funding from a usual source (parental help with the first, compensation for an accdient for the second). Since then, 2(i) or degree (usually 2(ii) or better) plus masters had become a lower benchmark, this arguably down to the much highernumbers of people entering higher education and thus more choice for potential supervisors.

In your situation, if you are finally accepted with a 2(ii) then I would find this very surprising and especially somewhere like Cranfield. Cranfield is a post-grad only Uni. with a reasonable standing, which is why I'd expect them to ask you for an additional Masters qualification.

The above suggests one of the following:

1) They are considering your application as per their regulations and thus the point where your 2(ii) is questioned has not been reached. I would be prepared at this stage to prepare yourself for rejection.

2) The other possibility you have not made clear is you might have applied for a 1 + 3 route, in that you do a year of masters then progress to PhD. Even then, I'd usually expect 2(i) to be considered minium for this to be funded.

--------

On the basis of what you have said, is not to raise your hopes just yet and mentally prepare yourself to be rejected. If you really do dream of doing a PhD, I would start looking at Masters as a step towards this.

Ian

Thread: The stigma of failing - implications for future study/employment

posted
20-Mar-15, 19:26
edited about 12 seconds later
Avatar for Mackem_Beefy
posted about 4 years ago
Cuagan,

Sorry to hear.

I pick up on your comment you feel you wern't prepared going into the PhD. I'll answer that by saying no-one knows how to do a PhD until they have done one.

You also comment on it going wrong. How did it go wrong? Was it a viable project to begin with? If viable, what happened that stopped the project being viable? Did it transpire later the project wasn't viable? Could you have done things differently? Could others have acted differently in supporting the project?

In asking these questions you can build a case as to what you have learnt from you PhD attempt and what you would do differently to make a future project a success. This can include your approach, your interactions with others, your approach to methodology and experimental design, etc., so you can present yourself in a more positive light in interview.

You want to remain in an academic environment, thus I would present this PhD as PenPen suggests as not being for you. Don't say PhDs in general are not for you, as you may in future have the opportunity to study a PhD part-time alongside a future Research Assistant position.

I note Dr. Jeckel's comment on not mentioning it was a PhD attempt, rather an Research Assistant position. It's a sentiment I understand as I know it has been suggested elsewhere that leaving a Phd (successful or otherwise) off a CV can make a job candidate seem less overqualified. However, I'm wary of such a claim as whilst some will be understanding of this position if they later find out, it can also be seen as dishonesty by others.

Ian

Thread: UK Chancellor announces loans for PhDs (yes, really)

posted
19-Mar-15, 15:26
Avatar for Mackem_Beefy
posted about 4 years ago
Quote From Mark_B:
Hi Ian

The statement you've quoted is based on the Budget documents - part of the consultation process will involve working with 'research councils, universities and industry to examine how best to design them [the new loans] so that they compliment existing funding streams and continue to support the most excellent research.'

There's plenty we could extrapolate from that (and from other parts of the announcement) but it looks like we'll have to wait for the details.

Speaking *entirely for myself* here, I agree that a broad shift from public funding to personal debt would be concerning.


Just remember this is a largely Tory government we have in power and looking at the polls, I reckon they could scrape an outright win come May 2015. I wouldn't put a long term shift from public funding to personal debt past them.

Thread: UK Chancellor announces loans for PhDs (yes, really)

posted
19-Mar-15, 15:12
edited about 3 seconds later
Avatar for Mackem_Beefy
posted about 4 years ago
Is this to offer funding for people pursuing PhDs who have not found a funded PhD or is the loan model meant to replace bursary funded PhDs as offered by charities and the research councils?

This may be for now a rhetorical question as I'm suspicious of the statement "These new loans will be available in addition to existing forms of PhD funding and will be designed to compliment support from research councils, universities and industry."

It would be good if on reaching Year 4 (as most us did, have done or will do), a loan could be obtained to pay the bills whilst we finish writing up. However, I have strong opinions about loan funding for higher education in general (i.e. I'm opposed to it) and sense possible creep towards loan funding being the standard model for all UK post-grad education.

Ian

Thread: At what stage does your project stop changing?

posted
17-Mar-15, 13:38
Avatar for Mackem_Beefy
posted about 4 years ago
Although supervision and environment was good, my supervisor kept chopping and changing until the beginning of write-up. My one annoyance with the project, you could say.

Ian

Thread: PhD Offer: Should I Accept, Defer, Suspend, Reject?

posted
17-Mar-15, 13:35
Avatar for Mackem_Beefy
posted about 4 years ago
Quote From samhort:
I've been given a firm offer to start a PhD at my alma mater on a topic of great interest to me, which the school is also world renowned for their work within. This offer is likely to have a scholarship attached, covering all my fees and also offering a reasonable level of maintenance. The perfect opportunity, except...

I am also following the route to becoming a barrister (legal advocate), and am having enough success to be confident enough to apply to take the Bar exam. This must be done within 5 years from completion of your undergraduate law degree, and cannot be taken after this deadline.

This leaves me with a dillema. If I take the PhD, I will start this summer (2015) and complete in July 2018. This would mean a start date for the Bar exams of September 2018, but unfortunately this is 2 months past the deadline. However, even if I don't start the PhD, I cannot begin the Bar exams until September 2016 and completing in July m2017, leaving me a whole year free.

I am wondering about the possibility of somehow still doing both, but obviously cannot defer my start for 2 years. I therefore wonder whether it is possible to suspend my PhD for a year part way through in order to take the Bar exams (would this mean losing the scholarship funding?). It seems my only other option is to reject the PhD in order to take the Bar exam. Anyone have any thoughts?


The above for me is an absolute no brainer. Take the bar exam as this is your bread and butter.

If you feel you want to tackle a PhD later, then revisit this option at a time that suits you once the bar exam is complete.

I know this means losing the funding, but I'm sure other funded projects will come along. Also, once qualified, the money you'll be raking in cannot be ignored. Time permitting, you could look at PhD part-time once qualified and practising.

Ian

Thread: honorary doctorats

posted
11-Mar-15, 15:28
Avatar for Mackem_Beefy
posted about 4 years ago
I'm not decrying people who've done well or served their community as many thoroughly deserve some sort of honour.

However, whilst I appreciate the honorary award is being bestowed for such outstanding achievement, there are people who've worked damn hard for 4 or more years to obtain a qualification demonstrating excellence and original thought in there chosen field. That is not a claim an honorary doctorate can make.

If we are talking about the UK, there are Freedom of City awards, etc. to honour local, non-academic achievement. At national level, there's the Birthday's Honours List.

Ian

Thread: honorary doctorats

posted
10-Mar-15, 16:09
edited about 18 seconds later
Avatar for Mackem_Beefy
posted about 4 years ago
This must be the first time I've said this on here, but queue twenty pages of rants about devaluing real doctorates. :-)

Ian
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