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Pjlu
Tuesday, 22 December 2009 at 8:10pm
Monday, 29 January 2018 at 7:37pm
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Thread: Corrected Thesis Submitted (Major Corrections)

posted
07-Mar-18, 20:46
edited about 20 seconds later
by Pjlu
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posted about 1 year ago
Hi there CP, I don't think they will just turn around and say 'fail' for some typos. My corrections experience is a little different. We don't have a viva but we do have presentations before submission for examination, then the thesis is examined and the reports are sent back to your internal committee 'panel chair', who pass the results on to your supervisors and the admin staff. My result was a pass with no corrections and a pass with something between minor and major corrections. No one would actually write down or say what it was, even when I pressed them.

Anyway the corrections required from the second examiner included some typos regarding commas on a specific type of APA reference, using a semi colon consistently for the word 'socio-economic', and a couple of other typos. The major bits were I did not include a couple of references that my examiner would have regarded as his and another's seminal work. (I didn't choose my examiner but I am pretty sure I now know who it is and I have included the seminal work). I did include work from my examiner, but not these specific references as my thesis had a different sort of focus. This person also wanted me to expand on some aspects of my lit review (a couple of paragraphs in specific sections). There were some suggestions or requests also that were clearly not relevant, and on my table I outlined why I would not be making these. I was given 6 months as a part time student, being told that it would be 3 months if I were full time, and it really took me probably around a fortnight to complete and return to my internal panel chair. So I am currently waiting to hear from the Grad Research people as to whether it is all good. So a part of me wonders whether everything is okay and another part of me is relatively relaxed about waiting for the panel chair's response.

I do think the process is hard-all of it. I think the worst parts for me were data collection and having to rework so many types of data collection, given participant disasters, but actually all of it has been hard. I am now past the age where I want an academic career and I have a successful career in Education, which is very fulfilling (and equally stressful, including the management of students, staff and parents who may be struggling or challenging to work with). However, I think the process has made me a stronger person and one less likely to agree or accept other's unsubstantiated opinions. It is hard though. Many best wishes for the rest of this process.

Thread: Author names on poster/paper

posted
02-Mar-18, 19:30
edited about 2 minutes later
by Pjlu
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posted about 1 year ago
Quote From TreeofLife:
I would certainly acknowledge them either way, whether talks, posters or papers, but that may not be enough.

The difficulty is about whether they have made a meaningful contribution I think. The project is very short so I have had to give a lot of direction otherwise they wouldn't get any results, so in this way it's a bit like being a technician. On the other hand, if the project was longer I know they would be much more independent and without their technical abilities they wouldn't have got the results in the first place, regardless of my input.

Long term this would be just be a very small contribution to the overall project, so is it ok to put their name on a poster, but then don't make them as an author on the final paper? I guess I feel there needs to be some sort of substantial intellectual contribution to warrant authorship.


Hi ToL, what is the usual protocol at your institution? What do your academic colleagues usually do? Did you pay this person for their work? These factors might help influence your decision.

My preferences, like Chickpea and pm133, would be to include the Masters student as a second author. Chances are I would probably also include them as a second author on papers that result from this specific research based on what I have observed in my own faculty and university.

Tudor, I really liked and understand your comment about using feelings to help work out what to do but while, like you I would be tempted to do this, I have learned from experience to be cautious about using these as a guide for practice, as they can be very personal interpretations at times and not always aligned to the institution's protocols or conventions.

Thread: Passed my PhD viva exam with only minor correction

posted
01-Mar-18, 06:20
by Pjlu
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posted about 1 year ago
Fantastic result for you AC, congratulations and well done! :)

Thread: Submitting corrections

posted
26-Feb-18, 20:42
edited about 28 seconds later
by Pjlu
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posted about 1 year ago
Hi Jamie, hope your corrections are okay-just about there-or there.

I've just submitted mine to panel chair (used a table as discussed earlier). Now just for the wait to see whether these are all good. I've decided that once the whole thing is accepted (fingers crossed this is soon), then I will probably leave the forum.

Job is getting very busy and once thesis is completely done and dusted, my postgraduate career will be at an end, (although not my professional career and I plan to continue to write in this capacity rather than as an academic).

Will post a final post on the hall of fame once I do have the final okay that corrected thesis is all good from my panel chair, and I am definitely on route to that grad ceremony.

Best wishes in the meantime Jamie, , hope you don't mind me posting this on your thread-just didn't want to start another one. Thank you for the encouragement and best wishes for your corrections and to everyone else.

