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rewt
Friday, 3 November 2017 at 1:37pm
Sunday, 8 December 2019 at 1:57pm
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page 1 of 40 recent posts

Blog: Basic engineering

posted
02-Dec-19, 11:25
by rewt
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posted about 6 months ago
I completely agree with this. Even though I am one of the lucky few with dual British/EU citizenship I can see this problem. It is stupid that you can come to a country, get a PhD, become a specialist in a field and integrate into society to be told to go home. I wish there was some automatic mechanism for postgraduate students to get a permanent visa and pathway to citizenship. However if that was the case the universities would have to tighten up international student requirements. Unfortunately the UK appears to becoming one the worst offenders with tight immigration and I don't see it changing any time soon.

Thread: Lab rotation

posted
28-Nov-19, 22:33
edited about 1 second later
by rewt
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posted about 7 months ago
I have been to a couple of other labs in the UK for short periods. I have always went to do a specific test or experiment but I enjoyed every visit. I got to learn new methods and experience different working environments/styles. I had a purpose to be there and that purpose forced me to interact with other students. You are associating each lab with a supervisor but a lab is really a place to do work and if you don't do much work you aren't getting the maximum benefits. Though if you don't enjoy the work, you can still learn from the experience. What I am trying to say, find the positive parts of the visits otherwise you will be bogged down in the sheer futility of the whole PhD thing.

Thread: To get to know a PhD supervisor signing up under him

posted
28-Nov-19, 22:13
edited about 5 seconds later
by rewt
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posted about 7 months ago
Quote From Sashank:
But guys that still dosent answer my question, the thing I m still asking is:
What to look in a supervisor's profile, in a lab group's profile, in the lab environment before signing up and where to lookup these things ????????


Can't you do something you enjoy? Forget the supervisor, the lab environment or even the university and think what field/subject/topic you want to spend several years working on. I think if you enjoy the project everything else becomes bearable.

Thread: Dilemma about working in same department with supervisor who sexually harassed me during PhD!

posted
26-Nov-19, 20:45
edited about 8 seconds later
by rewt
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posted about 7 months ago
Sorry for the delay as I had to look through your old posts and I suggest other people to do so as well.

I think you should take the job and worry about him later. Getting a lecturer is hard enough, so don't let him harm you any more by jeopardising your career. Regardless of anything else, accept the job.

On what to do with your former supervisor, I think you should get something in writing so if he ever does anything again it will easier for his next victim to complain. It is sad I am saying this but it usually takes multiple allegations to stop someone and you shouldn't let this be brushed under the carpet. You can pursue it further if you want or help the next victim.

I also don't know how big your department is but avoiding him in the long term might be awkward. You could talk with a counsellor about him and how to eventually normalise your relationship with your former supervisor. I am not saying be friends with him or forgive him but learn be cordial back. As there are plenty lecturers in my university that do not get a long and avoid working together. You kinda work out who doesn't like who and plan around it, I don't know even know why half dislodge each other. There are literally two technicians who refuse to speak with each other and eat lunch at separate times to avoid each other at all costs. Academia is full of old grudges, grievances and quarrels, so you won't standout however most of them can be friendly when absolutely necessary.

Thread: Feeling Lost

posted
25-Nov-19, 20:23
by rewt
Avatar for rewt
posted about 7 months ago
Quote From athenian:
The Phd program is completely disorganized, no coursework, no research seminars, no collaboration between Phd students, and between students and professors, no funding, very little research activity of faculty members etc.


That sounds exactly like my university in the UK.

Though can I say that it is common for European universities to not have any coursework elements. I would say in the UK the majority of PhD courses have minimal to no coursework but PhDs are instead based around an apprenticeship and project teaching model. Where you work in partnership with your supervisor on a specific (large) project, slowly gaining skills and knowledge under their guidance. I am not saying coursework based PhDs are right or wrong but if you want one you should specifically sign up to a coursework/structured programme/ doctoral school based PhD (or whatever else they call it). I believe you are on the apprenticeship model and you should not blame your university for lack of coursework, as this is the norm.

To be honest, if you are not enjoying it, you should quit. If you said that you had an interesting project that you love or you had an amazing supervisor I would say carry on. However you said nothing positive about your current situation which is not a good sign.

Thread: Being sick and turning up late for my PhD

posted
25-Nov-19, 20:04
edited about 20 seconds later
by rewt
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posted about 7 months ago
I usually work 10am- 6pm and my supervisor is fine with it, since she knows I stay that bit later. I don't agree with clock watching but if you turn up late you should make the appearance that you all stay late. PhDs have great flexibility but you are still expected to put in the hours and get results. If you can argue both of those points to your RAs they will shut up.

