Psychology?

posted
20-Jan-13, 20:38
edited about 18 seconds later
by Pjlu
Avatar for Pjlu
posted about 5 years ago
No Sez, but I have often thought about it and researched the pathway. You know, you mentioned your age is 24 and you have one degree and a PG Dip but really want to go the Psych route. What is stopping you now?

One of the reasons I have chosen not to do the conversion course is to do with my age and circumstances. I am 49 (so old from your perspective-but I don't feel that way), and a 'mid career' teaching professional, mother of three grown children. I found later in life that I absolutely have a passion for psychology, but didn't do it in my undergrad. I first struck it properly in my Education qualifications and postgrad course work units, and found out my passion for it then. Since then I periodically want to toss in my PhD and do psych and start again-but I don't. Mainly because, as Kean Bean and Pineapple pointed out, to use psych in the way many of us want to, you have to go through SO much training-and I am not prepared to do that on top of my present job right now and I am not prepared to toss in the work I have already done for my doctorate. I get myself through this, by promising myself that when I finish this doctorate (in about four years from now-I am part-time), I will either do some foundation psych courses, (just for myself), or train as a life line counsellor and volunteer to help out and be involved in counselling in this way. It will be both my reward and a way of giving back .

But YOU are 24. You have the time to try this out if you wish. Why not? If you don't like it, you can always change it. No one expects someone at 24 to know everything they want to do in life. Many of us learnwho we are and what we want, as we try things. Good luck, Sez, and go for it.
posted
24-Jan-13, 20:45
by Sez
Avatar for Sez
posted about 5 years ago
Quote From Pjlu:
No Sez, but I have often thought about it and researched the pathway. You know, you mentioned your age is 24 and you have one degree and a PG Dip but really want to go the Psych route. What is stopping you now?

One of the reasons I have chosen not to do the conversion course is to do with my age and circumstances. I am 49 (so old from your perspective-but I don't feel that way), and a 'mid career' teaching professional, mother of three grown children. I found later in life that I absolutely have a passion for psychology, but didn't do it in my undergrad. I first struck it properly in my Education qualifications and postgrad course work units, and found out my passion for it then. Since then I periodically want to toss in my PhD and do psych and start again-but I don't. Mainly because, as Kean Bean and Pineapple pointed out, to use psych in the way many of us want to, you have to go through SO much training-and I am not prepared to do that on top of my present job right now and I am not prepared to toss in the work I have already done for my doctorate. I get myself through this, by promising myself that when I finish this doctorate (in about four years from now-I am part-time), I will either do some foundation psych courses, (just for myself), or train as a life line counsellor and volunteer to help out and be involved in counselling in this way. It will be both my reward and a way of giving back .

But YOU are 24. You have the time to try this out if you wish. Why not? If you don't like it, you can always change it. No one expects someone at 24 to know everything they want to do in life. Many of us learnwho we are and what we want, as we try things. Good luck, Sez, and go for it.


Thank you. That is very true. I hope you end up doing want you want to do, at least in some way :)

Yeh I guess if I don't at least try, I'll always be thinking 'what if?'...
posted
28-Jan-13, 06:52
edited about 1 minute later
Avatar for gossesteph
posted about 5 years ago
You can certainly continue to finish your BS in psych, but you might have to take a few extra courses to meet the PT prerequisites such as a year of bio, chem and physics.
posted
21-Dec-13, 13:02
edited about 1 second later
Avatar for metabanalysis
posted about 5 years ago
Most psychology students are women and the good news is that there are lots of good opportunities for people with psychology qualifications. But in fact you don't even need to be a graduate to get some really well-paid work helping people. A prime example is this post as an equalities officer which pays £30,000 per year pro-rata https://atsv7.wcn.co.uk/search_engine/jobs.cgi?owner=5062976&ownertype=fair&jcode=1388074&vt_template=1434&adminview=1 So if you are passionate about people's human right to access career advancement programmes for women in the academic sciences, then this is the kind of job you would really enjoy.

Hope this helps :)
posted
22-May-18, 15:13
Avatar for stefkats
posted about 6 months ago
Hi guys, I am a student in the MSc Psychology of Education (conversion course) in the University of Bristol. My Bachelors was in Primary Education and I got this qualification from Greece (I am Greek, yes). I am living in the UK less than a year and I am trying to understand how the whole thing of becoming a psychologist works. After graduating from this course I will have the much-needed GBC so technically I will be able to apply for a professional doctorate. Is that right?

I have also heard of that necessary relevant experience is also a requirement. But what kind of experience is most desirable for the counselling psychology pathway? I have worked as a primary school teacher for approximately 3 years and for a semester as a psychology assistant.

I am interested in applying for the doctorate in clinical psychology. As fas as I know, this doctorate is not funded. Also, I have read some of the requiremements and according to them, successful applicants should have a "Basic diploma in counselling skills". Does anyone know whether this is necessarily required for such a doctorate? I have searched this issue a bit and there are different levels of the counselling skills diploma.

I would appreciate to listen your opinions on the counselling psychology route and the counselling skills diploma.

Thank you in advance,
posted
05-Nov-18, 04:28
Avatar for Pharmaceutical
posted about 2 weeks ago
Career Options With a Bachelor's Degree in Psychology
Advertising Agents
Advertising careers often involve developing persuasive advertisements and researching a target audience to create product messaging. Psychology graduates are a good fit for just about any advertising career as the science of persuasion and research are major topics of this undergraduate major.

Career Counselor
A career counselor your goal is to help career oriented students and job seekers discover their potential. Working as a career counselor you'll assist people perform self assessments, find careers, make career changes or in vocational rehabilitiation. Not only is being a career counselor fulfilling, psychology graduates are uniquely qualified to help individuals in the career discovery process - since some much of career discoverly involves self discovery.

Case Manager
Case managers, also referred to as social and human service assistants, provide advice and counseling to people in difficult situations. They help develop treatment and recovery plans, identify service providers, monitor client progress, and coordinate with other health and human service providers. Not only should case managers have a compassionate heart, they need to be critical thinkers and understand human nature and behavior. Individuals who complete a bachelor's degree in psychology are well qualified to excel as case managers.

Child Care Worker
Earning a degree in psychology allows graduates to work directly in psychology by becoming a partial care worker in a mental health setting such as child care. Childcare workers work in daycare, after-school programs and other child care settings.

Laboratory Assistant
Pursuing a career as a laboratory assistant is a great way to put a bachelor's degree in psychology to good use. Laboratory assistants are heavily involved in research and experimental psychology, two subjects covered in my undergraduate psychology programs. Psychology lab assistants often work in government agencies, university psychology programs, and private sector business that studies human behavior.

Market Researcher
Earning a bachelor's degree in psychology is great preparation for a career as a market reseacher. Psychology students are well versed in statistical analysis and scientific methodologies - useful skills when it comes to performing research tasks including collecting and analyzing data, conducting interviews and performing opinion polls.

Psychiatric Technician


Probation and Parole Officer


Rehabilitation Specialist


Sales Representative

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