Might fail master's, should I drop out?

posted
27-May-15, 07:41
Avatar for berrioop
posted about 5 years ago
Quick background:

Undergrad: High distinction in history, graduated top of class from a mid-tier UK university

Master's:

Tuition fee funded master's at a top UK university. My course was completely not what I expected (the papers I wanted to sit were discontinued the year I joined), I had a very difficult time, developed depression and had other symptoms. I couldn't sit my final exams, left for two terms and now I am back for my exams. In the period I was away was diagnosed with MS (multiple sclerosis) and I have depression, which has worsened since I have come back because I need to deal with everything alone and I am so exhausted. And my GP isn't helpful. I want to go home because I am finding it very hard to deal with things on my own.

I don't see the value in this degree because I want to work in a completely different sector when I am done (I have a year-long research internship ahead of me that I can do from home) and I just want to get home, meet my specialist and learn to deal with my condition better. I live in another country and have access to private healthcare and can go back to my specialist. Also, I wish to apply to the US for further studies in a different subject (related to my research internship).

Should I leave? I am massively underprepared, feel ill all the time and fatigued, and my depression and MS symptoms keep getting worse.
posted
27-May-15, 17:21
edited about 24 minutes later
Avatar for KeaneFan
posted about 5 years ago
Having had some set backs, my main advice (if it was me) would be how would you feel if you barely pass it and receive poor grades? How would putting them down on application forms make you feel, or would you rather say 'I was unwell, full stop'... Here is my excellent work the following year. Equally, you have MS. That's a black and white issue. Nobody can accuse you of making up excuses. So it's about you and what makes you happiest. Take care
posted
27-May-15, 17:56
edited about 8 minutes later
Avatar for berrioop
posted about 5 years ago
Quote From KeaneFan:
Having had some set backs, my main advice (if it was me) would be how would you feel if you barely pass it and receive poor grades? How would putting them down on application forms make you feel, or would you rather say 'I was unwell, full stop'... Here is my excellent work the following year. Equally, you have MS. That's a black and white issue. Nobody can accuse you of making up excuses. So it's about you and what makes you happiest. Take care


That makes a lot of sense. I don't think that at this point failing will help me in any way. I have always been very academic and I have found it frustrating to struggle and this degree is not a reflection of my potential. And you're right, I have medical reasons to leave. My university annoyingly only grants 'pass' (60) or 'distinction' (70 and above) so I run a real risk of failing because I can't concentrate and my symptoms make it so difficult to do anything for extended periods. Thank you.
posted
28-May-15, 16:46
edited about 17 seconds later
Avatar for berrioop
posted about 5 years ago
I am so so stressed. I feel like I have messed everything up and ruined everything.
posted
28-May-15, 17:07
Avatar for HazyJane
posted about 5 years ago
It sounds as if your Masters is not central to your future plans. Finishing it well would have been nice, but there are times in life when one has to cut one's losses, particularly where one's health and wellbeing are at stake.

If you have confirmation of your next move, then continuing with something you 'don't see value in' is likely to be demoralising and very hard. It's going to be tough to let it go, if that's what you decide to do, but in five years time you may well look back and consider that doing so wasn't that big a deal in the long run.

Good luck with whatever you choose.
posted
02-Jun-15, 04:50
Avatar for berrioop
posted about 5 years ago
Quote From HazyJane:
It sounds as if your Masters is not central to your future plans. Finishing it well would have been nice, but there are times in life when one has to cut one's losses, particularly where one's health and wellbeing are at stake.

If you have confirmation of your next move, then continuing with something you 'don't see value in' is likely to be demoralising and very hard. It's going to be tough to let it go, if that's what you decide to do, but in five years time you may well look back and consider that doing so wasn't that big a deal in the long run.

Good luck with whatever you choose.


I have decided to leave but not sure whether to put my degree on hold. The reason I am finding it so hard to give it up is that it's C (not typing the university name because i dont want it to come up in google search, but it's the top university in this country at the moment). And I was awarded a prestigious scholarship to attend this place. And it's making me so miserable to have to give this up; on the other hand, the amount of stress this degree has provided me is just crazy. And a part of me wants to leave this behind.

Also how would I show this on my CV? I dont want a two year gap.
posted
02-Jun-15, 09:44
edited about 5 seconds later
by Dunham
Avatar for Dunham
posted about 5 years ago
Show it as it is. I guess it is already an accomlishment to get the scholarship and be accepted there, so tell them that you had to leave due to medical issues. I would not mention depressions but MS is a serious condition and I don't believe anyone would hold that against you.

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