Though I am in the UK with guaranteed funding and my supervisor cant strip me of it.

Thread: any point applying for phd positions with a 2.1?

posted
25-Nov-19, 11:22
edited about 29 seconds later
by rewt
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posted about 7 months ago
I personally got a 2:1 and many many other PhD students also achieved 2:1s at undergraduate level. So a 2:1 does not rule you out.

Thread: Should I go to this conference?!

posted
22-Nov-19, 09:53
edited about 4 seconds later
by rewt
Avatar for rewt
posted about 7 months ago
Yes. Go for it! I think going to conferences outside your field is incredibly useful and gives you insight on how to better apply your own work. I agree with Tudor_Queen, a poster doesn't take too long to make once you know the basics and you don't need a lot of content (use of lots of pictures).

Thread: Bewildered and confused by supervisor

posted
22-Nov-19, 09:45
edited about 27 seconds later
by rewt
Avatar for rewt
posted about 7 months ago
Quote From drwubs:
For rewt and pm133. I think you misunderstand what I was trying to say.

I don't really see how I can help you figure out what's going on with my situation

I do my best to be very clear in my communication with people


Not to be rude but if you can't explain your side of the story, it means you are not a very clear communicator.

Honestly I think your issues with your supervisor is all a misunderstanding. You both had different expectations (not assigning blame) on your relationship and it isn't working. When any working relationship breaks down the key is to understand the other persons point of view and having a honest conversation to find a compromise. I think you can fix this issue by asking your supervisor in a polite manner why do they not want you working on this paper and would he review a completed draft?

I am assuming that you have had very little contact with your supervisor since this and if so he probably does not know your concerns. He cannot change or help if you do not talk with him honestly. Though saying that your supervisor is far more experienced and you should assume he is right. Swallow your pride and try to be productive instead of vilifying him.

Thread: Do you get funding in the 4th year and do you pay for tuition fees?

posted
20-Nov-19, 20:16
edited about 14 seconds later
by rewt
Avatar for rewt
posted about 7 months ago
Usually yes but sometimes no. At my uni it varies from several thousand to as low as £300 per 6 months and the lucky few get the uni to pay for it. I think it it is stupid to charge students short term extensions, especially if it is due to reasons outside their control. Though one person I knew got his fees waived due to extenuating circumstances, surprisingly enough his supervisor was deputy head of department.

Thread: Postdoc reference

posted
18-Nov-19, 22:28
edited about 9 seconds later
by rewt
Avatar for rewt
posted about 7 months ago
I think you should take the risk. Most companies only check references after they have made the decision otherwise it would be a pain to call every reference for every application. Though could you give your old line managers as references instead as they probably be safer?

Thread: Cora

posted
18-Nov-19, 22:26
edited about 11 seconds later
by rewt
Avatar for rewt
posted about 7 months ago
You can apply anytime. Most PhDs have flexible start dates and will wait for you to finish your current studies.

Thread: MSc/MSci preference in Physics PhD applications for Oxbridge

posted
18-Nov-19, 22:24
by rewt
Avatar for rewt
posted about 7 months ago
I would choose a course you enjoy and that will allow you to maximise your potential. A lot of universities allow you to swap between Bsc and integrated masters which means you can worry about this later. Generally you want at least a masters before a PhD (though you can sometimes do without) and their is an ever so slight preferences for research focused masters over integrated masters. Goodluck!

Thread: I will deliver a guest lecture in the UK, but i do not speak English well

posted
18-Nov-19, 19:13
by rewt
Avatar for rewt
posted about 7 months ago
Having had many lecturers with bad English or a thick accent I can safely say it doesn't really matter. Some of the most memorable bits of my course was when the lecturer said something very important in stunted English.

Thread: Post. Doc. Research Associate, Post. Doc. Training Fellow and Post. Doc. Research Assistant - diff?

posted
15-Nov-19, 09:47
by rewt
Avatar for rewt
posted about 7 months ago
I think there are differences in ambition and independence. Like a research associate is the typical post-doc with a set project and supervisor but freedom of work. While an assistant is told exactly what to do and hands over the data to a supervisor. Though a post-doc fellowship is an opportunity to do your own research with minimal supervision, you also have your own budget and more is expected of you. A post-doc fellow seems very cushy and you have a lot of scope to develop your own interests and skills

Again, not an expert and my uni mostly has a post-doc associates and post-doc fellows with very few if no post-doc assistants. The research assistants usually have a Masters but interestingly enough most of the technicians have PhDs.
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