Overview of Pjlu

Overview

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Pjlu
Tuesday, 22 December 2009 at 8:10pm
Monday, 29 January 2018 at 7:37pm
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page 1 of 58 recent posts

Thread: PhD Finally Finished!

posted
13-Jun-17, 10:26
by Pjlu
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posted about 2 years ago
Congratulations and well done Neferterli! What a great story of persistence and hard work. Very sorry to learn of the sad loss of your father in recent years. I'm sure he would have been so proud of you for sticking it out. Best wishes for your celebrations and future plans.

Thread: Supporting my partner doing a PhD, last 18 months to go (Issues for women)

posted
10-Jun-17, 21:43
edited about 23 seconds later
by Pjlu
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posted about 2 years ago
HI there, Craigwhizz, I think similarly to TfT and HiT in that the support you, or any partner needs to provide is emotional, with perhaps a bit of reading here and there to assist with meaning or minor edits.

The PhD is your partner's not yours and as Time for Tea said so well " distance yourself" from the PhD not your partner. I don't think this is something that is your responsibility to sort out, and I worry that when you have expectations about her meeting deadlines, that you are somehow taking on responsibility for both her and her thesis. (Out of love and caring I know).

All the other matters mentioned in your final paragraph are really between you and your partner, and the PhD seems to be standing in as a symbol for some other things you have concerns about. And these might be something you would wish to discuss with your partner or family or similar. It is a bit like the PhD is the 'elephant in the room' but in saying this, it isn't really about the PhD, there are some underlying issues that surface in this issue with the PhD.

What if you just accepted that your partner's PhD might go over time again and did not accept any responsibility for it whatsoever and left it to her. Would it be possible to do this and refocus on the aspects of the partnership that you both enjoy and appreciate? If lack of money and work are issues for you (as in at some point you would hope that your partner earns an income), this might be a conversation you could have (in terms of timelines and similar), and then leave the rest to her. I'm not sure what you mean when you say, "her scholarship means she cannot work another job ever", so pardon me if I have misinterpreted this. Best wishes, P

Thread: Rewriting your PhD dissertation into a journal article - matters of self-plagiarism

posted
10-Jun-17, 21:21
edited about 10 seconds later
by Pjlu
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posted about 2 years ago
Aspire, this is a topic where it can be easy to be lost in the 'grey'. So I have included a short excerpt from another source that outlines fairly succinctly what you can and can't do when converting an article.

"Additionally, a thesis and a journal article are completely different in terms of overall approach and format. To convert a thesis/dissertation into a journal article, it has to be rewritten and refined. More often, a journal article is crafted based on an excerpt or a chapter of a thesis, and sometimes, multiple articles can be published based on different thesis chapters. The journal article undergoes further revisions during peer review, which makes it substantially different from the thesis, thus solving the problem of duplication. Charges of self-plagiarism can be avoided by citing the thesis/dissertation in the journal paper, and using block quotes wherever content has been copied verbatim.
\Most importantly, you should inform the editor at the time of submission that your article is based on your thesis, mention when and where it has been published, and state your willingness to provide a copy if required."(Editage Insights).

Thread: No reply from PhD supervisor after interview?

posted
10-Jun-17, 07:51
edited about 12 seconds later
by Pjlu
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posted about 2 years ago
Congratulations on the offer Huubte. Are you considering taking this?

Thinking back to your first post -see quoted insert below:
"telling that i am good enough to take the position. I got the reject email but no worry, he would talk to the admission team, he also asked me if i can pay the tuition of the first year."

It may be that you may be able to reapply for scholarships or other grants, after the first year if you do well. Do you think the supervisor might have been referring to this perhaps when he used these words?

I say this, as I have known other students to self fund for a period of time, then apply for other grants to assist, once they have shown merit and progression during their PhD.

Best of luck and best wishes to you.

