I do not know exminers before Ph.D submission.

posted
16-Nov-15, 01:59
Avatar for Daniel_123_
posted about 5 years ago
Hello everybody,

I just submitted my Ph.D. thesis but my supervisors did not let me know yet the names of my internal and external examiners.

Is it common in UK? and what can I do, have to complain? I did wrong to submit my work before to know the examiners?

Please any advice are highly appreciated.

Thank you very much.
posted
16-Nov-15, 09:43
Avatar for TreeofLife
posted about 5 years ago
This is totally normal. I knew my internal, but not my external upon submission. Why would you want to complain?
posted
16-Nov-15, 10:04
edited about 15 seconds later
Avatar for Barramack
posted about 5 years ago
Check your university policy for doctoral degree examination. At my (Australian) institution, I had three examiners chosen by my thesis committee. I still don't know their names, even though my PhD has been conferred. I could have found out their names during the examination period, but I chose not to, because it didn't really matter anyway. Now I've finished I might enquire, just out of casual interest.
posted
16-Nov-15, 11:05
Avatar for DocInsanity
posted about 5 years ago
It can be difficult to find examiners that fit your subject. I didn't have my internal examiner before submission.
posted
16-Nov-15, 11:34
by Eds
Avatar for Eds
posted about 5 years ago
Which begs the question, who was supervising you?!
posted
16-Nov-15, 15:15
Avatar for Daniel_123_
posted about 5 years ago
Thank you indeed for the reply.

I concern about it as the thesis should be also based on the examiners (e.g. references, different views, etc.). Obviously, if you do not them you cannot fit your work.

So I should wait.. However, I spoke with other colleagues also from other universities and nobody had the same situation.

Thank you.
posted
16-Nov-15, 16:00
Avatar for TreeofLife
posted about 5 years ago
I think it totally depends on which examiner you get. My examiner wasn't really related to my work so there was no way I could have included his papers anyway.

But I wouldn't worry about this anyway - worst case they will just tell you to add a few of their papers as a correction.
posted
16-Nov-15, 17:41
Avatar for DocInsanity
posted about 5 years ago
I have never heard of the idea that you have to know your examiners to write your thesis. The thesis is not meant to be a work of sycophancy, it should stand by itself.
posted
16-Nov-15, 17:51
by Eds
Avatar for Eds
posted about 5 years ago
And in any case, wouldn't you expect to know OF your examiners, if only because their work must interstect with the thesis somewhere.
posted
16-Nov-15, 20:26
edited about 3 seconds later
Avatar for DocInsanity
posted about 5 years ago
Well exactly - if their work's relevant, then clearly it would be an even more obvious omission. If it's not, then it would look quite odd.
posted
17-Nov-15, 06:25
edited about 29 seconds later
Avatar for MeaninginLife
posted
17-Nov-15, 09:44
Avatar for TreeofLife
posted about 5 years ago
I like this rule: "Supervisors are required to consult with their students...the names of suggested examiners". I wish my supervisors had followed it!

And this: "For instance, there is now research to suggest that experienced (rather than inexperienced) examiners will be more likely to see the thesis within the context of the research education experience, i.e. the equivalent of 3-4 years work, not a 'Nobel Prize'." My external should have made note of that!
posted
17-Nov-15, 12:46
by Eds
Avatar for Eds
posted about 5 years ago
I've already been told... that any 'experts' I am hypercritical of just won't be asked!!!
posted
17-Nov-15, 13:15
edited about 16 seconds later
Avatar for DocInsanity
posted about 5 years ago
Examiners do need to be chosen carefully, that's for sure. Some people are just difficult. My external examiner was the main UK guy in my field, but my citations of his work were favourable.
posted
18-Nov-15, 14:25
Avatar for Daniel_123_
posted about 5 years ago
Thank you everybody for the reply.

Thinking that my potential examiner could be not an expert in my field, I am not really comfortable with that, since he/she needs to assess a work that does not know very well.

Yes, examiners should be carefully selected, and the Ph.D. candidate should be involved in the decision, but unfortunately it is not always the case.

Thank you MeaninginLife for the link, very useful.

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