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TreeofLife
Tuesday, 12 April 2011 at 3:58pm
Friday, 26 April 2019 at 5:18pm
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page 1 of 189 recent posts

Thread: Doing the Second PhD in a Different Subject

posted
13-Jun-18, 11:53
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posted about 1 year ago
There's no point in doing another PhD. You need to think outside the box. Apply for more postdocs, even if only slightly related to your field. I've seen loads of people switching fields after a PhD. Apply for postdocs in Europe.

Thread: research assistant

posted
13-Jun-18, 11:51
edited about 26 seconds later
Avatar for TreeofLife
posted about 1 year ago
She might have millions of dollars, but that's earmarked for other things, not to pay your salary.

I'm assuming you're from the US, so I'll mention this based on my experience there.

Yes, even techs in academic labs in university make $40-50k, so you are definitely being exploited. You can make about $60k in industry with a BSc... I'd go and look at industry jobs.

Or consider getting a PhD. Post docs start on ~$40k, but as I'm sure you're aware, you'll be on that for a number of years, have to move around, and may never get a permanent academic job.

Or talk to your boss and ask for a pay rise or if you can do a PhD there.

Thread: Funding allocation decision (data analysis)

posted
04-Jun-18, 18:28
edited about 21 seconds later
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posted about 1 year ago
I don't work in social sciences, but this type of thing - doing the work and worrying about how to analyse it later - seems pretty normal to me. Not good, but normal.

Thread: Can I email my external examiner directly?

posted
04-Jun-18, 18:26
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posted about 1 year ago
I don't think you are supposed to have contact with your examiners post viva, except to confirm corrections, especially if it is your internal that is supposed to sign them off. This a a very busy time of year for academics due to all the exam marking, so you might not hear for another couple of weeks. I would chase it with your internal and supervisor and tell them the importance of it.

It's not just the external you have to wait for either. If you miss the June exam board at my uni, you won't be officially awarded the PhD until the next exam board in Sept/Oct.

You should also explain the situation to your expected employer. Can't they take you as a Research Assistant and then upgrade you to a Research Associate once you are awarded the degree? That's what's normally happens.

Thread: To PhD or not to PhD?

posted
03-Jun-18, 17:08
edited about 11 seconds later
Avatar for TreeofLife
posted about 1 year ago
Quote From Rachierara13:
[quote]

I don't suppose you know of anyone that has signed up for a part time PhD and been allowed to submit it in 4 years because they had done it a bit quicker than anticipated?

I used to have my heart set on academia but when I actually spoke to my lecturers about it they were very honest with me about the downsides and I personally couldn't handle the rejection letters when trying to get published or cope with the pressure of conferences and, as I understand it, these components are part of the job and you have to publish to stay relevant/employed. I love the idea of the actual teaching seminar/lecture part of it though.


There's minimum submission times, so for part time it's usually 5.5 years.

To put in perspective, I'm on a full time teaching contract and I give about 15 lectures a year. More seminars and practical classes sure, but the actual "teaching" time is a fraction of the job.

Thread: To PhD or not to PhD?

posted
03-Jun-18, 12:30
Avatar for TreeofLife
posted about 1 year ago
Quote From Rachierara13:


This might sound like a silly question, but do all students doing a PhD HAVE to teach and prepare materials for seminar groups alonside their research, or is that only if said person wants to enter that career and needs/wants the experience?


No you don't have to but you may as well. I think it's about taking advantage of the opportunities you're given. You don't know what you would after a PhD and if not participating in academic things gives you a disadvantage, then that's a bit silly when it didn't have to be like that.

All the things I did alongside my PhD helped me to get my academic job. I doubt I would have got it without it and it would have made it a lot more difficult if I had less experience.

Thread: The worst day of my life (VIVA horror experience)

posted
01-Jun-18, 13:56
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posted about 1 year ago
Quote From Mattfabb:


Also, sorry to point this out, but 'worse day of your life'? I guess you never lost anybody and your family has been blessed with perfect health. lucky you.


I'd say my viva was one of the worst times of my life too - but it's only a terrible week out of thousands of better weeks and I'm over it. I've had far worse experiences in other ways but it still ranks up there.

Lots of people are very involved emotionally in their theses for years so, yes, it is traumatic when these achievements are ripped from you. Don't belittle other people's experiences. People have the right to feel different things about different events.

Thread: PhD at Salford University

posted
01-Jun-18, 13:52
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posted about 1 year ago
We are not going to be able to give you advice about unis we don't go to. Salford is not a fantastic uni if you believe league tables: https://www.theguardian.com/education/ng-interactive/2018/may/29/university-league-tables-2019

It's 88 out of 121 in the UK. It's not in the Russell group. But much depends on your supervisors as research area so it's hard to say how good it is.

If it's the only offer you have you may as well take it, especially if you are struggling to get others. Your PhD will be what you make it.

Thread: Small Conference Grants

posted
01-Jun-18, 13:46
edited about 10 seconds later
Avatar for TreeofLife
posted about 1 year ago
Have you tried relevant humanities societies if they exist? We have a lot of these in Science, like these:
https://www.rsb.org.uk/get-involved/grants/conference-grant.

Also, your uni may provide via an alumni fund? We can have up £500 each as current post grad students.

Thread: choosing a master degree

posted
01-Jun-18, 13:42
edited about 13 seconds later
Avatar for TreeofLife
posted about 1 year ago
Not in the UK. There might be restrictions on some funding if you are looking for that.

Thread: PhD stipend repayment

posted
31-May-18, 12:45
edited about 3 seconds later
Avatar for TreeofLife
posted about 1 year ago
Quote From iwan:
Im left wondering for my case as well. I wrote in an enquiry to the school regarding this same issue and here is their reply,

''if the student voluntarily withdraws, the student is required to pay the total enoluments up to the total amount received. Unless for special reasons such as health, family, financial etc'

this sounds very vague. and im curious to know how the school will go about chasing the stipend money as stipend is not technically a bond.


If they were serious about it they will just instruct a debt recovery company who will take you to court if you refuse to pay and they believe you can i.e. because they know your employer (they'll do an attachment of earnings and deduct it from your wages), or because they know you have a property (charging order) or because you have expensive stuff they can sell at auction. If you don't have any of these things, then there's not much they can do other than register the default on your credit file.

Thread: The worst day of my life (VIVA horror experience)

posted
31-May-18, 12:33
edited about 29 seconds later
Avatar for TreeofLife
posted about 1 year ago
Sorry you had a horrific experience. I did too. Took me a week to recover but 3 years on I don't even think about it, except to warn people to choose their externals with care! You'll be fine, take some time away from the thesis and then just bang out the corrections.

Thread: Downgrading from PhD to masters

posted
31-May-18, 11:45
Avatar for TreeofLife
posted about 1 year ago
If you're depressed, are you able to make the decision about quitting?

I'm assuming you're not in the UK. In the UK you could downgrade to a MSc providing you had enough data and then write up your work in a thesis.

You should check on your department website or handbook.

Thread: CDT vs PhD project?

posted
31-May-18, 11:43
edited about 26 seconds later
Avatar for TreeofLife
posted about 1 year ago
About the same as you.. there's pros and cons of each so difficult to choose

Thread: PhD stipend repayment

posted
30-May-18, 16:05
edited about 11 seconds later
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posted about 1 year ago
Difficult to answer if you're in Singapore. As Bong said, you wouldn't need to repay in the UK, unless they paid you in advance, and even then I doubt they bother.
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