Overview of pm133

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pm133
Friday, 8 January 2016 at 12:02am
Friday, 11 October 2019 at 10:31am
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page 1 of 73 recent posts

Thread: Computational PhD in biology?

posted
17-May-16, 14:41
edited about 59 seconds later
by pm133
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posted about 3 years ago
Quote From KimWipes:
To my opinion (PhD- Computational Chemistry 2011) currently any degree on "computational x, y, z" has a shelf life of max 5-10 years awaiting for so-called quantum computers to become main stream, then PhD-people become irrelevant as machine learning on quantum computers means the work you do for your PhD in 3~6 years can be produced by the computer itself in the blink of an eye!... There was this article in BBC couple of months ago about which jobs will more likely be gone as a result of advancing computers and I think the irony was that the software related jobs were the ones that most likely be gone ....


If you have a PhD in Computational Chemistry then you will know that computers (whether quantum or not) will always need to be told which problem to solve and to have their results interpreted. In both cases that can only ever be done by a human being. The job of the Computational Chemist for example is to identify a problem in chemistry, make the calculation and then interpret the result in terms of the chemistry involved in the system. For most computational chemistry jobs the software is simply a tool used as a black box. Quantum computers won't change that. In fact it will make more problems solvable which currently are out of reach.

Scientists and engineers have been talking about replacing humans from the workplace since the beginnning of robotics and yet here we are with record employment and a massive increase in the types and complexities of work available. Jobs may change but plentiful, intelligent work will always be available. I believe there is absolutely zero chance of routinely available, affordable functioning quantum computers arriving within the next 5-10 years and absolutely zero chance of the type of AI required to remove jobs altogether being available any time within the next 40 or 50 years in my opinion.
Synthetic Chemistry jobs will go first and computers are a real threat to that.

Thread: anyone in a lab-based phd out there? no time to write!

posted
20-Mar-16, 14:22
by pm133
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posted about 3 years ago
Its a time management issue which is not limited to lab based work. I am doing a computational based PhD and I have the same issue. There is always another calculation to do. It is particularly tough if you are not getting results because you cant relax reading papers when you are worrying about having no results. The problem of having to write your thesis wont go away though so you need to learn to time manage.

Thread: How to write a thesis that disproves another student?

posted
24-Feb-16, 00:35
edited about 5 seconds later
by pm133
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posted about 3 years ago
Quote From BioMedPhD:
I have spent the previous 2 years of my 3 year phd program attempting to replicate the results of a previous student in the lab (who was recently awarded her phd for the work). After trying to reproduce her results using her method, using different methods and even going so far as to generate a new transgenic cell line, I CANNOT REPRODUCE any of her results.
Should I include these negative results in my thesis? Has anyone experienced a similar situation before?


The bigger concern is that at this stage of your PhD you seem to believe that not being able to reproduce someone's results means you have disproved their results. As explained above, you haven't disproved anything. If you publish that you HAVE you are going to have a major credibility issue in the viva.

Thread: Low 2.1, worth looking for PhD?

posted
24-Feb-16, 00:29
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 3 years ago
Quote From shimetal:
So I have very low 2.1 from decent university (Russell group). It's borderline 2.2. If it helps, I've got just over 70 from my 3rd year research project but by the end of the year I had some mitigating circumstances and I've essentially got just over 40 from 2 exams and failed to deliver my 3rd year literature review.

This happened in 2014. University decided not to graduate me in 2014 and instead offered me to retake some modules and redo literature review in 2015. I didn't take this offer as I felt I would do ever worse. So I graduated in 2015 with low 2.1 and a big 0 from 3rd year literature review.

Now I wonder if it's even possible for me to get into PhD, let alone get some funding.

EDIT: I forgot to mention I was studying biochemistry. I'm now working in banking (anti-money laundering) so I have no relevant work experience.



If you really want to do this the. you should certainly start talking to potential supervisors.
I would imagine you would find a position.
The bigger concern is the 2:1 regardless of which university you got it from. To be honest, in terms of your education, the university is largely irrelevant. The fact is that you have learned barely 60% of what you have been taught. That knowledge gap is going to be a problem and you will need to close it urgently or the PhD may end up being a nightmare. Spotting links in interpreting your data for example and generating ideas for example will be much more challenging for someone without a 1st class. It can be done though.

