Overview of Mackem_Beefy

Overview

Avatar for Mackem_Beefy
Mackem_Beefy
Monday, 13 September 2010 at 6:14pm
Wednesday, 3 July 2019 at 1:26pm
1862
Login to send a private message to Mackem_Beefy
page 1 of 85 recent posts

Thread: In a complicated affair with supervisor

posted
10-Mar-15, 10:21
edited about 9 seconds later
Avatar for Mackem_Beefy
posted about 4 years ago
Quote From Babygirl:
Hi everyone, thanks for your kind advice. Unfortunately changing supervisors is out of it now, as I have come quite far with my research and I can't start afresh. I will just try to be careful, wise and hopefully resolve this issue tactfully.

As for the choice of name, that was just on a whim, the first thing that came to mind. LOL. Babygirl is not my pet name. Though I must confess he has once called me his baby. *sigh*

Thanks again. This forum and you guys are the best.


Okay, your decision, but I hope you know what you're doing. If you do have feelings for him and clearly he has feelings for you, then 2 to 3 years is a long time to resist temptation so to speak. I've already given anecdotal stories of what could happen.

In my case, it was just the last few months of a Masters I had to pull back from my feelings for the woman concerned. If it had been my PhD later on, given I submitted at the end of the four years allowable then life would have been much, much harder.

Ian

Thread: Question about self-funding a PhD project

posted
07-Mar-15, 12:38
Avatar for Mackem_Beefy
posted about 4 years ago
I agree with HazyJane. If this is a UK sxience project, it seems very unusual for there to be no funding in place unless you have proposed the project yourself.

I know of one case where someone was offered a science PhD without funding in place at a top University. When they were offered a suitable project at another university with very good funding terms, the top University PhD place at that time was obviously left unfilled.

Costs if they'd taken this PhD? £9,000 a year for 3 years min, £1,000 min a month in lab consumables for 2 of those years min, making it £51,000 before living costs and accomodation were even accounted for. For a self-funded science PhD, that comes to £75,000 total minimum.

I'll add that once you start withoutout funding, I seem to get the impression rightly or wrongly that some organisations might be less inclined to offer funding, the thinking being you've the resources to continue and thus you're data will be available at the end (electronic repositories, access via the British Library) without them having to pay a penny. There is the counter-argument, however, that if you show interesting early results that this may encourage someone to step in with at least partial funding (the operative word being partial).

I would strongly advise you waited for funding to look for a project you're interested in with funding in place. You do not want to find yourself say almost a year in, the project going well and have to withdraw with nothing to show due to lack of resurces and significant debt.

Ian

Thread: 3rd class degree

posted
05-Mar-15, 13:46
edited about 1 minute later
Avatar for Mackem_Beefy
posted about 4 years ago
You are in a difficult position with only a 3rd class degree, as that's not normally enough to be accepted onto a Masters course. As TomS says, be prepared to explain how you only got a 3rd and why you have the potential to succeed on their course.

However, there are other approaches - note I can only vouch for the UK model.

1) Contact the University where you did your degree. You may be able to resit the last year or just the exams for the last year a year later. Note, however, you may face a ceiling on the mark you can receive. In the UK, Universities set this at 50% although this is sufficient for a 2(ii). My feelings are this may be your best option.

However, if you look at this option then I would do the last year resit (entire year or just exams) as soon as possible after your initial degree as the University may set a time limit for this to happen.

2) Many Masters courses (at least in the UK) have a PostGrad Diploma option. This is offered in the UK to people with UK Higher National Certificates and Higher National Diplomas. This should also be available to people with 3rd class degrees.

At some point during your studies, you may be offered the chance to upgrade to the full Masters provided your marks are sufficiently high (I know of this happening to two people). Alternatively, the Postgrad Diploma on it's own might set you up to apply for a Masters at a later date.

