Overview of Pjlu

Overview

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Pjlu
Tuesday, 22 December 2009 at 8:10pm
Monday, 29 January 2018 at 7:37pm
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Thread: Masters dissertation query

posted
01-Aug-17, 11:57
edited about 24 seconds later
by Pjlu
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posted about 2 years ago
Hi Helebon, my thoughts would be to send it to the supervisor 3 weeks before due date, as their request and try to work on minor things in the meantime as you have indicated in your second post. Revising and checking references, polishing up stuff that needs to be fixed. This last part of the process tends to be a part where your control is limited. You can't control how long it will take your supervisor, you can't control how they will read it and what they will focus on.

It can be frustrating having to wait around but sometimes it is just what happens. I'm currently doing just this as my second supervisor reads and checks my thesis prior to sign off. It is a little later than I would like it to be but not much can be done and I know she won't sign off on anything until she has gone through it and indicated any last minutes changes she wants me to make before submission. Good luck with it all :)

Thread: The Dreaded Theoretical Framework

posted
31-Jul-17, 11:21
edited about 24 seconds later
by Pjlu
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posted about 2 years ago
Hi there, my thoughts are that your theoretical lens is just that, a lens through which you view or interpret your findings. Your findings will be influenced or shaped by your theoretical perspective but ultimately the findings are what are important, and your theory is a methodological tool or process that leads your to your findings which form your final thesis.

Along the way you will need to address the theory more than once- substantially in your lit review in its own section, then from time to time in a form of integrated manner as you explain and interpret the findings and then again in a lesser way at the end when you discuss and conclude.

(I'm basing this on my own epistemological battles and experiences, but this is my understanding of the process, so it might be helpful-or not.)

Thread: Should I stay or should I leave my PhD?

posted
27-Jul-17, 22:14
edited about 50 seconds later
by Pjlu
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posted about 2 years ago
Hi Joe, good advice from Tru there. I can't offer any specific tips for biochemistry. What I would like to say though is if you take the specifics out of your post-biochemistry, simulations and computer coding and focus on other aspects-paper rejected, feeling miserable and lost, year 3, don't like your topic anymore-your post reads as if you are in a classic stage of the journey that many of us go through. (It feels like a very personal and isolating experience when going through it however).

Many of us experience these phenomena while doing a PhD and paper rejection is unfortunately common for both PhD students and experienced academics alike. Can you just dust it off and try some other journals? Or perhaps you can worry about publishing once you are close to or just about finishing. When you get close to the end, sometimes all you have energy for is to finish. Plenty of time to look at publishing at the end stages when you are just waiting on supervisors to sign you off or for examiner's reports.

Do you think that maybe following Tru's suggestion,to finalise experiments and write up so you are now working towards the end goal, would work for you? Can you make sure you are also doing some things in life you enjoy as well so life doesn't seem as if the only thing that matters is the PhD. See friends, go to movies or the pub sometimes, or play a sport or computer games or similar, so there are little things to look forward to?

PS: Very much understand how miserable you might be feeling, but you have come so far now and are so close to the finish, can you keep going?

Thread: How do you keep notes on your PhD learning?

posted
27-Jul-17, 08:08
edited about 9 seconds later
by Pjlu
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posted about 2 years ago
Hi everyone,

Tudor for my Intro, Lit review and methods chapters, I made notes in notebooks (the old fashioned way) and felt that these could have been better. When it came to data it was a bit different because to keep on top of all of the data I had to make tables, summaries and keep coded transcripts, plus initial analyses as digital documents.

Then once I went back to final discussion and analysis, I used the scrappy notebook system again. On retrospect it wasn't always scrappy, (we are all our own harshest critics) sometimes it was well done and other times not (depending on life and the PhD at the time). I felt totally inadequate about it all for quite some time.

While writing up however, especially through the final drafting stages I have become more confident in my knowledge of the topic. For me this happened at the stage when you have to keep on going back and comparing notes and original drafts with what you are saying as you finalise things at the end points. There are times in the process when data just seems to swim about, as do references but these don't last and you do become more confident.

