Why does a mismatch between a supervisor and a research scholar takes place???

posted
03-Dec-19, 13:41
edited about 1 second later
by Sashank
Avatar for Sashank
posted about 2 months ago
Although there are fully completed profiles and CVS of professors out there on university websites, although we have systems like lab rotations at universities which actively encourage scholars to try out labs and groups and supervisors before actually signing up for a PhD , although there are orientation programs and so many other services provided for helping scholars find a best fit supervisor, why does still a mismatch between a supervisor and a scholar take place which had even lead to high attrition rates of PhD ???? Where are we lagging????
posted
03-Dec-19, 14:24
Avatar for PhoenixFortune
posted about 2 months ago
Quote From Sashank:
Although there are fully completed profiles and CVS of professors out there on university websites, although we have systems like lab rotations at universities which actively encourage scholars to try out labs and groups and supervisors before actually signing up for a PhD , although there are orientation programs and so many other services provided for helping scholars find a best fit supervisor, why does still a mismatch between a supervisor and a scholar take place which had even lead to high attrition rates of PhD ???? Where are we lagging????


Supervision style, feedback methods, and general personality are hard to establish through online profiles or short visits. That's partly why a PhD is such a leap of faith. The supervisor-supervisee relationship can also break down after a while (even if it started off very positively) for a number of external reasons.
posted
03-Dec-19, 15:54
edited about 4 minutes later
by PhDhere
Avatar for PhDhere
posted about 2 months ago
you know people for real only after you spend significant amount of time with them. Short-term visits can give an indication but it is never a 100% predictor of the reality.

Not to mention most people (whether supervisor or supervisee) are good at putting on masks revealing only what is appealing. The masks hardly stand the test of time though.

c'est la vie
posted
03-Dec-19, 16:33
Avatar for bewildered
posted about 2 months ago
I also think that very few prospective PhD students can foresee what doing a PhD is really like. Doing well on a taught course doesn't mean that you'll necessarily thrive on or enjoy doing a PhD. Supervisors can't change the realities of it, and it does mean some who are unsuited to independent research will fail upgrades. If that happens, it's easier psychologically to blame everyone but yourself. Similarly, students' situations change - ill-health, interests, career ideas - there are many things that prevent completion however good the supervisory relationship is. In other words attrition rates are also if not more about student performance and circumstances, as you can change supervisors but it's not so easy to fix other things.

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