3) Relevant significant works experience, say five years, may also be considered as an entry qualification for a Masters. However, even with this extra works experience you may initially have to start as a PostGrad Diploma student hoping to upgrade.

------------

I'll add a few years relevant works experience will strengthen your hand in all three cases, though relying on relevant works experience alone may lengthen the period before reasonable likelihood of acceptance onto a Masters course.

Ian

Thread: Newcastle vs Aberdeen

posted
05-Mar-15, 12:00
edited about 18 seconds later
Avatar for Mackem_Beefy
posted about 4 years ago
Looking at the above, I think there's little to pick between them. Both have companies situated locally working on renewable and green energy. Both have international reputations. Both names are recognisable internationally.

I can vouch Newcastle is a cheaper city to live in than Aberdeen coming from the NE of England myself, but I would not make this your main criteria for study. The prospects after you finish the course are far more important. To reiterate Caro's comments, it might be worth checking with companies which M.Sc. will be most attractive to them.

If possible, is there an open day where you can visit both campuses and meet some of the staff who'll be teaching you?

Ian

Thread: In a complicated affair with supervisor

posted
04-Mar-15, 12:04
Avatar for Mackem_Beefy
posted about 4 years ago
Quote From Eds:
Apologies to all, and thanks for that awsoci. I was being deliberately cretinous, but with no intention to offend anyone here!


I have to admit if this appeared on a football forum called SMB I inhabit, keeping the wind-up merchants at bay would be a problem. However, in this case, we have to be here to help as people do come here with many a problem.

Back in context (and hope here I'm helping), I hope the OP sorts out her situation and is able to continue with her studies. I genuinely feel for her and this can't be a comfortable situation.

I'll admit I had a crush on a female lecturer way back during Masters who'd been kind to me during a difficult period. I found myself trying to find excuses to be in her company even though I knew then and know now It's all too easy to construe sympathy with affection.

I used my common sense, pulled back, and stopped myself from allowing any feelings for this woman to develop knowing there's be no chance of anything happening and endangering my Masters at the same time.

Ian

Thread: In a complicated affair with supervisor

posted
03-Mar-15, 13:12
Avatar for Mackem_Beefy
posted about 4 years ago
Quote From Eds:
Mind you- WTF, identifying as 'Babygirl'?!?!?


That sounds like a pet name someone would have for a lover or someone they were seeking to have a relationship with.

If he's calling her that, taking note of what I've already said, then she really needs to withdraw from this situation at the earliest opportunity. :-|

Ian

Thread: A Phd project? what is that?

posted
02-Mar-15, 16:05
edited about 24 seconds later
Avatar for Mackem_Beefy
posted about 4 years ago
Chen,

I prepared a blog for students a long time ago to explain the PhD process from a UK perspective. Hopefully it will be of help to you.

As others have said, if you see a funded PhD offered the proposal process in order to obtain that funding has already been carried out by the University concerned. You are thus applying for the PhD as you would for a job (CV plus covering letter or alternatively University application form for the position).

As funding is already in place, competition for funded PhDs can be quite intense as it would be for some sort after jobs.

You only forward a proposal when you are designing your own project to a University / and or funding body in the hope it will be accepted.

Ian

Thread: In a complicated affair with supervisor

posted
02-Mar-15, 13:50
edited about 24 seconds later
Avatar for Mackem_Beefy
posted about 4 years ago
Oh boy, what a mess.

I would suggest you don't go there given two very similar stories I know of from the past, which didn't end well. One was a senior female, who had a relationship with a male student. Another was a lesbian staff / student relationship.

In both cases the relationship was discovered, the former in spectacular fashion when said couple were caught in flagrante and in full throws of passion. In both cases, the senior partner in the relationship was encouraged to leave quietly or face full disciplinary proceedings for abuse of position.

In the former case, I believe the male student was allowed to complete his studies, however, was expected to leave once his studies were complete. I don't know what happened in the latter case, though again an uncomfortable time would no doubt be had by said young lady.

