Overview of pm133

Overview

Avatar placeholder
pm133
Friday, 8 January 2016 at 12:02am
Thursday, 6 December 2018 at 5:16am
881
Login to send a private message to pm133
page 1 of 59 recent posts

Thread: How much ownership can I take on paper / analyses etc

posted
12-Aug-18, 01:22
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 months ago
Yes I think that is the best approach. When everyone has written their part it will look like a dogs breakfast at first. Once a single person then takes on the for al editing process it will start to take shape,

Thread: Mphil scenario

posted
12-Aug-18, 01:19
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 months ago
TQ, are you talking about yourself???
Surely not?

Thread: How much ownership can I take on paper / analyses etc

posted
11-Aug-18, 01:23
edited about 2 minutes later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 months ago
I have worked on papers with more than one contributor.
They were science papers so I don't know how different it is for you but here was my experience.
Each contributor was allocated a specific piece of work and it was down to each contributor to fully analyse their own data including the provision of tables or graphs unless the main author decided to use his own preferred graphing app.
The main author then ties it all together.

I would have found it very odd to be expected to take someone else's data and fully analyse it for them. My response to that sort of request would have been concise and blunt whether it had come from a colleague, my supervisor or another academic at a remote institution :-D
There is a reason why I am better left to work alone :-D

If however you want to go ahead with this, I would write it in whatever style you want. Once you are handed the raw data, all responsibility is passed to you. I wouldn't get wound up trying to second guess what the other person wants. If there are key problems for you in terms of the story of the entire work, you should talk to them. Good and regular communication is essential for successful collaborative work. You don't want to have a patchy story or spend 18 months trying to get the thing accepted for publication. Sketch the story out and get all participants in the same room to agree. This shouldn't be a problem if the participants are truly collaborative as a group of equals.

Thread: Changing research area after PhD

posted
08-Aug-18, 14:13
edited about 12 seconds later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 months ago
kikothedog is right that it can be difficult but it is a very common thing to do. People change their research focus all the time.

Thread: Submit poster abstract without yet having results or inklings about results?

posted
08-Aug-18, 01:15
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 months ago
Quote From Tudor_Queen:
Hello! There is a conference in March that I'd like to present some work at. I have the data and the idea for the analysis but haven't yet conducted the analysis. Do you think that the abstract is likely to get anywhere (be accepted) without having the results yet announced on it? Also it is an investigation with no specific hypotheses so I can't say what it would be expecting to find either. The deadline is next week so I'm just trying to decide what to do.


Personally, I wouldn't be thinking about publicising anything which wasn't virtually ready to be published.
You risk your idea being stolen.

Thread: How to do PhD with no proper technical advisory?

posted
05-Aug-18, 15:52
edited about 1 minute later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 months ago
The more I read your response TQ, the more I am convinced that we are in exact agreement.
We are both talking about taking as much personal responsibility for fixing the problem as possible rather than blaming others and waiting around for others to change. It doesnt matter really what the problem is providing it is you who drives the change. That is precisely what you did in your situation.
So, taking that into account, I see both the original poster here and stargazer on the other thread trying to "blame" others for their mindset which to me suggested they have not transitioned to the proactive mindset necessary to change their situation. It is that attitude i am trying to warn against on both threads because it is potentially very damaging.

I think we are just describing ithe same thing in different ways but the solution is the same I think.
Do you agree?

Thread: The cost of quitting a PhD

posted
05-Aug-18, 15:43
edited about 28 seconds later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 months ago
tru, I dont see anything offensive or particularly aggressive in the opinion Kamali has offered here. We are all adults and we shouldnt be treading on eggshells on behalf of other adults who are pefectly capable of fighting their own battles. In my opinion, we should allow people to be free to say what they want unless they are making an unwarranted personal attack on another poster.

That is not to say I agree with Kamalis advice. I dont. Telling someone they have made a bad mistake after they have formally quit is less than helpful.

On a serious note, if someone is so mentally fragile that a response like Kamalis causes them issues, they should consider quitting online forums and seek help from a trained professional.

Thread: How to go into new PhD with a positive mindset?

posted
04-Aug-18, 06:37
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 months ago
Following mattfab's advice would have made life a bit easier for myself.

Thread: Keeping yourself motivated around people who aren't that driven. In search of a study buddy.

posted
03-Aug-18, 16:23
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 months ago
Wow. That is a top quality rant right there :-D

The problem is that the only person worse than what you have described is the person with a chip on their shoulder. You might want to avoid being that person first and foremost before launching any sort of attack on "serious people" rewt.

