Overview of pm133

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pm133
Friday, 8 January 2016 at 12:02am
Thursday, 6 December 2018 at 5:16am
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page 1 of 59 recent posts

Thread: How to cope with depression

posted
28-Aug-18, 14:31
edited about 10 seconds later
by pm133
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posted about 4 months ago
It is pretty clear that this new supervisor is not going to give you what you want. I wouldn't tolerate being shouted at and would seek a new supervisor immediately.

Thread: PhD dropout - finding jobs :(

posted
28-Aug-18, 14:30
edited about 6 seconds later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 months ago
iwan, you have only had 4 interviews. The cold, hard truth is that you haven't had enough interviews yet to be overly worrying about why you are being rejected. At the start of your career it is a numbers game. You are just going to have to power through this I'm afraid. My hit rate at your stage was about 7 interviews before being offered 1 of them so I'm in agreement with TQ. A friend of mine has just gone through 10 interviews before being offered 2.

Your post here also clears up the questions I had based on your other thread. You have had just one difficult set of questions about your PhD withdrawal and those sort of questions are not systemic in industry. From your last thread it sounded like this was something you were facing everywhere. On that front then it is good news.

As TQ say, you are going to need patience and resilience. There is no sugar coating it.

Thread: Non-critical supervisors

posted
28-Aug-18, 14:16
edited about 3 minutes later
by pm133
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posted about 4 months ago
rewt, you don't need to be impolite to ask for things directly.
If your supervisors don't like to rock the boat you need to find a way of making your questions as specific as possible.
For example, if you ask them how you are doing you give them the chance to say "oh fine". If you ask them what 3 bits of advice they could give you to improve you drastically cut their chances of fobbing you off.
As far as the endless data collection is concerned I would ask them directly what data is missing, how this new data would fill that hole and whether there were any other specific concerns they had before publishing. The point here is to get them to acknowledge that publishing is definitely going to happen sometime this year and then getting them to agree a set of actions which, once complete, remove their final barriers to getting your draft sent in to publishers.

All of these actions on your part give an air of assertiveness on your part. It clearly says that you are in control of the process whilst seeking their input as a courtesy. It gains their respect and is more likely to boost their confidence in you that you actually have an idea what you are talking about. They maybe just don't get that confidence from you just yet but it's easily fixed if that is the case.

Thread: Revise and resubmit-passed viva exam second time round!

posted
27-Aug-18, 17:24
edited about 1 minute later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 months ago
Quote From Drhannahb:
PM133 we are on the same page with this. Ive always been a little naive about the world (overprotected daddys girl from birth!) but I grew up in quite a tough neighbourhood with a lot of brothers and so didnt realise that women were so toxic until I started working in my 20s and doing the PhD. I expected that in such a tough world run by men, women had each others backs. But everything you just pointed out is something we definitely dont discuss enough. Women try to project the idea of sisterhood but there isnt one, and never has been. Im more aware now in light of my experiences but its good that youve opened up this narrative as it needs much more acknowledgment.


Unfortunately people are terrified of talking about stuff like this because when they do, someone will jump down their throats as you saw above,
My advice to my daughters was to avoid expecting sexism everywhere because eventually you start thinking you are seeing it everywhere; don't be a victim (feminism has a lot to answer for here and both my daughters have grown up to loathe everything it stands for); avoid the chip on the shoulder thing because once that happens, you are dead in the water; Don't expect fairness or equality because neither exist; Beware any man who claims to be more feminist than feminists - they could be simply using it as a predatory move; and avoid an obsession with makeup, hair dye, high heels, tight dresses etc. If you want to be taken seriously, act seriously by cutting out all that self indulgent crap because if you are spending an hour or more each day on this sort of thing, it screams out loud that you value your looks and appearance and need to be noticed above all else. You are just not going to be respected. A few men do this sort of thing as well and I have the same advice for them.

