Overview of pm133

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pm133
Friday, 8 January 2016 at 12:02am
Thursday, 6 December 2018 at 5:16am
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page 1 of 59 recent posts

Thread: Messed up masters big time - options?

posted
30-Oct-18, 16:24
edited about 27 seconds later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 2 months ago
I must admit, that is the first time I have ever heard anyone attempt to describe multiple instances of entire chunks of plagiarism within the same submitted piece of work as "poor academic practice".

Plagiarism is generally described within student guideline documents, quite rightly, as cheating unless there is some very compelling reason for it and depression should never be used as a mitigating factor for cheating.

Cheating is fraudulent behaviour. Hence my use of the word "fraud".

I am genuinely surprised that your first thought is to look to defend the OP rather than their fellow students who didn't cheat. Is there a reason for that?

Thread: Messed up masters big time - options?

posted
30-Oct-18, 14:21
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 2 months ago
rewt,

I have a lot of respect for you that you can still find it within you to trust someone who has admitted academic fraud and is trying to link that act to their depression through the appeal channels. For me, that's a red line.

As for ruining their whole career? I dont think that will end up happening. The uni will probably buckle for reasons which are nothing to do with protecting the credibility of academia. As for future employers, trust is a major thing. Break it and you could well be in trouble. These are the consequences of any form of fraud. Would you want to get on a plane where this person had been in sole charge of maintenance? Would you want this person in charge of your drug prescription? Would you place them in charge of your personal finances or accounts? These are questions all employers will reasonably ask themselves.

You talk about giving people second chances but the cold hard reality is that life is brutal. Nobody deserves anything and you will be competing for jobs with people like the original poster. Would you feel OK if someone like that cost you a job you wanted? If so, you are a much stronger person than I am and fair play to you. They wont spend a single second thinking about you though.

Thread: Messed up masters big time - options?

posted
30-Oct-18, 14:10
edited about 27 seconds later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 2 months ago
Quote From LS932:
Quote From pm133:
If you have deliberately plagiarised another person's work then I think a score of 0 is perfectly fair. To give you anything higher than that would be grossly unfair to other students who have not cheated and would send out a terrible message. Personally, if I was a member of academic staff I would press to have any student found guilty of c.


I agree with you that I should be punished but I feel that my other work demonstrates that this is a blip. I have been in contact with the student union who say I should appeal. I have listed all the issues I have been facing this year and they think I have a case.

I am a bit offended that you think I am 'playing the depression card' as this is a serious issue for me and has impacted my life significantly. I do hope you never have to suffer from mental illness.


You were the one who brought your depression into a discussion about appealing And now you are attempting to play the victim card.

I know about depression very well thank you. It's not a mitigating factor in what is a case of academic fraud. When you attempt to make that link you do a serious disservice to the credibility of others suffering from it.

Thread: Disagreement with supervisor about a journal paper

posted
30-Oct-18, 13:54
edited about 44 seconds later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 2 months ago
I take your side on this but you can solve two problems with one stone here by thinking strategically.
She probably knows you won't get published straight away. No way will that happen.
By the time you have submitted the first draft and had it rejected you will be 6 months down the line and in a position to add your new findings during your revisions. The revision cycle will probably be a few weeks. That way you get your way without pissing her off and your turnaround time to publish ends up being weeks rather than months. If you do it your way the clock of 6 months doesnt start until you finish all of your extra work.

I would humour her on this and play the longer game.

Thread: Messed up masters big time - options?

posted
29-Oct-18, 12:47
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 2 months ago
If you have deliberately plagiarised another person's work then I think a score of 0 is perfectly fair. To give you anything higher than that would be grossly unfair to other students who have not cheated and would send out a terrible message. Personally, if I was a member of academic staff I would press to have any student found guilty of cheating removed from the course altogether and TBH I think you are extremely fortunate not to suffer this. Yes, we all make mistakes and yes we all deserve a second chance but you need to be punished first, learn from it, and show remorse.
Playing the depression card in an appeal when that clearly didn't affect your decision would be bad form but it's your choice.

You will need to take the punishment on the chin and find a way to rebuild your career. A transcript of your grades is going to quite rightly raise questions with future employers. After all, if you are prepared to cheat to get a grade, what will you be prepared to do if you reach industry and face a situation where your career is at risk?

It's not clear to me that the consequences of what you have done have truly sunk in yet. I think you sound more disappointed about being caught.

Thread: Job after MS

posted
26-Oct-18, 23:59
edited about 10 seconds later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 2 months ago
Take the job. Look for a better job whilst enjoying the privilege of being able to pay your bills.
There are plenty of graduates working in call centres and no end of people with PhDs working as lab technicians.
Think yourself fortunate to have found a technical job at all and stop complaining. You seem to have a bit of an attitude problem and an entitlement complex. You should drop that ASAP.