Thread: Rewriting your PhD dissertation into a journal article - matters of self-plagiarism

posted
09-Jun-17, 10:50
edited about 4 minutes later
by Pjlu
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posted about 2 years ago
I would think you would be able to get more than one article out of your PhD, and yes you can publish from your dissertation. You would be reformatting and condensing parts of your dissertation to make this suitable for an article but not necessarily rewriting all of your content. Not many people are likely to read your PhD. However, the journal articles would have a broader audience.

Some people convert PhDs into books, and again they would change aspects of the PhD to make it suitable for a different audience and more readable-but the book would still be largely the PhD, in a more accessible and reader friendly format.

Thread: I want to fullfill my Ph.D dream. Where do I start??

posted
08-Jun-17, 22:09
edited about 3 minutes later
by Pjlu
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posted about 2 years ago
Hi Niturusaranya, I live in Australia, so again the process may not be the same as in India. However, if you do want to do a PhD, and have had a bit of a gap between your previous studies and the PhD, you need to start as the other posters have mentioned.

Think about the universities that you would like to attend (Eg, do they need to be in a particular city or region? etc)
Go on their websites and read the information posted about higher research degrees (PhD's and Masters of Research or MPHILs).
Look at the application process and opportunities for funding for a fee scholarship and/or a living stipend.
Then follow the processes the universities outline for applying for both a PhD and/or grants as well.

All universities (in my experience, I am currently at my third university for the PhD), have very detailed processes for how to apply.
Often if you have had a substantial gap between previous studies and starting a PhD, they will often require evidence that you are suitable. This evidence may include a reference from a previous lecturer or supervisor (honours or Masters).
Usually, they wish you to have a stronger idea of what you would like to research. Thus, not only an area (such as commerce or education) but a specific topic, issue or process within that area. You usually have to develop this further for your research proposal.

It is a good idea once you do have your information and understanding of the process sorted, to apply for more than one university, scholarship and PhD. In applying, you have to follow the process outlined by that university and usually there will be advisors who will discuss the process with you and outline what you have to do.

The whole process of locating, applying for and being placed on a PhD does take some time and quite a bit of work before you even get to hear whether you have an offer from a university. So it can be a while between deciding to go for a PhD, and actually commencing one.

You may also find that you may be offered a Phd with different levels of funding. Some are entirely self funded, some offer fee scholarships but no living stipend. Some offer fee free and a living stipend (very basic) and some very prestigious PhD scholarships exist which are quite rare, very hard to achieve, and these are generous scholarships that are offered to special topics in areas that the university or state or region which to support.

Doing a PhD can be a great experience, and a wonderful life achievement, as well as leading to an academic career if you are prepared to go further and are both lucky and talented. It is a major step though and there are many things to think about before and while you are applying.

Best wishes

P

Thread: No reply from PhD supervisor after interview?

posted
08-Jun-17, 08:56
by Pjlu
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posted about 2 years ago
I also think you need to contact the supervisor again. Given you have already met personally and spoken with the supervisor, do you think phoning him might be appropriate, as sometimes conversation can be clearer than emails going back and forth (or being overlooked by a busy academic).

It may or may not be the news you want to hear but at least you will know where you stand and what options you still might have-if not at this university, perhaps at another?

Thread: Can I copy parts of my master thesis directly into my PhD? How to reference copied text?

posted
08-Jun-17, 08:42
by Pjlu
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posted about 2 years ago
My thoughts would be that you would need to summarise the content of your three pages and condense them, avoiding any lengthy direct quotations and then cite yourself and the other authors in the usual manner-an intertextual reference if using APA or Harvard, or footnote or endnote if using a different citation system.

While your PhD is a continuation of work begun in your Master's thesis, it is a completely new work in itself and you would treat the Masters thesis just as you would any other article or reference that you would be using.

Thread: Supervisor ignoring me

posted
05-Jun-17, 21:59
edited a moment later
by Pjlu
Avatar for Pjlu
posted about 2 years ago
Hi V, wow-what a difficult experience. You mentioned that when you emailed the administrative staff, they forwarded the emails through to the tutor, who just ignored them.

