Overview of pm133

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pm133
Friday, 8 January 2016 at 12:02am
Thursday, 12 March 2020 at 3:23pm
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page 1 of 78 recent posts

Thread: Self-Funded PhDs. Good or Bad?

posted
16-Oct-16, 00:51
edited about 1 second later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 years ago
Quote From fallenonion:
Hi pd1598. Well, my point to the OP is that, personally, I think it depends on circumstance. A blanket view that no funding means don't do it, I think is too sweeping. I have heard of self funded candidates getting jobs, so it has to happen to someone. I was trying to help, sorry if it wasn't clear. I'm assuming that the OP has some form of income, as I,doubt they expected yo live on air for years.

I'm sorry also if you think I'm ranting. My point is, there are (or should be) different routes for everyone. Not everyone peaks at undergrad, and knows at the age of 21 or 22 that academia is what they want to do. Some people, like me, felt it wasn't an option, went off and did other things, then came back to it later. Once you've got a mortgage and stuff, it's difficult to get by on a bursary. But If you've worked, and saved and are prepared to make the sacrifices necessary, why shouldn't that be rewarded? It makes no sense to me.


I am on a fully funded phd in the UK and have a mortgage and three children to feed. My wife earns less than I do and we get by perfectly well. You would be well advised to rethink your attitude. Specifically it isnt helpful to rail against unfairness. The world has never operated on fair principles. It should. But it doesnt. Be careful you dont become consumed with anger about it.
My advice is that you should do whatever feels right. Academia recruits people based on rules probably nobody on here is privy to. Trying to second guess these people is the root of all madness. Industry hires phd graduates. if your skills are transferable, can figure out how to create a decent CV and you can hold a conversation in an interview you should have no problems. Good luck.

Thread: First year of PhD. Full time job and part time PhD student!! Please help. Writers block since June!!

posted
16-Oct-16, 00:27
edited about 1 minute later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 years ago
Quote From Maria212:
I am 27, part time PhD Student and in a full time job. My hours are a little crazy. According to the code of practice I need to invest 12 hours a week as the base minimum into my PhD. So far I have been doing two hours each day religiously after work from 6pm – 8pm and do 8 hours on a Saturday and 8 hours on a Sunday which totals to 26 hours a week part time on my PhD.
I tend to work better in short bursts as I don’t lose momentum. I am panicking because I haven’t done much since June and I am already 6 months into the PhD..!! My annual review is in April 2017 and I am just panicking because I don’t think I have made much progress! I am exhausted, tired, have pretty much no social life and working my guts out. I worry constantly that I am not working hard enough. Any advice?
What did you guys complete in the first 6 months of your PhD?? Please help!


I am not surprised you are having some difficulty. It sounds like you have burnt yourself out. If my arithmetic is correct you are putting in at least 65 to 70 hours per week. That is an absolutely insane number of hours to be working per week doing technically difficult work. It is absolutely impossible to be fully productive if you are doing those hours.

Thread: Anyone with two PhDs?

posted
06-Oct-16, 21:44
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 years ago
Quote From jojo:
i can understand the theology one, but why not do an MA? or a postdoc? i just never understand people who do two masters, two bscs etc. but soon i'll be joining the two masters club after my phd. probably take a masters in a completely different field.... for the fun of learning more about the field without the pressure of a thesis.


Doing two full degrees at Masters or Honours level is quite common. I have done it.
I made a career out of the first degree which lasted around 15 years and then I got bored and went back for a second stab at a new career which required a degree. I am as certain as I can be that this will not be my last degree.
It most certainly will be my last PhD though.

Thread: PhD at older age?

posted
06-Oct-16, 21:38
edited about 12 seconds later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 years ago
Quote From RKV:
Dear Friends,
For doing a PhD (Aero) in the US, I got positive response from a few universities. I am 32 now (Single). I am planning to get married in between PhD.

Is it possible to work a Full time PhD with part time job (in industry)?. I have 5 years R& D work experience. I think Its possible. For that, I have to convince my supervisor as well as the University.

As a single, there no financial difficulties (Univ. PhD stipend is more than sufficient), but once married, I have to earn money for survival along with spouse.

Any Advice and suggestions will be greatly respected.


Not sure why getting married would suddenly require you to earn more money unless your spouse is planning not to work at all.

Thread: Viva prep: how many hours!?

posted
05-Oct-16, 20:15
edited about 37 seconds later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 years ago
Quote From GrumpyMule:
Hello all,

I've read lots of very useful advice RE viva prep. In particular a lovely person on this forum recommended Murray's chapter in How to write a thesis and a first read of that has proved very reassuring.

I now have 4 weeks and 4 days until my viva. I haven't looked at the thesis since submission but feel the pressing need to start preparing.

My question is... how many hours do people spend/have people spent preparing for the viva? Murray's book talks about starting to prepare one month before but I also need to consider that I work 35 hours a week.

I am planning to begin spending an hour a day every day on viva prep and possibly a little more in the week before. I'm finding it really hard to know how much preparation to do (eg. how well should I know every paper cited and how much wider literature should I read). Some of these things are hard to measure in hours.

Any advice is much appreciated.

Thanks

GM


Personally I have been consciously preparing for my viva for the entire duration of my PhD. I have never been a believer in crash studying as an effective thing to do. I may well be prepared to change my opinion if I end up getting hosed when I finally sit it though.

Thread: PhD at older age?

posted
05-Oct-16, 20:13
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 years ago
Quote From Tudor_Queen:
I'm not sure what others think about this, but I can't really liken the supervisor-student relationship to a manager/boss-employee one. For me, it has been completely different. I'd say it is more like a marriage, or very longterm relationship (but no, more like a marriage - because your funding is involved, etc so no way do you want a divorce!). Your PhD is like the baby. If you're getting on, great. If not, then there is a very different kind of stress/feeling until you can work it out with them. You don't leave your PhD in the office (even if you technically do) - it's more than a job.