Thread: Just submitted my thesis,can i publish part of it? any advise on how to do it

posted
26-Feb-18, 19:56
edited about 11 minutes later
by Pjlu
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posted about 1 year ago
All bots aside, to the original OP, I'm just a little curious. Do you mean publishing outside of the journal articles and conference presentations, that you would normally write during your PhD (or alternatively articles on your PhD that you write and submit at the end of completing your thesis)?

My understanding is that most PhD's are more commonly published nowadays as journal articles and conference proceedings.

With some PhD's in specific areas, such as history or literature studies, for example, they may be published, as books after the PhD is completed, once substantially revised and packaged into a publishable format. It would depend on the nature of your PhD and how interesting your subject matter was to a potential mainstream audience or academic publisher.

Thread: Poster Abstract

posted
26-Feb-18, 19:48
edited about 26 seconds later
by Pjlu
Avatar for Pjlu
posted about 1 year ago
Yes, this was part of one of a series of mandatory milestones for completing a PhD at my university. We all had to defend a poster at a conference as a component of our confirmation of candidature process around the 1 year mark. For many of us, the poster was based on our proposal, lit review, methodologies and pilot data. Good luck with it Dunham. I found this process useful for getting feedback and for consolidating some of my ideas.

Thread: PhD thesis minor corrections

posted
15-Feb-18, 20:17
edited about 47 seconds later
by Pjlu
Avatar for Pjlu
posted about 1 year ago
Quote From pm133:
Minor changes means the external doesnt need to see or approve your changes.
Simply argue away the things you wont be changing.
I didnt change every single comment either. I suspect most of us will do the same thing.


Just clarifying something from my comment that might be unclear. When I mention Panel Chair, I don't mean an external, I mean the internal person/academic who checks through your thesis and corrections for the admin personnel before they process your thesis-finalise awards and things. That person is called the Panel Chair or Committee Chair at my university. However, I know that other universities may not use this terminology, and/or have a slightly different version of the processes or committees and have often subtly different versions of what constitutes the different levels of corrections.

And just confirming again what PM133 has said. You don't have to make all of the corrections provided you can argue why. There were some corrections suggested by one of my examiners, for example, that really don't apply in my study and I have stated why I won't make these on my table. My supervisors told me that this was common practice and agreed with me completely on the points. (I am just finalising my corrections and table this weekend. My corrected thesis does not need to be checked by externals).

Thread: PhD thesis minor corrections

posted
15-Feb-18, 10:30
edited about 2 minutes later
by Pjlu
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posted about 1 year ago
Hi there, congratulations! Great result. You do not need to do all of the corrections listed provided you provide a good reason and argue your case.

With your university, does a minor corrections result require you to show your corrections to your panel chair (or equivalent). If so, you would generally make a table that lists the corrections, lists where you have made corrections, and then indicates the page or section and you would then provide them with this table and the corrections made.

You should have received a written email or letter that outlines what you have to do along with your results from your department admin personnel.

If you are making most of the corrections and have a good argument as to why you can't make one, then this should be okay.

However, what do your supervisors say? Are you expected to meet with them to decide which corrections you will make and which you will argue? (When I say argue-I don't mean write an essay on it, I mean make a short but relevant point on the table under that item that refutes the need for that correction, and explains very briefly why it does not apply to your study.)

Thread: Dropping out of my PhD and reapplying elsewhere

posted
05-Feb-18, 20:23
edited about 22 seconds later
by Pjlu
Avatar for Pjlu
posted about 1 year ago
Hi there EL92, I agree with ToL's response in general, and specifically with regard to your prospects for a successful new application given you have currently not passed probation to extend your MPhil into a PhD.

Instead, is it possible to complete your MPhil project with your current university, and then apply for a PhD that explores one of your outliers, or recommendations. My experience with social sciences/education theses, is that they inevitably point out further extensions or areas for study, which are closely related to your primary topic. Perhaps after completing your current study, you might be better placed to apply for that PhD.

The other option might be to look at what the benchmarks are for passing probation and carefully addressing these. Is funding going to be an issue do you think? Perhaps you have funding for your current degree though and this impacts on your choices?

How is your relationship with your current supervisors? Are they helpful and what advice are they giving? Do you think that the advice they are giving might help with the probation issues?

Best wishes-it is a tough process.

Thread: Applying for a new PhD

posted
04-Feb-18, 19:42
edited about 9 seconds later
by Pjlu
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posted about 1 year ago
Best wishes for a really positive interview Cat123.