Thread: Choosing a new supervisor after leaving ex-abusive supervisor

posted
26-Oct-18, 06:07
edited about 18 seconds later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 2 months ago
Quote From monkiaa:
Quote From pm133:
The focus should NEVER be about publishing. It should be about the science. I would avoid any PI who spoke about publications being the point of all of this. If the science is good enough, papers will be a natural by product and you wont have to think about them. You can chuck obsessing about impact factors and the university the work is being done at in there as well. It's all froth and nonsense. The only thing that should matter is the quality of the science being done.



Dear pm133, I totally agree with you and I really wish to do a practical science I am passionate about, but the point is to be successful in academia you must have publications. Up to the moment, I don't know whether this junior supervisor is honest with me, he had been one of the co-authors of Nature while he was a Ph.D. student and it was interesting. However, I am afraid as he has no prior experience, and I don't know whether he is going to be a bully. As you may know, my ex-toxic supervisor didn't allow me to present my work at a top-tier conference workshop although being accepted. In the other side, I didn't have the technical facilities to conduct the experiment, and I don't know how I should know whether this junior PI has the facilities. This really boggles my mind, the start PI have dozen of citation and publications, while their student complain or want to leave, honestly I am confused and I would like to have a very good supervisor who is going a turning point in my academic life, so it is a very crucial selection which restricted by many factors.


I am not disagreeing that publications are important. I am saying you should not be focussing on them.

Thread: Feeling confused, lost and very inadequate at the start of my PhD - is that normal?

posted
25-Oct-18, 05:54
edited about 2 minutes later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 2 months ago
mandy, I am afraid your initial expectations are unrealistic. If you are able to hit the ground running within a week or two then you can't be doing anything worthwhile.
Ypu should expect to take around 6 months to a year to get your feet on solid ground.
It took me 4 months from my start date but I spent my summer holidays reading in advance of starting to that would take me to around 7 or 8 months.
I have never met anyone who has managed it in weeks.

Stop worrying about your colleagues. They SHOULD know much more than you at this stage because they are further along the path than you are.

Thread: Leaving MSc with PGDip

posted
25-Oct-18, 05:50
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 2 months ago
If you are having suicidal thoughts you need to see a doctor today. Nothing else comes close to this in terms of importance.

Thread: Advice needed re: past academic experience

posted
25-Oct-18, 05:47
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 2 months ago
You should contact potential supervisors, explain what you have just posted here, ask for an informal chat and ask them outright whether you have what they are looking for.
Mature students are always treated differently to younger people. You might well find that this is easier than you think.

Thread: Leave of Absence advice

posted
25-Oct-18, 05:42
edited about 6 seconds later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 2 months ago
I don't understand your point about a "sense of duty".
Your only duty is to make decisions in your life which benefit you.
As rewt says, it is not appropriate to be making decisions based on what other people think.
Especially when you are in ill health.
You are trying to solve all of your problems at once when you need to be making decisions one at a time.
Your first and only goal is to decide in your head whether to end the PhD or not.
You dont need to resign but you do need to make that simple decision.
Until you resolve this, it's pointless to think about applying for jobs or anything else.
One decision at a time.

Thread: Choosing a new supervisor after leaving ex-abusive supervisor

posted
25-Oct-18, 05:33
edited about 1 minute later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 2 months ago
The focus should NEVER be about publishing. It should be about the science. I would avoid any PI who spoke about publications being the point of all of this. If the science is good enough, papers will be a natural by product and you wont have to think about them. You can chuck obsessing about impact factors and the university the work is being done at in there as well. It's all froth and nonsense. The only thing that should matter is the quality of the science being done.

Thread: Leave of Absence advice

posted
23-Oct-18, 12:57
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 2 months ago
The word "appropriate" doesn't apply here. You are ill. This is not about holidays. This is about your health. If you had broken your leg, you probably wouldn't be asking about this.

The advice I gave you on the last thread still stands and you have not yet said whether you basically want to do the PhD or not. That then causes me some confusion because in your second point you talk about applying for jobs.

It is beginning to sound like you have decided to quit the PhD and that you are asking if it is OK to take a leave of absence and job hunt whilst still being paid the stipend knowing you have no intention of going back to the PhD. Am I correct about this?

Thread: How do people end up disseminating results on radio, in newspapers, etc?

posted
23-Oct-18, 12:49
edited about 28 seconds later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 2 months ago
TQ, it might be worth checking if you NEED to go through the press office at all. You might have to because you could be construed as representing the university. If you don't, this buys you a lot of freedom and I would consider contacting the head offices of the outlets you are interested in and pitch your idea using a short precis and an offer to write a press release of x words for them.

Personally I would prefer the freedom approach but it's worth checking.

Thread: Writing a grant - how it works

posted
07-Oct-18, 01:54
edited about 4 seconds later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 2 months ago
It's a great question TQ and I would be interested to see what others have to say about this.
I have no experience of postdoccing or applying for funding but would the specific funding application process itself not provide details on all of this? I imagine they are all different.
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