How can I get PhD offers? Please help

posted
01-Dec-17, 01:31
edited about 19 minutes later
Avatar for chaotic1328
posted about 2 weeks ago

We genrally don't allow people to do an undergraduate degree without displaying excellence at school level and in my opinion we should not allow anyone to undertake a PhD without displaying excellence at undergrad level as a bare minimum. That seems perfectly reasonable to me.


Ouch! I don't have any A levels (dropped out half way through), plus my O level result aren't much to write home about either. I enrolled onto my undergrad course as a mature student of 27 after my divorce and felt that I wanted to do something different. I got in based partly on my experience of running my own business (I used my accountant as one of the referees!) and partly on my ability to charm the course leader...:) )

Did very badly in the first year, and just scraped 40% pass mark to progress, lucky that did not count towards the final honours. Second and final years were very much better, and I was told by my dissertation supervisor that I only missed a First due to the marking system (not sure if he was trying to make me feel better, or if it was true), and my dissertation was marked down by the second marker to ensure I get a very high 2:1 rather than a First.

Just trying to say that there can be late developers, who for whatever reason, did not do that well at school/undergrad level, and should be given another chance to shine. I certainly wouldn't have contemplated another two years of A level study, or heaven forbid, some more O level courses, and would just decide that education wasn't for me if I wasn't offered a place. Not being vain in anyway, but I certainly don't think I've devalued the undergrad degree in any way, nor cheapen the Master's that I completed this September, and I wouldn't like to think that I would contribute in any way in devaluing a PhD if my funding application for 2018 is successful...:)
posted
01-Dec-17, 12:52
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 2 weeks ago
Quote From chaotic1328:

That would be extremely unfair to limit the top grades to that extent. Your grade should be a personal achievement and not based on how good the rest of the class is.


But isn't excellence comparative in a competitive system?


No I don't think so.
Excellence is an absolute not a relative thing in my opinion.
My ability to excel at playing the guitar doesn't depend on how good you are for example.
posted
01-Dec-17, 12:58
edited about 16 seconds later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 2 weeks ago
Quote From chaotic1328:

We genrally don't allow people to do an undergraduate degree without displaying excellence at school level and in my opinion we should not allow anyone to undertake a PhD without displaying excellence at undergrad level as a bare minimum. That seems perfectly reasonable to me.


Ouch! I don't have any A levels (dropped out half way through), plus my O level result aren't much to write home about either. I enrolled onto my undergrad course as a mature student of 27 after my divorce and felt that I wanted to do something different. I got in based partly on my experience of running my own business (I used my accountant as one of the referees!) and partly on my ability to charm the course leader...:) )

Did very badly in the first year, and just scraped 40% pass mark to progress, lucky that did not count towards the final honours. Second and final years were very much better, and I was told by my dissertation supervisor that I only missed a First due to the marking system (not sure if he was trying to make me feel better, or if it was true), and my dissertation was marked down by the second marker to ensure I get a very high 2:1 rather than a First.

Just trying to say that there can be late developers, who for whatever reason, did not do that well at school/undergrad level, and should be given another chance to shine. I certainly wouldn't have contemplated another two years of A level study, or heaven forbid, some more O level courses, and would just decide that education wasn't for me if I wasn't offered a place. Not being vain in anyway, but I certainly don't think I've devalued the undergrad degree in any way, nor cheapen the Master's that I completed this September, and I wouldn't like to think that I would contribute in any way in devaluing a PhD if my funding application for 2018 is successful...:)


Ouch indeed :-D
There are always exceptions and as I said in a previous post, I had to improve from a 2:2 myself before I could take the PhD.
In fairness, school level education is such a low barrier to clear that this probably wasn't the best example for me to give. Mind you I dont recall making any comment about devaluing the undergraduate degree. You got the high 2:1 at undergrad so clearly my comment about devaluing the PhD wasn't aimed at you.

Good luck with your application.
posted
01-Dec-17, 20:20
edited about 11 seconds later
Avatar for chaotic1328
posted about 2 weeks ago
[/quote]

No I don't think so.
Excellence is an absolute not a relative thing in my opinion.
My ability to excel at playing the guitar doesn't depend on how good you are for example.[/quote]

But surely if everyone can play the guitar like Hendrix, then that's the norm rather than anything out of the ordinary? And only people who player better would be classified as 'excellent'?
posted
01-Dec-17, 20:25
Avatar for chaotic1328
posted about 2 weeks ago

Ouch indeed :-D
There are always exceptions and as I said in a previous post, I had to improve from a 2:2 myself before I could take the PhD.
In fairness, school level education is such a low barrier to clear that this probably wasn't the best example for me to give. Mind you I dont recall making any comment about devaluing the undergraduate degree. You got the high 2:1 at undergrad so clearly my comment about devaluing the PhD wasn't aimed at you.

Good luck with your application.