Thread: Open Science / "negative results" / a vision of the future...

posted
25-Aug-18, 01:36
edited about 14 seconds later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 months ago
Paywall journals will never do this.
What could be done however is for funding bodies to request a full report to be made of all attempted work including negative results which could then go on a free website for others to access.
Funders should demand to know how all of their money was spent. Not just the edited highlights.

Thread: PhD dropout resume?

posted
25-Aug-18, 01:33
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 months ago
Quote From Becky1210:
Quote From kikothedog:
Just don't go into lots of detail about any research you carried out. I'm not saying dumb down but I do know of employers binning CV with higher degrees on them for fear they clearly won't stay.


That is exactly what I was concerning, not only I will not be considered at all because of the graduate studies, but I think it's bad if other co-workers knew my background that I might get challenge and bullied. Thanks for the input.


I am not sure I understand you here. Why do you think you would be bullied?

Thread: Second masters in related field

posted
25-Aug-18, 01:31
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 months ago
If ypu already have a Masters in this field, why would you get another one?
If your reason is to get a "top" university on your CV, this would absolutely crazy.
If I was hiring you and that was your reason, your interview would be over pretty quickly because it would tell me that your main focus was not on your research but on meaningless sideshow trivialities.

Thread: Conference abstract - different results/changes

posted
25-Aug-18, 01:26
edited about 4 seconds later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 months ago
Happened to me.
I stood up, introduced my self and explained that recent results meant they would now be getting a more up to date talk.

Thread: Mphil scenario

posted
22-Aug-18, 23:50
edited about 2 minutes later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 months ago
I think you are coming to the right decision here.
There are vast swathes of people who have or will obtain their PhD who dont have a fraction of the ability, personal awareness, willingness to show personal integrity or willingness to put themselves through critical evaluation in the manner in which you have done. You deserve a lot of respect for that. Do you really want to voluntarily allow those people to outrank you after all this effort?
I wont lie, it is nice to sit back during difficult times and say "I am a Doctor". Only about 3000 of us a year in the UK get to do that. Come and join us. You have worked your socks off and more importantly, you have earned it.

Oh great! I just re-read this with stirring classical music in the background. Now I am tearing up a little. I am a man. This CANNOT be happening.....just....sorry....where are all the damn hankies?....EXCELLENT, I have now woken both my wife and the dog.....

Thread: PhD dropout resume?

posted
22-Aug-18, 23:39
edited about 21 seconds later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 months ago
Quote From Becky1210:
Hi everyone thanks for reading this. As PhD quitter, I am looking for a real job but at the same time I need a part-time to pay bills. Do I have to write that I am a PhD dropout when applying for part-time position? I am planning to work as cashier at locate store or in a cafe or some kind and I am afraid people will not understand what I did as a phD student and that they might not hire me for this reason. But I don't want to lie either... what is your experience?


Your CV is a personal marketing document. Put whatever you like in it as long as it is true. Omit whatever you want as well but employers will ask what you did during that period

Thread: PhD Writing up Tips ?

posted
22-Aug-18, 02:11
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 months ago
Quote From Nead:
Hi All,
Just wondering if anyone has any helpful tips on writing up?
I've been officially out of the lab and writing since June. I've two papers published (Two chapter completed) but now I'm struggling. Does anyone have any tips on how to stay focused and motivated? How do you write that dreaded chapter (One chapter I’ve started on five different occasions but can't get passed the methods)?
I am writing my thesis in paper format, it going to have 6 working chapters, alongside introduction and discussion. Two chapters are done, two are submitted to my main supervisor awaiting feedback, but the last two I just can't be bothered with.

Any tips, tricks or ideas to stay motivated would be greatly appreciated!

Nead


I am not sure there are any really good tricks or tips that anyone can offer to be honest. Some people believe things like picturing yourself with the certificate or roaring "I am a tiger grrrr" into a mirror will help but I think that causes people to panic and lose hope more often that not and I reckon in all cases they become ineffective eventually anyway because they deal with symptoms and not the root causes of lack of motivation. That tiger one just scared my neighbours.

