Social Research Method

posted
18-Feb-14, 20:32
edited about 4 minutes later
Avatar for explorer1
posted about 5 years ago
I am interested to do research on schooling system and its role in reproduction of race and gender inequality. Overall, this research attempt to analyse the current school curriculum, teaching methodologies and student perceptions on schooling. I have tentatively planing to do semi-structure interviews, focus group discussion, and field notes.I want to visit at least 2 schools from two different regions and 14 children ( girls age of 12-16) from each school. ( 7 children from school and 7 from school drop out children).
Similarly, I like to do focus group discussion with same children parents ( separately) and schools teacher separately).
Do you have any suggestion that I might do to collect the empirical data?

Thanks
posted
19-Feb-14, 01:09
by TheReal
Avatar for TheReal
posted about 5 years ago
But why do you assume schooling system or curriculum is responsible for gender and race inequality? It may involve other factors e.g. societal values, upbringing pattern and so many other things. Do you also plan to suggest bring deal with this inequality?
posted
19-Feb-14, 08:58
Avatar for explorer1
posted about 5 years ago
Quote From TheReal:
But why do you assume schooling system or curriculum is responsible for gender and race inequality? It may involve other factors e.g. societal values, upbringing pattern and so many other things. Do you also plan to suggest bring deal with this inequality?
Hi, TheReal
Thanks for your message. I am fully agree with you that there are so many factors that involve in social inequality. However, in this research context, I am just trying to narrow down the subject area within school, so that it would be easy and does not take much time. However, I am particularly seeking suggestion on research methodology and tools for this research project. If you guys are already done such reseach, I hope you will share with us your experiences and other difficulties.
Thanks
posted
19-Feb-14, 14:31
Avatar for metabanalysis
posted about 5 years ago
Hi explorer1. Congratulations on choosing this vitally important topic. There is sooooo much sexism in education these days that the very thought of it can make me physically ill for days on end. If you are looking for advice on research methodology and tools can I suggest IPA analysis with NVivo software.
posted
19-Feb-14, 15:44
Avatar for explorer1
posted about 5 years ago
Quote From metabanalysis:
Hi explorer1. Congratulations on choosing this vitally important topic. There is sooooo much sexism in education these days that the very thought of it can make me physically ill for days on end. If you are looking for advice on research methodology and tools can I suggest IPA analysis with NVivo software.
Hi , Thank you very much for message. I have still not done fieldwork. However, I am preparing for it. Do you have any ideas what type of questionnaire would be best for asking with schooled-children ? and never-schooled children ? What about focus group discussion? How can I proceed on it?
posted
20-Feb-14, 07:29
by emmaki
Avatar for emmaki
posted about 5 years ago
I think that firstly you have to see where you will find participants. I mean, it's obviously OK with children who are in schools, but what about the never-schooled ones?

Then, if I were you I would look at other studies on similar subjects and see their methodology. I know there are plenty of studies from alla around the world, so, it won't be that difficult.

After that, you will form your own research methodology.

I don't think that anybody can advise you to choose this or that methodology. After all, it is your research and you are the only one who knows exactly what you want to study
posted
20-Feb-14, 07:41
edited about 21 seconds later
Avatar for DrJeckyll
posted about 5 years ago
I come from the science, and I think that your sample is too small. This limits the generalisability of your findings.
Consult with a statistician early when planning out the fieldwork. In order to control for other factors, you need more schools ( level2 units), which might be more important than number of students (level 1 units).

Good luck
posted
20-Feb-14, 09:43
by emmaki
Avatar for emmaki
posted about 5 years ago
Quote From DrJeckyll:
I come from the science, and I think that your sample is too small. This limits the generalisability of your findings.
Consult with a statistician early when planning out the fieldwork. In order to control for other factors, you need more schools ( level2 units), which might be more important than number of students (level 1 units).

Good luck


In qualitative study you don't have to make generalisations. You can study X at a certain area and in a ceratin time period (i.e. when the research takes place).
e.g. how do girls aged 10-12 that live on a road full of foreigners perceive 'race'...... Or something like that
posted
23-Feb-14, 18:03
edited about 7 seconds later
Avatar for joanna1st
posted about 5 years ago
Don't research the children, take a closer look at their parents. This is where such problems first set foot in a child's life.
posted
23-Feb-14, 19:03
edited about 21 seconds later
Avatar for AislingB
posted about 5 years ago
Hi explorer1,

I agree with enmaki. I would read lots of qualitative studies which have focussed on issues of race, gender and education. I would also do a pilot study and spend some time analysing the pilot data and reflecting on whether my interview/focus group questions could be improved before going for the main data collection. I changed my questions quite a lot after my pilot study. If it's qualitative it doesn't have to be large scale, so two sites should be fine - it might even be better to do a more in-depth ethnographic study of just one site.
posted
23-Feb-14, 19:05
edited about 1 minute later
by wowzers
Avatar for wowzers
posted about 5 years ago
That's a lot of stuff to cover! Do you have a hypothesis on how they are reproduced that you are working from or are you going to use the data to generate your own theory. E.g. There's an American analysis on how your name reproduces inequality through teacher expectations and he started with a hypothesis whilst Willis in Learning to Labour looked at why working class boys got working class jobs (reproduction of class inequality in school) and he generated theory from the data.

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