Mendeley vs EndNote vs Zotero

posted
12-Jan-11, 09:45
by Hugh
Avatar for Hugh
posted about 8 years ago
Hi,

Does anyone have any recommendations as to which software I should use to collect references?

Mendeley and Zotero are free, whereas I'd have to pay around a £100 for EndNote, to get a license on my personal machine. Which one do you use?

More on Mendeley here: http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/pda/2010/jul/05/mendeley-activate
posted
12-Jan-11, 09:47
edited about 24 seconds later
by sneaks
Avatar for sneaks
posted about 8 years ago
I use endnote, but only because its what I started the PhD with. If I had my time again I'd use Mendely because I've not heard a bad word against it, it sounds amazing and great to use if you work in multiple locations e.g. home, work, cafe etc.
posted
12-Jan-11, 09:52
by Hugh
Avatar for Hugh
posted about 8 years ago
Quote From sneaks:

I use endnote, but only because its what I started the PhD with. If I had my time again I'd use Mendely because I've not heard a bad word against it, it sounds amazing and great to use if you work in multiple locations e.g. home, work, cafe etc.


Thanks! Are you aware if there is anything I'd miss out on if I use Mendeley instead of EndNote? My university library doesn't even mention Mendeley, that is why I am slightly worried.
posted
12-Jan-11, 09:59
by sneaks
Avatar for sneaks
posted about 8 years ago
hmm, I'm not sure if you can export from google scholar - maybe someone else can confirm?
posted
12-Jan-11, 10:02
edited about 1 second later
by sneaks
Avatar for sneaks
posted
12-Jan-11, 15:28
edited about 22 seconds later
by pixie
Avatar for pixie
posted about 8 years ago
I've been using Mendeley for a couple of months now following a previous recommendation on this forum. So far it's been good and I've been able to use it all the computers I work on. The only issue I have is that as far as I can tell it doesn't support the exact same referencing format my department requires for a reference list (it may be there and my department does seem to be very particular in what they want) although admittedly I haven't spent that long going through the different formats because it's a bit boring tbh! Therefore a bit of manual editing is required.

I mostly use it offline and update it regularly so I can access my pdfs and notes anywhere. Biggest bonus is it's free and the main reason I chose it was because I had heard so many bad things about endnote both here and in my department from other PhDers.
posted
12-Jan-11, 16:13
edited about 10 seconds later
by Hugh
Avatar for Hugh
posted about 8 years ago
Quote From pixie:

I've been using Mendeley for a couple of months now following a previous recommendation on this forum. So far it's been good and I've been able to use it all the computers I work on. The only issue I have is that as far as I can tell it doesn't support the exact same referencing format my department requires for a reference list (it may be there and my department does seem to be very particular in what they want) although admittedly I haven't spent that long going through the different formats because it's a bit boring tbh! Therefore a bit of manual editing is required.


Thank you Pixie! :) As far as I know my department is happy with Harvard, which I'm sure Mendeley supports. How does Mendeley cope with pulling references from your university catalouge?
posted
12-Jan-11, 21:04
by CATE
Avatar for CATE VIP
posted about 8 years ago
I use endnote because its on the Uni system so everyone I know uses it but I gather its really difficult to get the data off for future use? So wish I had gone with something different at the start. Its quite limited for notes too. Can you put more detail in the other systems?
posted
12-Jan-11, 21:33
edited about 2 seconds later
Avatar for Clarabelle
posted about 8 years ago
I'm really liking Zotero at the moment, Cate. Zotero is a Firefox extension, so if you're an Internet Explorer type then it's not for you! It's very easy to download and, of course, free! It sits as part of your web browser (sits in the bottom right hand corner of your web browser screen and you get full screen when you click on it. You can import directly from most electronic journals and JStor etc. and can link to existing pdfs you have too.

You can use it in offline mode too but of course it won't sync to the zotero site during that time. That's the other thing I like about it - it's like having another back up as you have an online account at the zotero web site.