Put simply, the damage to both member of staff and student was heavy, in that the staff member lost their job and the student had no future at said establishment.

If you do embark on an affair with your supervisor, be very aware of the consequences and not just the potential professional damage. In both the examples I quote, the senior player in the relationship was single. In your case, it would be a married man. It is thus just not you and him, but also his wife and family.

I personally would look if possible to break ties with your supervisor as sooner or later, your mutual feelings will again flare into view with so long to go. If there's someone else who can supervise you, I'd look to move on to be honest. If after that a relationship does happen, then at least you're no longer supervisor and student.

Ian

Thread: How do I know I'm good enough for PhD level after being out of uni for a while?

posted
24-Feb-15, 08:10
edited about 15 seconds later
Avatar for Mackem_Beefy
posted about 4 years ago
The "Mackem_Beefy" is because I had a season ticket at Sunderland for years. I'm probably closer to a Woollyback (west of County Durham). :-)

There's another two Sunderland people on here who very rarely post. I admit I'm not on here so often now as I'm long since past, but pop by from time to time.

What's your connection with Sunderland?

Ian

Thread: Has anyone contested their corrections post-viva?!

posted
24-Feb-15, 08:04
edited about 6 seconds later
Avatar for Mackem_Beefy
posted about 4 years ago
I'll be blunt and succinct.

You can:

1) Do the corrections your examiners want and be awarded your PhD.

or:

2) Dispute or not do the corrections and leave with an MPhil or a fail.

You decide. :-)

Ian

Thread: Finding a phd

posted
23-Feb-15, 15:46
edited about 53 seconds later
Avatar for Mackem_Beefy
posted about 4 years ago
http://www.findaphd.com/

...is the obvious place to start looking. However, check the small print and ensure the PhD is fully funded.

You might also want to check the vacancies on individual University websites.

As regards other questions you might have and other general advice, by all means take a look at my blog.
Ian

Thread: How do I know I'm good enough for PhD level after being out of uni for a while?

posted
23-Feb-15, 15:40
edited about 2 minutes later
Avatar for Mackem_Beefy
posted about 4 years ago
I also had a five year gap, but between Masters and PhD. I just slotted back in, as I'd done a lot of project and research-type work during masters.

If anything, the time out helped as I'd grown up a bit more by the time I started it. As a PhD student, it's no longer about trailing around for lectures and to me at least it was like a job with the obvious exception that I enjoyed it, especially the science.

Perhaps a read of my blog might help.

http://www.wearthesis.talktalk.net

Ian

Thread: PhD's: worth the risk based on a dream of academia?

posted
09-Feb-15, 11:29
edited about 13 seconds later
Avatar for Mackem_Beefy
posted about 4 years ago
Doing a PhD self-funded is quite risky, especially if you come out of it at the other end with nothing to show.

If you had funding, I'd have said give it a go and see how you feel six month to a year in.

Have you considered part time whilst working?

Ian

Thread: I'm ready to submit - or am I - yes I am - but wait, am I?

posted
09-Feb-15, 11:26
Avatar for Mackem_Beefy
posted about 4 years ago
Submit if feel you can't do anything more substantial. Don't torture yourself.

I was glad to see the back of mine and was able then to press on with viva preparation.

Ian

Thread: Who's doing the weirdest PhD?

posted
06-Feb-15, 14:58
Avatar for Mackem_Beefy
posted about 4 years ago
Time to revive this again.

Another oddball PhD. This lass became a burlesque dancer as part of her PhD studies.
Ian
page 1 of 85 recent posts

Postgraduate
Forum

Copyright ©2018
All rights reserved

Postgraduate Forum

Masters Degrees

PhD Opportunities

PostgraduateForum is a trading name of FindAUniversity Ltd
FindAUniversity Ltd, 77 Sidney St, Sheffield, S1 4RG, UK. Tel +44 (0) 114 268 4940 Fax: +44 (0) 114 268 5766