Training courses and/or skills on CV?

posted
04-Apr-19, 10:57
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 2 months ago
I very consciously want to avoid CV 'padding' but I wonder whether training courses might be considered relevant? Some job specs are so broad that it's difficult to tailor your CV.

These sorts of training course are highly specialised (e.g. handling and packing museum objects) but none ended up with qualifications. There are 6 courses in total and only one of them entailed a competitive application.

Alternatively, I could extract some of the stuff I learnt and put it in a 'Skills' section near the end of my CV.

My CV is otherwise pretty decent (couple of short-term research positions, articles, grants, conference papers, etc).
posted
07-Apr-19, 08:16
edited about 29 seconds later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 2 months ago
I have no idea what academia looks for in a CV (beyond "who you know", who really does) but, as regards industry, experience trumps training.
posted
07-Apr-19, 12:52
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 2 months ago
Thanks for this, pm133 :)
posted
09-Apr-19, 10:18
edited about 40 seconds later
Avatar for Tudor_Queen
posted about 2 months ago
Hi Nesrine!

I think I would include those things - if the job were specifically requiring/desiring those skills. On one of my recent CVs I had a heading called "Skills and training relevant to xxx position", and then I had four bullet points under it with the most relevant things. I don't do this every time, it just seemed right for this particular thing I was going for (and indeed it was shortlisted).

One of the best pieces of advice someone gave me once when I didn't get a job and I asked for feedback was about how rubbish my cover letter was (she said it much more kindly than that though). The cover letter/personal statement should refer to every required and desired bit of skill and experience outlined on the job spec, and have examples of how you have demonstrated them or if you haven't then that you are extremely keen to do so. Anything that you're adding that isn't strongly related to the job spec, they probably are just filtering out. So if every sentence and point you make can be relevant - and have real examples - then they are going to find it hard to resist finding out more about you. I found it really helpful.

I am not sure if this helps but also maybe get some feedback from someone on the actual CV - maybe the career service at your uni or similar?

Tudor
posted
10-Apr-19, 12:31
edited about 10 seconds later
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 2 months ago
Thanks for this, Tudor! You and pm133 are always so helpful :)

I will try to make sure my cover letter is really tailored to the job spec - sometimes not easy when it's so vague! I will also try to get some feedback from someone who knows more about this than me.
posted
11-Apr-19, 02:59
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 2 months ago
Just to back up TQs comment.
That advice is absolute gold.
Don't just say you have a desired skill. Prove it.
If you can do that for 60% of the skills required and mitigate away the others you'll find you'll get more interview offers.
I was taught that 30 years ago and it transformed my job hunting success.

Postgraduate
Forum

Copyright ©2018
All rights reserved

Postgraduate Forum

Masters Degrees

PhD Opportunities

PostgraduateForum is a trading name of FindAUniversity Ltd
FindAUniversity Ltd, 77 Sidney St, Sheffield, S1 4RG, UK. Tel +44 (0) 114 268 4940 Fax: +44 (0) 114 268 5766