Motivation has to come from inside you. Once you have it you need to break the remaining tasks down into manageable chunks of work which you can tick off and that might stop the motivation leaving you but you need to be motivated yourself first.

This is a crevice we all have to span though so don't feel it's just you who is struggling.
Find someone to make you laugh and share some gallows humour.

Thread: Mphil scenario

posted
22-Aug-18, 02:03
edited about 19 seconds later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 months ago
I am actually quite surprised you are still unsure what to do here.
Have you had any advice from anyone who genuinely thinks downgrading is a good idea with all the considerable downsides listed on this thread?

Have you listed pros and cons for both decisions?

Thread: Am I screwed? :( A year in, still zero motivation, not happy with progression...

posted
22-Aug-18, 01:56
edited about 2 minutes later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 months ago
Cad,
You can probably resolve this quite quickly.
Meet with your supervisor and ask them to be brutally blunt about how they see your progress. By definition you are not best placed to judge. You supervisor is. Let their answer guide your next move.

Oh and NEVER compare yourself to other students. It is pointless and it's the road to madness. Take it from someone who learned this the hard way. You probably won't be competing with them for jobs.

If you have completely lost interest in everything it might be time to walk away with an Mphil and try elsewhere.

Thread: Dealing with "sexism" in the lab

posted
22-Aug-18, 01:44
edited about 8 minutes later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 months ago
I know life can be made very difficult for people but I can't agree that the response to that would be to accept you have no control at all over your situation. I have two daughters and if anyone made their lives difficult my instinct would drop everything and visit that person. However I believe it is my job to ensure my kids are educated about how unfair life is and to fight for personal control themselves regardless of the consequences. They need tto do it for themselves.

What I would be telling them is this:-
You can always get a new job. Always.
You can always get a new PhD position. Always.
Don't accept crap from people. Ever. It never ends well.

Learning to cope with difficulty in general and difficult people specifically is a core life skill.

I think it's fairly simple. If you don't learn these skills you will be shafted again and again. The earlier you learn to tackle these people and regain control over your future the better in my opinion. It doesn't help to soft soap people. Bad people aren't suddenly going to go away and people need to learn to protect themselves instead of relying on others to do it for them (police, courts etc). I think it is idealistic to think otherwise.

I don't think MyWorld has a choice. It's eat or be eaten. The next time her supervisor makes an innappropriate comment about her appearance she should not look at him, carry on her work in a nonchalent fashion and in a very assertive voice say "If my husband heard you saying that he would beat the shit out of you" and then ignore him. He would have to be a real dumb ass to then start punishing her. He may not be scared of her but he will be scared of what her husband might do!

Thread: Dealing with "sexism" in the lab

posted
21-Aug-18, 19:09
edited about 8 minutes later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 months ago
Yes, it's a blurry area and because of that, the OP has an obligation to be absolutely certain that sexual harassment is taking place before making any sort of formal complaint. A person's career is on the line here.

Men hit on women all the time even if the women is married or working for them. Although I personally wouldn't do either it's a long way from there to sexual harassment and I think we devalue the problem if we fail to distinguish between them. The examples you gove above are clearly examples of sexual harassment but I am not sure this is what MyWorld is actually having to deal with.
There are many examples of supervisors and subordinates hooking up so in my opinion, this is not the issue. Harassment for me requires the harasser to be in no doubt that what they are doing is unwanted. I am not sure whether that is the case or not with MyWorld. It's clear she is not happy but does HE know that? A strong verbal response is a cast iron guaranteed way of getting the message across. Non verbal clues really aren't enough. I don't think the point about being "powerless" to speak up is good enough for grown adults to be relying on. An accusation of sexual harassment will destroy this man's life so if he is making you uncomfortable you either need to tell him or leave.

Actually another bit of advice might be to ask HR to have a word and tell him he is making her uncomfortable without directly accusing him of harassment. Now she would have a log of that chat and an email trail. It would then be tough for him to punish her. She could also ask for all meetings to be attended by a 3rd party to ensure no foul play. I have seen that tactic used twice to good effect.
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