But it's something you navigate once you get to know them. It would be hard to know beforehand if there were going to be issues. If you're determined to do a PhD and enjoy the process, you'll make a way for it to work out if things do get tricky on the supervisor front.

My supervisors are also great!


I would agree that the supervisor/student thing bears no relation to a manager/worker situation. TBH I would be extremely concerned if anyone cnosidered their supervisor to be their boss because this is supposed to be the student's PhD not the supervisor's.

As for the age thing. It isnt even a consideration. There is no age barrier. 47 years old and currently writing up.

Thread: PhD at older age?

posted
05-Oct-16, 20:06
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 years ago
Quote From Mattfabb:
To be completely honest, I found that some older PhD students struggle a bit with the whole supervision thing. Being a PhD means that, to put it bluntly, you are in a subordinate position to your super. Some scholars I know who already published books and stuff, find it difficult to go back being supervised. Also: a friend of mine in his 50s is so stubborn that he ended up fighting with his supers and even with his examiners at the viva. He doesent seem to be handling it well at all...


This really has nothing to do with his age and everything to do with his attitude.

Thread: Lazy PhD advisor destroyed my experience of doing research and PhD

posted
02-Oct-16, 12:09
edited about 26 seconds later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 years ago
Also I am confused about your attitude here.
Lazy supervisor?

Thread: Lazy PhD advisor destroyed my experience of doing research and PhD

posted
02-Oct-16, 12:07
edited about 26 seconds later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 years ago
Too old to start a PhD at 31 ?????
Why on earth would you think that?

Thread: Playing 2nd Fiddle to the PhD

posted
02-Oct-16, 12:04
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 years ago
I would echo the advice above. You really need to be saying all this stuff to your partner.

Thread: Major submission decision needed today -supervisor blocking

posted
02-Oct-16, 12:02
edited about 8 seconds later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 years ago
Both your supervisors have told you that your writing is not good enough. Ignore that at your peril. You seem sure that the fact that you are using a new method is at the root of their concern but I get the impression from what you have said that it is the quality of your writing which is the issue. It might be worth stepping back here and making absolutely certain you inderstand why neither wants you to submit right now.

Thread: Publish or Perish

posted
01-Jul-16, 10:57
edited about 5 seconds later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 years ago
Bringing this back on topic and removing the sexism, the question should be how do you balance career and parenthood?
This is exceptionally difficult and in my experience you have to sacrifice something.
You can still have a good career and be a good parent but if your priority is to leave work when the phone rings to deal with your child it is inevitable that other work colleagues who are more dedicated to their work will gain the promotions and pay rises.
Equally if you commit to work you will miss out on the early years of your childs life.
Having tried both of these approaches I am well aware that neither extreme works.
It's a terrible situation to be in.
The solution? I think having a society which provides equal rights to men and women regarding maternity/paternity would be a good start. Also, access to cheaper childcare would help but in my opinion the single biggest thing we could do is to legislate to force all employers with more than 10 members of staff to provide free wrap around childcare on-site for all parents from 8am to 6pm. This would revolutionise the workplace and be the start of true equality.

Thread: Publish or Perish

posted
01-Jul-16, 10:49
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 years ago
Quote From TreeofLife:
It's not always that easy Dunham. Sometimes other factors have to be considered when making choices. For example, could I, as a single woman, take a job hundreds of miles away from home and raise a child? Highly unlikely isn't it? How would I afford child care full time on a postdoc salary? How can I breast feed adequately if I'm supposed to be working full time? It's not as easy to say just find a man who is happy to take over child care responsibilities to enable a woman to focus on a career.


You could easily say exactly the same thing about a single man raising a child.

All I am trying to say is that this isn't about sexism. It's about the difficulty of raising a child and succeeding in your profession.
This is an issue that affects both men and women.
I may not be a woman, as you indicated above, but I am a parent of 3 children and I know exactly what it feels like to have to make choices between career and family.
Please don't assume that men have an easy job of this.

Thread: Publish or Perish

posted
01-Jul-16, 10:45
edited about 17 seconds later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 years ago
Quote From AbiFAU:
Quote From jojo:
Hi lovelies,
I’m back again. Can’t believe its been five years since completing my phd. You can all do it! Believe me! Superhard, but yes you can. I couldn’t have made it without being part of this forum. I have since joined academia and I am now at senior lecturer level.

Quote From jojo:
I have come back here to look for support from academics, especially female academics, mature students and those writing up. We can encourage one another by cheering each other on, holding each other accountable and sharing the wisdom we’ve gathered along the way. Lets do this!


Hi All,

Jojo started and ended this feed with a positive message, lets try and keep the comments on here positive and supportive please!

Thanks very much,
Abi


In what way is the following sentence from the original poster supportive or positive? ". It is easier for the guys to progress at work because they get a lot done for them – dinner, laundry, baby-sitting - all they have to do is focus."

Thread: Publish or Perish

posted
01-Jul-16, 10:44
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 years ago
Quote From chickpea:
It's a shame you've had such negative, aggressive responses here, jojo. I don't have the time or inclination to engage with these arguments yet again, except to say that it's clearly documented that there isn't a level playing field, and this is why we have initiatives like Athena Swan (which I understand, from talking to academics, isn't making much difference yet).


Of course Athena Swan isn't making much difference.
That's because what the original poster is describing isn't sexism in the workplace. If it is sexism at all it's sexism in the home.
Athena Swan answers the wrong question and really the lack of a difference should be telling people that.
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