In terms of finding stuff, you can tag each article/ book with a series of tags and it has a powerful search tool too. Note-taking is good in the program too - you get a fully editable window and can write one long note (I've certainly not hit a limit yet) or any number of separate notes attached to the same article/book.

Doing a endnote like Cite as You Write is also well set up in Zotero - and there's a useful forum with what looks like a very personalised service for any trouble-shooting. The only negative is that it's not set up to work with Word for Mac 2010 yet but I'm sure it will be soon, so I'm going back to Word for Mac 2008 for a bit til they sort that.

Hope that review (as well as the rest on this thread) helps you make the right decision, Chococake and Cate!
posted
13-Jan-11, 11:05
by Hugh
Avatar for Hugh
posted about 8 years ago
Quote From clarabelle:

I'm really liking Zotero at the moment, Cate. Zotero is a Firefox extension, so if you're an Internet Explorer type then it's not for you! It's very easy to download and, of course, free! It sits as part of your web browser (sits in the bottom right hand corner of your web browser screen and you get full screen when you click on it. You can import directly from most electronic journals and JStor etc. and can link to existing pdfs you have too.


Clarabelle, thanks for the detailed review. I think I will give Zotero a try and see how it goes. It is free so one can't go wrong! :)
posted
13-Jan-11, 11:45
edited about 11 seconds later
by pixie
Avatar for pixie
posted about 8 years ago
Hi Chococake, you're right Mendeley does support Harvard and my department is based on Harvard with irritating minor changes! I'm not sure about getting things from uni catalogues, I tend to just download pdfs and then dump them into mendeley and this seems to work well. You can also add a web importer tool but I don't tend to use it because it just seems to import the reference but not the file. It also has a cite while you write tool which is very useful.

At least if you choose a free one and you don't like it then you won't lose any money :-)
posted
13-Jan-11, 13:20
edited about 7 seconds later
by Hugh
Avatar for Hugh
posted about 8 years ago
Quote From pixie:

Hi Chococake, you're right Mendeley does support Harvard and my department is based on Harvard with irritating minor changes! I'm not sure about getting things from uni catalogues, I tend to just download pdfs and then dump them into mendeley and this seems to work well. You can also add a web importer tool but I don't tend to use it because it just seems to import the reference but not the file. It also has a cite while you write tool which is very useful.

At least if you choose a free one and you don't like it then you won't lose any money :-)


True :). I've just downloaded Mendeley and the trial vesion of EndNote, and I have to say Mendeley just feels so much better and appealing to the eyes. EndNote feels like I'm still living in the days of Windows 1998.
posted
20-Feb-11, 19:27
Avatar for qiqqanik
posted about 8 years ago
Hello.

You may benefit from taking a look at http://www.qiqqa.com.

The software is written specifically for post graduates who need to deal with the massive amounts of documents one has to read in the course of a PHD/similar.

It aims to get you through your work quicker (hence "qiqqa"). It's free.

All the best.
posted
21-Feb-11, 16:17
edited about 17 seconds later
by Hugh
Avatar for Hugh
posted about 8 years ago
Quote From qiqqanik:

Hello.

You may benefit from taking a look at http://www.qiqqa.com.

The software is written specifically for post graduates who need to deal with the massive amounts of documents one has to read in the course of a PHD/similar.

It aims to get you through your work quicker (hence "qiqqa"). It's free.

All the best.


Hi Nik,

Qiqqa looks really good. Does it support sub-folders and also how well does it support referencing? Is it automated?

Postgraduate
Forum

Copyright ©2018
All rights reserved

Postgraduate Forum

Masters Degrees

PhD Opportunities

PostgraduateForum is a trading name of FindAUniversity Ltd
FindAUniversity Ltd, 77 Sidney St, Sheffield, S1 4RG, UK. Tel +44 (0) 114 268 4940 Fax: +44 (0) 114 268 5766