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rewt
Friday, 3 November 2017 at 1:37pm
Sunday, 8 December 2019 at 1:57pm
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page 1 of 40 recent posts

Thread: Is it normal to have no journal papers 1.5 years into my 3.5 year PhD (UK)?

posted
10-Mar-20, 20:46
edited about 2 seconds later
by rewt
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posted about 3 months ago
Sounds about right. I think the number of papers during a PhD (and when) depends on the project more than the student. Some projects just have more papers than others and doesn't discredit you as student. Just do the best research you can.

Thread: Bad Timing May Ruin my Future

posted
10-Mar-20, 20:23
edited about 10 seconds later
by rewt
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posted about 3 months ago
I agree with Tudor_queen and pm133. You can always take a productive break from academia or suggest your own project. However, I am going to suggest something else, a multi-disciplinary PhD. You love your field but is there another semi-related field at your university that might be willing to co-supervise you? If you have two supervisors in different fields, it will be less of a burden for your supervisors and the supervisors with admin duties/too many PhD students might be interested in supervising you then. I understand you love your field but doing it with a side relish of another field might allow you to do a PhD at your University.

Thread: How competitive are postdoc or research jobs nowadays? Tips on application?

posted
10-Mar-20, 20:10
edited about 23 seconds later
by rewt
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posted about 3 months ago
From my limited experience (still a PhD student), the post-doc market is very competitive unless you have a connection to the PI. I am sorry to say it but more PhD students graduate every year than post-doc jobs and unless you have an inside connection it will be always be competitive

On a side note my second supervisor hired a post-doc entirely because he knew one method. She never met him before the interview and he knew very little about the field except how to do a very specific polymerisation method that was crucial to the project. My supervisors attitude was she can teach him everything else and he could teach her the polymerisation method. I know it is hard to know what is important beforehand but you should be thinking what can you bring to the role/project. So instead of being generic about what you know, what makes you special?

Thread: Concerns About Sharing Research

posted
03-Mar-20, 21:18
by rewt
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posted about 3 months ago
I actively share incomplete data sets. I treat each step of the process as something different and create different files. So it easy to send a data of my results of my supervisor without giving her any of methodology or raw data. I can also send it to other people knowing that they can't steal my work but they have my final results. I don't know if it is applicable to your field but it might be an idea to only share parts of your work. Enough for them know what you are doing and what you have achieved but without any of the useful bits.

What is plagiarism. They should not publish any paper and you have proof you shared it with them if they do try to publish your work. However you are part of a team ie, the department. In my opinion they do have a right to use your work and share your results, as the most fundamental part of research is dissemination. There is no point doing great work but hiding the results and not telling anyone. In general, I think it is fair to talk about others people work if the original author told you about. By sharing the paper they might have thought that you wanted them to know and that you were going to publish it soon. Not crediting you and pretending it is was their work is wrong but using the results you presented them is fair.

Thread: You ever feel like you've lost your way?

posted
03-Mar-20, 20:40
edited about 7 seconds later
by rewt
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posted about 3 months ago
Quote From overthinker:
However, my prospective supervisor frequently butts heads with those in my department, creating an awkward working environment sometimes.


That is not a good sign. I know a couple people who have a supervisor whose has been ostracised from the department. There is open contempt for this supervisor because of a personal matter. They have trouble collaborating with other PhD students because there are several members of faculty who refuse to work/publish with this supervisor. I don't know how many other problems they have had but students have to be relatively sufficient, as there will be less support from the department.

Also personally, my supervisor gets along well in department but the lab technicians hate her. They straight up told me that they do not like her email warrior attitude. They understand I am not her and get along fine with the technicians but if I have a certain issue my supervisor can not help me. As if i involve her, my issue turns into an argument, with me stuck in the middle. It is an utter pain being stuck in the middle and it does impose some limits to what you can normally do.

Thread: Appraisal comments and how to deal with them

posted
19-Feb-20, 00:00
edited about 8 seconds later
by rewt
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posted about 4 months ago
Focus on the good parts. You mostly got positive feedback, which is what you should be thinking about. Seek to build on your strengths rather worry about your negatives. It is difficult breaking the impostor syndrome cycle but should take compliments at face value, ie as compliments. They like your work, so what is wrong. I know you feel you can be better but your supervisor has praised your work, so it must be good enough. So I don't think you should be worried about it.