You notice it towards the end when your supervisors are making suggestions for clarification and you go "oh no, it can't be said that way, because that would imply this or that and that isn't what the data says". At that point you realise you do know a bit about it. Take care, its a mucky stage but it passes. :)

Thread: Changing University after Starting a PhD?

posted
26-Jul-17, 21:35
edited about 5 minutes later
by Pjlu
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posted about 2 years ago
HI ema, my thoughts are that you need to do what is best for you in this situation. You have not been in this current PhD for very long (just a few months), you have reservations about it and one of the supervisors anyway, this opportunity has arisen and it appears to be more suitable and offer better prospects. If it is the best pathway for you right now, then go for it.

Yes, sticking with things and seeing things through is an important quality for many things in life. However, we all have the right to change our minds and if something better lies ahead, then being flexible and changing our course to access this possibility makes sense.

If you honestly don't mind (seriously) doing the Masters and the extra 6 months, and you see more opportunity for yourself in doing this, then go for it. Your supervisors will understand.

PS: You might want to secure the new position before cancelling the old though: just as in standard job hunting practice.

Thread: Must I have a particular passion before starting a PhD?

posted
25-Jul-17, 12:09
edited about 17 seconds later
by Pjlu
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posted about 2 years ago
The only qualifications I would make to the advice given, is to pass on advice given to me by my past and present supervisors. If you do find you have a genuine passion or strong interest in a specific focus then this absorbing interest can often help sustain you through the difficult periods that come up throughout the PhD. And, while you may begin with the broad outlook, you will need to be thinking about the gaps in the research or an interesting problem or event you wish to explore, so starting to think (even in very sketchy sorts of ways) about this might assist you in finding a focus if you need to write a proposal or application.

Thread: PhD thesis and fake results on papers

posted
24-Jul-17, 21:42
edited about 23 seconds later
by Pjlu
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posted about 2 years ago
Guaio1, how long have you known that these data are fake? Is it only recently or has it been for a while? If this matter came to light and it was being investigated or there was some form of review, you might be asked these questions. It is a serious ethical and practical dilemma you are in, and I agree with the others in that you do need to distance yourself from your supervisor and any false data and claims made. (Including ensuring your thesis does not rely on any of this data).

Is there any way you might be able to get some legal advice on this issue?

Thread: coding data for action research

posted
23-Jul-17, 21:57
edited about 21 seconds later
by Pjlu
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posted about 2 years ago
PS: I've realised that you said you are using 'action research', as your method? I think once you have collected data and processed and analysed, you have to apply it to your problem and then go through the process again? (To see whether this impacts on the issue). Not sure as haven't used this method. I've used case study and mixed methods-data processing was latent thematic analysis (Braun and Clarke, 2006).

Thread: coding data for action research

posted
23-Jul-17, 21:32
edited about 19 minutes later
by Pjlu
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posted about 2 years ago
Hi there, what you are talking about sounds okay. However, usually once you have completed an initial set of coding, based on your identified themes (from the literature), you would then have further steps to take, depending on which methodology you are using. You would also see, when you code (using your identified themes) whether new material or data. relevant to your research questions are present (themes that don't fit into your preconceived framework) and create codes for these as you may need to explain how these either support or challenge your framework.

Generally, you would not stop at an initial coding and fitting into themes-this process would occur several times, and you would keep reducing and simplifying your list of codes and data into around 6 major themes, which address your research questions and can be discussed in sections.

However, you do need to match this part of the process to your underpinning theory. I would check with your supervisor, usually they have a good grasp of methods and will let you know if you are on track or not. Good luck SU3AD. It can be a confusing process when you are immersed in the data.

Thread: Postgrad Forum Hall of Fame

posted
22-Jul-17, 08:21
edited about 1 minute later
by Pjlu
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posted about 2 years ago
Quote From Sudipta:
Hi all, I am a PhD student and going to submit my thesis within 2 months. I keenly wants to pursue Post doc after getting my PhD degree without wasting time. But I am really confused regarding the procedure of post doc application. My queries are given as below,
1. What is the perfect time to start application for Post doc? Should I wait until I submit my thesis then start applying?
2. When can I start applying for post doc scholarship?