Take this as banter rather than anything else, as my head is aching from trying to get two proposas done to what they expect, and so am using this forum as a welcome distraction. I was making the logical deduction that if low undergrad degree grades devalue a PhD, then by the same token, non-existent A levels would devalue an undergrad degree...:)
posted
02-Dec-17, 11:17
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 1 week ago
Quote From chaotic1328:


No I don't think so.
Excellence is an absolute not a relative thing in my opinion.
My ability to excel at playing the guitar doesn't depend on how good you are for example.[/quote]

But surely if everyone can play the guitar like Hendrix, then that's the norm rather than anything out of the ordinary? And only people who player better would be classified as 'excellent'?[/quote]

When that happens, come back to me and we can re-evaluate. :-D
posted
02-Dec-17, 11:25
edited about 4 minutes later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 1 week ago
Quote From chaotic1328:

Ouch indeed :-D
There are always exceptions and as I said in a previous post, I had to improve from a 2:2 myself before I could take the PhD.
In fairness, school level education is such a low barrier to clear that this probably wasn't the best example for me to give. Mind you I dont recall making any comment about devaluing the undergraduate degree. You got the high 2:1 at undergrad so clearly my comment about devaluing the PhD wasn't aimed at you.

Good luck with your application.


Take this as banter rather than anything else, as my head is aching from trying to get two proposas done to what they expect, and so am using this forum as a welcome distraction. I was making the logical deduction that if low undergrad degree grades devalue a PhD, then by the same token, non-existent A levels would devalue an undergrad degree...:)


A levels have never been mandatory in order to enter university. You have always been able to enter without them. A few hundred thousand Scots manage it every year ;-)
posted
04-Dec-17, 16:52
edited about 1 minute later
by swadeep
Avatar for swadeep
posted about 1 week ago
Hi, I am from Engineering backgound- Master's of Technology in Electronics & Communication Engg., with 5.8 years of work exp. (Teaching, Corporate , Voluntary exp.).Now, i want to pursue my PhD in Management field. Do i need to have a master's degree in Management for this?
My areas of interest is- The factors that affect the competitive performance of an organization and its employee-organization relationship, and how personality, wellbeing at work, leadership, coaching, positive psychology, personal development, communication, reflection, learning, team building, emotions, hope, conflict management, inclusion and diversity affects an organization its business and strategies. How i can get admission for this? Kindly share your suggestions.
posted
04-Dec-17, 16:54
edited about 16 seconds later
by swadeep
Avatar for swadeep
posted about 1 week ago
Hi, I am from Engineering background- Master's of Technology in Electronics & Communication Engg., with 5.8 years of work exp. (Teaching, Corporate , Voluntary exp.).Now, i want to pursue my PhD in Management field. Do i need to have a master's degree in Management for this?
My areas of interest is- The factors that affect the competitive performance of an organization and its employee-organization relationship, and how personality, wellbeing at work, leadership, coaching, positive psychology, personal development, communication, reflection, learning, team building, emotions, hope, conflict management, inclusion and diversity affects an organization its business and strategies. How i can get admission for this? Kindly share your suggestions.[/quote]
posted
08-Dec-17, 20:33
edited about 29 seconds later
Avatar for ringsound
posted about 1 week ago
OP, what I am going to say will draw a lot of hate, but this is my experience
just few months before my A-level, I have some serious family issue, leading to mostly B in my AL
and on top of that, I return to my Home country which have less than 10 Universities and only 20% qualified students able to get a degree
I end up doing an ordinary degree with about 60%, after I graduated, I was offer a Teaching assistant post, and I enroll my PGDE. When I have my training, my supervisor told me, it will be extremely hard for any school hire me because of my degree isn't a Hons Degree. Yet, I end up teaching in 3 different school, junior and senior before I lose hope in the system.
Then I try to shift my career and have my first MSc, result in 3.16 GPA in 4.0 system, not something bright, and a year ago I finish my 2nd MSc with 67% overall score. However, I received 3 funded PhD studentship offers, and even 1 interview from Oxford.
Examination does not always reflect how a student doing, in my year of teaching I have seen straight As student who turn out to be "not very smart", I have also seen a very smart student who only got D at best. Some student are better at doing exam, some excel in other form of assessment.
Applying a PhD studentship is not applying a job, you will spend you next 3 years working in that dept., and with those team, the supervisor is looking for someone not only have the intelligence, but also genuine interest and commitment to the project. You should draft an e-mail outlining you interest and discussion with the supervisor, it may not guarantee you an interview, but you will gain valuable experience as well as leaving a good impression to the supervisor
posted
12-Dec-17, 18:17
edited about 26 seconds later
by bignige
Avatar for bignige
posted about 3 days ago
Here here.

Well said Ringsound!

N
posted
12-Dec-17, 19:11
edited about 14 seconds later
Avatar for JonBHarris
posted about 3 days ago
57% is a decent score to be accepted for a PHD course. Do your research and find right institute for your subject. You may consult your topic before sending a proposal.
posted
13-Dec-17, 00:03
Avatar for chaotic1328
posted about 3 days ago
Quote
Then I try to shift my career and have my first MSc, result in 3.16 GPA in 4.0 system, not something bright, and a year ago I finish my 2nd MSc with 67% overall score. However, I received 3 funded PhD studentship offers, and even 1 interview from Oxford.


That is indeed impressive. What field you are in, and what sort of funded place were you offered? I am hoping to start a funded PhD in 2018, and would appreciate any advice on the funding process, primarily as back-up in case in my first choice doesn't come through.

Thanks.

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