Thread: Is it good for a phd topic change on first year

posted
18-Feb-20, 23:49
by rewt
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posted about 4 months ago
How big of a change is it? Most people's PhD changes through the course of 3 years as the work develops. Like, I greatly simplified my project and focused on a particular concept, as otherwise the experiments would be impossible. You will need to refer to your proposal and see how you can link it with the new topic. If it is a sub-topic in the same overall field with some cross-over you might be ok. Otherwise if it is a big jump you will need to check your funding source.

Thread: Thinking about quitting my PhD

posted
18-Feb-20, 23:44
by rewt
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posted about 4 months ago
I agree with tru, don't quit the PhD until you have a job lined up. In the meantime you can treat your PhD as strictly a job with regular hours. I think you should only do a PhD if you enjoy the topic/project, as motivation becomes a problem otherwise, like you describe. Treating the PhD as job and developing your life outside of uni will give you some much needed freedom and potentially relive you of burnout (if you have it). I see too many people be consumed by their PhD project to the point that it is their life, which is not healthy. Detaching yourself from your PhD slightly, might make you more motivated, if that makes sense.

Thread: Application rejected but potential supervisor still wants to meet?

posted
17-Feb-20, 15:47
by rewt
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posted about 4 months ago
That sounds weird. Why did they reject your before an interview but say you were the first choice? I would ask what happened and why you got rejected. There might be a simple explanation but it would definitely be interesting.

I would not assume the visit would be payed for unless they specifically say so. If you can't afford to travel, say so and they understand. They will just set up a video call and you talk that way.

Thread: 2nd supervisor

posted
17-Feb-20, 15:40
edited about 8 seconds later
by rewt
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posted about 4 months ago
You don't need to rewrite your proposal to fit a new supervisor. Just find a supervisor who is somewhat interested in your work and ask them to be a supervisor. The second supervisor could be a supervisor in name only, so that you can fill the requirements.

Thread: Reason for failing a student

posted
17-Feb-20, 15:36
by rewt
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posted about 4 months ago
Hi idemo,

I am sorry to hear you failed and offer my sympathies. Difficult examiners are awful and I don't know why your supervisors let them him barge his way onto your committee like that.

I am assuming that you failed your oral viva at an American university. While not an expert in the American system, did they not give you reasons to why they failed you? Like can you not work on amending the thesis to address their concerns or have they vague general statements. As doing corrections might faster than the legal process.

Thread: Concerned I made the right choice of university...

posted
17-Feb-20, 15:27
edited about 8 seconds later
by rewt
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posted about 4 months ago
No one cares what uni you went to if you can show results and can conduct good research. Yes there is some snobbery but academia is somewhat of a meritocracy. So if you actively commit yourself to research and show potential you will still be considered for more prestigious jobs/universities.

Thread: Funding opportunities for non-UK PhD students

posted
16-Feb-20, 22:36
edited about 6 seconds later
by rewt
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posted about 4 months ago
I think it heavily depends on the field. Research councils nearly exclusively fund UK/EU citizens. However as PhoenixFuture said interanl funding is usually opne to international students. Also external research funding bodies such as Wellcome, Trust, Leverhulme, Marie Curie, Charities etc allow international students, which could be an option

Thread: 2nd supervisor

posted
16-Feb-20, 20:53
by rewt
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posted about 4 months ago
Hi, sorry about the delay. Yes you can have supervisors from other universities. At my uni, you have to have 2 internal supervisors and no more than 5 with no other limits on external supervisors. I know someone who has 2 external supervisors (5 total) as part of a large collaboration with another uni. Though your second supervisor does not need to be an expert in your exact topic but could be in the same field or even just help you with a specific methodology.

Thread: What happens to funding if switching from full time to part time EPSRC Studentship?

posted
12-Feb-20, 12:22
edited about 20 seconds later
by rewt
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posted about 4 months ago
Your supervisors will not be happy but there is very little they can do about it. The funding and the PhD enrollment are separate, so your PhD position is not dependent on EPRSC funding. Going part time will probably stop the EPRSC funding but they can't kick you from the PhD unless you fail something.

Though, I am assuming that you are an experimental PhD student and if you go into full-time employment will you have the time to do the necessary experiments. It will be hard to manage lab commitments and work commitments which is ambitious.
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