Thread: checking the citations and references

posted
30-Jan-18, 20:16
edited about 31 minutes later
by Pjlu
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posted about 1 year ago
Hi Johannes, I think when you are going through your thesis and checking everything you do go through your citations and check that they match up to a reference in your references section correctly, and if you can't remember the reference once you have seen the title, then you go back and check the abstract or article, or your notes, to ensure that citation is correct.

There will be many that you know inside and out, and there will be others that you are less sure of, so it doesn't necessarily take as long as you think. As you say, 2-3 days set aside for this is reasonable.

I did this and no citations/references were queried regarding content or relevance but I noted that my examiners were very aware of the references and picked up any anomalies.

(In my case this amounted to a small number of references, where I had included a terminating comma with a book chapter reference. In the case of book chapters there are no terminating commas but with journal articles there are and in my final checks with a particular book which included several different chapters written by different authors, cited a few times for the different chapters, I had automatically included a comma on this set of book chapter references when there should be none and omitted a comma with a small number of journal references.

I didn't use referencing software as it caused problems with my document btw, so the mistake was my error-overlooked- I really couldn't see it because I was very tired by that time when I was doing final checks. Overlooked by my supervisors as well but picked up by a sharp eyed examiner. I had originally used referencing software but had to completely remove it when it became problematic so this became another issue...)

In addition, because the book chapter reference was copied and pasted in part when I repeated the reference in the refs section, I replicated my error inadvertently).

Thread: Random etiquette question

posted
29-Jan-18, 19:41
by Pjlu
Avatar for Pjlu
posted about 1 year ago
Maybe they have a very shy personality or similar-it may not be done intentionally to make you feel uncomfortable.The thing is not to worry too much about it all and just to do what you think is polite and then move on.

Thread: MY VIVA WAS TODAY !

posted
20-Jan-18, 06:50
by Pjlu
Avatar for Pjlu
posted about 1 year ago
Great result Kamali! :)

Thread: Should I see a counsellor or psychiatrist?

posted
19-Jan-18, 12:48
edited about 20 seconds later
by Pjlu
Avatar for Pjlu
posted about 1 year ago
Hi there, on the topic of speaking, similarly to yourself and ToL (post above), I often struggle to express complex and new ideas coherently on the spot. For professional presentations or even general defences, I write up and clarify, ensure my train of thought is logical and rehearse before formal presentations generally. I think many of us do and we learn to use different strategies to improve any public or professional communications.

When we are stressed, often we go into flight, fight or freeze responses-our body shuts down parts of our thinking brain and floods us with adrenalin so we can run away, fight our corner or sometimes we just freeze. It may well be that your stress symptoms bring on one of these responses, and as Tru pointed out, you may also be depressed (another condition which can impact negatively on how we think). These changes are not permanent but they can be frightening when one is undergoing them.

Tudor suggested, in addition to supporting your question about seeking counselling, seeking further clarification and support from your advisors-and this may be helpful not only in helping you source support, but perhaps letting your panel advisors know you need just a bit of moral support right now to help you through this.

Personally, I think if you can access counselling, then this would probably be very reassuring for you and an effective counsellor will help you work through the key issues and develop some supportive strategies to address them. You may not need much, just one or two sessions may be enough to get you through this. Many people use counselling for a range of life situations and find it very helpful. A psychiatrist is usually someone who you would see if you had a significant mental health condition and generally you need to be referred to one by a medical doctor or psychologist first, so counselling would most likely be more helpful and accessible through your university. Best wishes though, it is a hard process and being highly stressed is not your fault; it does seem to come with the territory.

Thread: Is this a sign I should leave academia?

posted
18-Jan-18, 12:02
edited about 22 seconds later
by Pjlu
Avatar for Pjlu
posted about 1 year ago
Quote From chickpea:
Congratulations Jambo!

I can relate to some of the things you've described. The reality is that some people do get handed a 'golden ticket' by their supervisors - I've seen people scrape through the PhD by the skin of their teeth and get handed a nice job right away - working alongside their supervisors. Academia's not any kind of straightforward meritocracy and the issues with it are well-documented. There are some things you can do to improve your chances - getting published and so on - and some things that are out of your control. With that in mind, I think you need to weigh up the different options and decide what to go for and how long to keep going for it. At the moment, I've not stopped applying for academic posts - but I only go for them if I genuinely think my skills and interests are a good fit for the post - and I'm looking at other avenues too.

What I will say is I don't think you have any reason to see your current position as a personal failure. You've achieved a PhD, with all the useful skills and expertise that go along with that. Don't let the problems of academia make you feel like you're on any kind of scrap heap - there are plenty of excellent people with the same struggles.


Great post-totally agree, and many, many congratulations Dr Jambo! Well done on achieving your PhD-a wonderful life achievement.
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