Can you try emailing the admin staff again, but frame your response as a complaint, and request a response or pathway for further action, if they contact the tutor and nothing happens. I'd actually make the email really brief, and attach the information as a formal letter/document attachment and email it to the admin staff and your tutor. Mention that you are also posting a copy of the letter to all recipients (and do this-there must be a mail service or PO Box whereby you can send paper information).

In this letter, really outline your case and what has happened so far, so that these busy and distracted people (one of whom is the tutor) actually understand how their lack of communication is impacting you and your dissertation.

Be polite but assertive and spell out exactly what has happened-what your concerns are now-and a request for a response that commits to allowing you to submit in August. It is not as easy to ignore a letter (especially one with a trail of documentation) as it is to ignore or overlook an email.

Best luck with this...or any other response you may choose to try.

Thread: Upcoming viva and lost confidence in my thesis

posted
04-Jun-17, 07:38
by Pjlu
Avatar for Pjlu
posted about 2 years ago
Good luck Zutterfly, I am sure you will do well. You sound very prepared and organised. Wishing you all the best and hope the anxiety doesn't get you down too much beforehand.

Thread: Thrown Under the Bus By My Academic Supervisors

posted
02-Jun-17, 22:23
edited about 1 hour later
by Pjlu
Avatar for Pjlu
posted about 2 years ago
Hi PHDiva, did you have a plan B during your candidature as well as the academia plan? Many people with PhD's don't go on to become academics at Colleges and Universities, but they do use their knowledge, ability to research, present and write in their professional careers.

As a clinician, you had few opportunities to research. Now with your qualification, are there areas of professional practice that interest you, which you could research, even as you continue work as a clinician (perhaps in a part time capacity). Professional conferences often want practitioner presentations and publications and professional journals likewise.

You do not need your supervisors permission to go ahead and carve out a niche for yourself as a practitioner researcher nor to publish. You now are licenced to go ahead and do this yourself. Creating a blog or website or applying to sit on the boards or act in some capacity in professional associations of your field might also be of interest.

Best wishes P

Thread: Attend Graduation?

posted
31-May-17, 22:14
edited about 9 seconds later
by Pjlu
Avatar for Pjlu
posted about 2 years ago
You have completed a great milestone in your life and deserve to acknowledge and celebrate this in the way you think and feel best.
Don't let your department put you off, if you normally would have anticipated attending, but understand if you would prefer a different form of celebration.

I'll fly out again to attend mine this time round. I attended my undergrad but have graduated in absentia with my postgraduate qualifications up until now. It will be a bit of a trip but I've made the decision to do it this time (if and when that is-hoping it is late this year if all goes well).

Thread: Interview task on 'strategies to boost recruitment'. Any tips

posted
27-May-17, 23:15
edited about 9 seconds later
by Pjlu
Avatar for Pjlu
posted about 2 years ago
Congratulations!!! Well done and wishing you all the best at this exciting time!

Thread: Graduation: Who to please? Family or myself?

posted
26-May-17, 05:44
edited a moment later
by Pjlu
Avatar for Pjlu
posted about 2 years ago
Quote From Pjlu:
Wishing you a lovely celebration, with your supervisor and friends/fellow graduates.


Hi Louise, I just wanted to clarify that statement I made above. It assumes you are going to make a specific choice. I wish you a wonderful celebration whatever you decide to do. Congratulations on your PhD.

Thread: Graduation: Who to please? Family or myself?

posted
25-May-17, 23:31
by Pjlu
Avatar for Pjlu
posted about 2 years ago
I would do something similar to Tudor Queen's suggestion.

Your supervisors took you through this journey, were there for you and are part of your success. Your father's previous behaviour suggests that even if you did change to suit his work needs, he still might not be present on the day in the way you would hope.

This is your day and your success and you deserve to enjoy it. Wishing you a lovely celebration, with your supervisor and friends/fellow graduates. Perhaps you can organise to catch up afterwards for a meal or drinks with your parents to celebrate at a time that suits your father (it might be on a different day) and perhaps someone can take some photos or film your bit on stage and this can be sent to your father as well.
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