Leave us serious folks alone. Just because we like work over interactions with other people, it doesnt make us incapable of collaboration, reciprocation or any other word ending in "ation". :-D

Thread: How to do PhD with no proper technical advisory?

posted
03-Aug-18, 14:24
edited about 2 minutes later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 months ago
Yeah I think we are coming at it from different perspectives. From my personal experience, I always start by assuming the problem is with the person and working backwards. There are almost always problems with the self in every situation. That is not to say that I intend to be accusatory or apportioning blame but I find it is a better place to start fighting your battles from. That is for two reasons. Firstly it immediately focusses the attention on things the person can control easily and immediately rather than having to change how the university or a supervisor or a group of other people works. Secondly, when working through a solution, it empowers the person rather than them having to face the crushing battle of deposing or changing a supervisor or university etc. Once your mental state is crushed, it is nearly impossible to fix it in situ. I discovered this approach when trying to fix my early career problems. For me, this approach was genuinely life changing and liberating.

I know your personal experience leads you to take the exact opposite approach but I think you need to pick your battles wisely. Fix the self first and only then start to tackle the other problems. I use the following all the time - "Never mind anyone else right now. Am I personally doing enough? Can I do something to help my situation?". When you try to fix other people you inevitably end up having to press the nuclear button. In your case that worked an absolute treat but the risk is huge.

If you have another approach i would be very interested in hearing it.

If any of that reads like mansplaining then let me know :-D

Thread: The cost of quitting a PhD

posted
03-Aug-18, 14:08
edited about 2 minutes later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 months ago
I think you are probably correct ToL. I still dont believe the gap is an issue but they still need to ask about it and perhaps the manner in which those questions is being answered is causing them to re-evaluate. A stumbling response or even an unusual gap in answering would raise flags because if I was interviewing, I would expect that iwan would know those types of questions were coming up and would have fully prepared solid answers for them. Any weak answer would set off loud alarm bells.

If I was being interviewed, my answer would depend on my circumstances and the reason why I quit. Only iwan knows the answer to both of these so it's hard to help. I remember going to one interview for a manual job after failing to get a graduate level job many years ago. Predictably the interviewer asked me why I was going for such a job when i had a degree. He said "how do I know you wont leave tomorrow if a better offer comes in?". I told him that whilst I could not turn down a better offer, none had come in for more than 3 months and i needed to pay my rent. I then said that for however long i was employed there, he would get 100% effort and committment from me. I remember him telling me that this was the only answer he would have accepted to that question and he asked me to start on the following Monday. Sometimes being blunt and honest is the best way to play it. By the way, it took me another 14 months to get out of that job into a graduate level role so he got his money's worth :-D

Thread: how to introduce myself in summer school

posted
03-Aug-18, 13:48
edited about 12 seconds later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 months ago
I would go with your name, your uni and then a brief couple of sentences about broadly what kind of research you are involved in. There wont be time for much more than that.

Thread: How to do PhD with no proper technical advisory?

posted
03-Aug-18, 13:45
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 months ago
You are quite correct TQ but collaboration is not about person A coming to your lab and solving your research problems for you, even if Person A is your supervisor or a lab technician.

Thread: Keeping yourself motivated around people who aren't that driven. In search of a study buddy.

posted
03-Aug-18, 13:41
edited about 15 seconds later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 months ago
There is nothing wrong with looking for someone but there is a fine line between having a companion and actuvely pursuing an act of dependency. There were a couple of things in the OP's first post which struck me as a little too close to the latter for comfort. Like I said, I may have misunderstood.

.

Thread: How to do PhD with no proper technical advisory?

posted
02-Aug-18, 23:05
edited about 7 seconds later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 months ago
You should expect to have to learn new techniques yourself. You should also expect to solve any problems that arise. That isn't your supervisor's job. Neither is it the job of anyone else in the lab. Not having enough experience is exactly the whole point. The PhD processs gains you that experience but you have to do it yourself. How much time it takes is irrelevant. This is your PhD process. It doesn't belong to anyone else.

It sounds to me like you are struggling to understand what is expected of you. What you are going through is entirely normal. Enjoy it and stop giving yourself such a hard time. The PhD is quite possibly going to be the hardest thing you will ever do in your career. It's meant to be like that.
page 1 of 59 recent posts

Postgraduate
Forum

Copyright ©2018
All rights reserved

Postgraduate Forum

Masters Degrees

PhD Opportunities

PostgraduateForum is a trading name of FindAUniversity Ltd
FindAUniversity Ltd, 77 Sidney St, Sheffield, S1 4RG, UK. Tel +44 (0) 114 268 4940 Fax: +44 (0) 114 268 5766