Please anyone help me in this matter. I am really confused!


Start applying now I would think. As this thread is mainly used by people who have just graduated, you might want to post your question on a separate thread in the main forum. I think you will get more responses that way. Good luck with it all.

Thread: Postgrad Forum Hall of Fame

posted
22-Jul-17, 08:19
by Pjlu
Avatar for Pjlu
posted about 2 years ago
Quote From litphdgirl:
Hard to believe I'm posting in this thread. I graduated with my PhD last week. It's all over!! 6 years of hell lol. Thanks to everyone on this forum for the camaraderie. Xxx


Well done and congratulations litphdgirl! Hope the celebrations are fun and next year makes up for all the hell experienced in the previous 6!

Thread: Hate/bullying

posted
18-Jul-17, 21:22
edited about 5 seconds later
by Pjlu
Avatar for Pjlu
posted about 2 years ago
Hi Shaimaa, with regard to online counselling, if you google this phrase, you will get a range of sites that appear and the idea is to look through their pages, to select one that has good testimonials and provides information about their counsellors and methods. Many of these sites are run by credible groups who will provide genuine support.

I don't think I can paste links on this forum. I did this once before, pasting a link to a site that I thought would be helpful to a forum member and the post and link was removed as I think I breached copyright rules (unintentionally). It isn't hard to find them though if you look.

Re: Your request regarding information related to counselling and literature on Islamophobia...I do not claim to have experienced this personally so my understanding of how hurtful this might be is intellectual rather than emotional. However an experienced and accredited counsellor would be able to provide you with support to assist with a range of complex issues including prejudice, racism, discrimination and other distressing experiences.

This forum provides excellent support and advice for problems and issues related to postgraduate studies, However for very complex matters that go beyond postgraduate studies often you need to find support from experts outside of the forum. Kind regards and best wishes, P.

Thread: Hate/bullying

posted
17-Jul-17, 21:40
by Pjlu
Avatar for Pjlu
posted about 2 years ago
Hi Shaimaa, very sorry to hear that you have been bullied and of its negative effects on you. Bullying is unfortunately a common and harmful occurrence in schools, institutions and workplaces.

I would have suggested personal counselling to help you regain confidence and to learn strategies that assist with managing the after effects of extreme bullying and its impact on your overall wellbeing and academic confidence. From your post however it reads as if these resources are not available easily perhaps.

However there are many sites online (genuine counselling and support sites) where you can access counselling and support. My experience (as an educator who has responsibility for the pastoral care of high school students) is that students benefit significantly from ongoing counselling in these cases, as well as general support from family, friends and teachers. Well done for your courage and persistence and for not letting this prevent you from an academic career.

Thread: Dissertation Topic

posted
17-Jul-17, 21:31
by Pjlu
Avatar for Pjlu
posted about 2 years ago
Perhaps select a specific time (e.g. year or period) and elaborate on an aspect of the topic after a general introduction. Eg from your 30 percent done and your broad overview, can you identify from the various contributing factors, one factor that would benefit from further elaboration and/or a period of time that relates to this factor in general? Then once you have given your general overview (in the intro chapter), your lit review and research would be focused on this factor and its influence over the whole topic.

Thread: 2ND Master is good?

posted
16-Jul-17, 09:57
by Pjlu
Avatar for Pjlu
posted about 2 years ago
It looks really comprehensive Haluong. I'm not sure exactly how many points of credit you need for each unit...sometimes in Australia these vary and most likely internationally they do so as well. It does seem though that you have a dissertation included worth 21 points of your total of 180? (Around or just under 12% of your course?)

With this MSc, does your university outline future pathways on their webpage for this course? Usually they will indicate whether the dissertation or project might lead to a higher degree research pathway.

I am very sorry, though, I don't think I can say anything more that would be helpful. Perhaps though some others might know more or have experience that helps here. Best wishes, your posts read as if you are really passionate about this, best luck with it all.
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