Thread: Do any of you have just one supervisor?

posted
24-Feb-16, 00:13
by pm133
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posted about 3 years ago
I have two supervisors but the second person has no knowledge of what I do. Having said that, I dont really have much dealings with my first supervisor either and have only meet up every few months to report progress. Exactly how I like it.

Thread: Who is really enjoying their PhD.

posted
24-Feb-16, 00:11
by pm133
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posted about 3 years ago
Overall I am enjoying the experience. Just entering final year. Having a steady stream of papers has certainly helped but it is stressful at times, hugely intense at all times and there are periods where I wonder what the hell I am doing. The worst part though, and the source of most stress, is not knowing for certain what I want to do afte graduation.

Thread: a question for people who english is 1st or 2nd language

posted
09-Jan-16, 11:56
edited about 43 seconds later
by pm133
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posted about 3 years ago
English is my first language and I have no problems when it comes to writing. Most native speakers however will still struggle to write academic text.
It must be a complete nightmare having to write in English when it is your second language.
I've noticed that one of the major giveaways that someone is not a native English speaker is their use of the words 'a' or 'the'. Learning the basic syntax of English is hard enough but learning how to use those two words can be baffling unless you've grown up with it. It's rare to find a native speaker who would struggle with them though.

Thread: Resubmission and unsupportive supervisor

posted
08-Jan-16, 00:50
edited about 12 seconds later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 3 years ago
Every phd student is different I suppose. My supervisor is very hands off but is there if I ever need him. Occassionally he wil get in touch if he hasnt heard from me for a while. I see him no more than once every 2 months or so. For me, this is perfect. I see this as my phd, my research and my responsibility entirely. At the end if this process next year I am expected to be an independent researcher and so I act like that on a daily basis. It has made the phd much much harder than it could have been but I gain from that in terms of independence and resilience although the latter has caused me no end of sleepless nights.
When I finish a piece of work, I write up for publication myself and I never expect my supervisor to do anything more than a cursory check because I assume it is my responsibility to get the paper correct and to face the reviewers on my own. I would not want to do this any other way. He always does read my papers and gives decent feedback but I don't expect it and I certainly don't depend on it. If I fail, I fail. In my opinion this is what a phd is all about. Come thesis submission time, I will send him a draft and ask for comments but again I don't expect him to read it in detail - this is my work not his.

I don't wish to be critical of anyone who wants to have a different way of working.We all work differently. This however is my experience and I am going to sorely miss the intensity of it when I finish up early next year.

Thread: Notice of Retraction

posted
08-Jan-16, 00:36
edited about 6 seconds later
by pm133
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posted about 3 years ago
This feels like a hidden question.
Do you have a retracted paper?
If so, some more details on the nature of the retraction would be helpful.

Thread: How long did it take you to write up and submit?

posted
08-Jan-16, 00:18
edited about 1 minute later
by pm133
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posted about 3 years ago
My approach is to write up the theoretical background chapter as I go. The other chapters will then be taken directly from published articles at the end and I don't expect that to take more than a month. It's likely I will take a month out with 3 months to go to complete the thesis. If I have any residual time left I can go back to my research. I work in Theoretical Chemistry so this approach may not work for everyone.

Thread: How do you keep up with the current research? Sciece related

posted
08-Jan-16, 00:14
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 3 years ago
As a science phd student, I generally don't attempt to keep up at all. There isn't time at this stage of my career. I like to work on an idea, performing the literature search at the start of the job. I then don't tend to look at the literature again until it's time to publish. I then start the whole process over again.

Thread: What is or is not intellectual property theft?

posted
08-Jan-16, 00:10
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 3 years ago
This is a terrible situation to be in and I hope you can resolve it. I know it is very common for students to be encouraged to talk about their work but I would never discuss anything in detail that I had not already published. At this stage, the consequences are potentially devastating if your ideas are stolen. It seems the currency of academia is ideas. From these ideas, funding flows and the whole process is cutthroat. This provides a breeding ground for the sort of ruthlessness you have witnessed. Academia SHOULD be collegiate but the process doesn't seem to allow for it. Good luck.
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