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conferences are too expensive!
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Quote From rewt:
My uni cut the conference bursary funding due to COVID!


I suspect my university is only offering this bursary because of COVID, as conference travel is now non-existent and admission is either free or much cheaper than an in-person ticket.

conferences are too expensive!
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Quote From Misha_007:
the same I was wondering. I understand they can be expensive where we have to be physically present but what is your take on e-conferences? These are happening due to Covid-19 crisis. Still, people are charging way too much?!?

A lot of the time the charges are a result of the conference organisers having to pay for the appropriate video conferencing license to host as many people as possible. I'm sure there are other charges too which attendees aren't aware of.

My university offers a small pot of funding for conference attendance (for self-funded students), however it comes with two caveats: 1) you can only claim if you are presenting, and 2) you can only claim once per academic year. This is fine if a student only intends to go to a very specific conference and no others, but I've been caught out already by claiming for a cheap conference and then being accepted for a more expensive one!

First APR review
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Everyone usually gets some amendments as a result of their reviews - that's what they're for! As it's your first review, you don't have perspective: this is a good result, and it seems clear to me that your report was good. Don't let the amendments devalue what you've done. You haven't let your supervisor down.

Has anyone met any PhD students who just didn't care?
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Quote From rewt:
I have definitely seen students like that. I am even surprised how many end up getting PhDs. Is it making you depressed that some utter slackers do the absolute bare to scrape past the viva with major revisions while you work hard to both be called Dr? I sat beside someone in my office who somehow managed to "collaborate" her way to a paper and a thesis. Where all she did was ask people for advice or what they thought and wrote it down. I might be exaggerating but I do harbour some resentment but I don't think I have had any bad experiences per se.

Why do you ask? Are you having a bade experience?

I can't get too specific, but I'm currently dealing with a PhD student that I have to interact with on a weekly basis. They aren't a particularly kind person generally (i.e. they directly insult people and then call it 'banter'), and would be someone I'd avoid if interaction wasn't necessary. Myself and other students have said that they feel the need to 'dumb down' what they say in front of this individual so 1) they doesn't copy any ideas and 2) so they don't insult everyone for being 'smarter'. Ironically, this person is also very antisocial, so doesn't admit to needing help, nor seeks it out. In their mind, they are further ahead than they really are, so they don't realise that they are stuck between a rock and a hard place.

Has anyone met any PhD students who just didn't care?
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Whether it's working with them in the lab, or as part of a study group etc., have any of you had bad experiences with another PhD student?

I've personally met a few students who openly admit to only doing a PhD for the title, and just wanted to stay at university to continue their undergraduate lifestyle (i.e. sleeping all day and drinking all night). I doubt most of them will stay the course, especially when it comes to annual reviews.

I've also experienced a fellow PhD student give me and my peers the silent treatment for days, after saying something 'too intelligent' in a meeting and 'showing them up'.

First choice for external examiner declined and second choice is not responding...
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I'm only in my second year, so I haven't approached any potential examiners yet, but I was advised to start asking at least 6 months before my completion date. It could be because my field is reasonably small and therefore I have less choice.

I did not know that it is this lonely
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I agree, PhDs are very different than taught courses as you have no specific cohort, and everyone is doing very different things. COVID has only made PhD isolation worse, as this means that PhD students aren't necessarily in the city where their university is based either.

I make sure to touch base with other PhD students and my non-PhD friends at least twice a week (if not once a day), otherwise I get stuck in my own head.

Doing a PhD with a 2:1 BEng (hons) and a MSc with a Merit
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It depends what else the application asks for. If you are required to include a CV, make sure it's crystal clear and emphasises transferable skills. Otherwise, it's a case of building your profile with relevant courses, knowledge and experience.

Doing a PhD with a 2:1 BEng (hons) and a MSc with a Merit
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Studentships are competitive, so you'll inevitably be up against people with firsts and distinctions in their degrees - therefore, you need to focus on making your personal statement and proposal the best they can possibly be.

Possible to submit corrections many years later?
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Quote From bob86:
The original poster said they had personal circumstances that prevented them from submitting their corrections on time. Granted the work may no longer be novel (which is yet to be determined) but presumably this candidate invested 3/4 years of their life into this endeavour; surely the university can show some compassion and just award the degree given that the requirements (submission of corrections) have now been met? I mean, it’s not like the work wasn’t novel at the time of examination, it was otherwise he/she wouldn’t have passed with minor corrections. Is the university willing to fail this candidate outright and potentially bin 3/4 years of hard work because he/she didn’t meet a superficial deadline? That too on top of the personal difficulties this person may have been facing in the interim. I mean, when you really think about it, it just sounds ridiculous. We all know how demanding undertaking a PhD is, and how flawed the UK PhD system is, I’ve experienced many of it’s difficulties, as have many fellow posters on this forum. It would be refreshing to see institutions start employing some common sense and make the process a lot easier for candidates. I’m not saying to compromise on the quality of the actual research carried out, no, just get rid of some of these archaic, bureaucratic procedures that have plagued the system for many a decade.

I can see your point, but the university would probably say either 1) a line has to be drawn somewhere, and/or 2) if they didn't keep their supervisors in the loop re: their personal circumstances, then they may take a dim view of retrospective claims.

Possible to submit corrections many years later?
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Quote From positivemindset:
I had a successful viva - minor corrections (2014). A number of personal issues came up that meant i was unable to submit my corrections on time.

This is now complete. Would my UK university still accept corrections and award my PhD?

Only they can tell you that. Did you inform your university of your personal issues while they were going on? Did they tell you of any procedures you needed to follow e.g. putting in an extenuating circumstances claim?

Lack of teaching experience
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I'm just coming to the end of Year 1 of my PhD in a humanities subject in the UK. I have enquired about getting teaching experience with my department, but the short answer is: "We don't have enough TA spots to go around; keep a look out of emailed advertisements, but don't hold your breath".

I have noticed that my department seems to prioritise current/former TAs (by not advertising posts and just reoffering them to the PhD students who taught the exact same modules/seminars last year), rather than allowing new students a chance. No PhD students at my university are getting enough teaching hours to qualify to do the PgCertHE, but any experience is better than none.

I am worried about my employability within academia if I have no teaching experience under my belt come completion, so I was wondering if anyone else has been in the same situation, or has advice on what to do? I don't have another university local to me who offers the subject I could teach in, so I can't offer my services elsewhere.

Humanities PhD: Lit review, theoretical framework/methodology
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Your perspective on the literature review is accurate, but I think you're a bit confused about what a theoretical framework is. A theoretical framework is where you place your specific research problem/question within a pre-existing theory in order to create hypotheses, or develop your own theoretical framework from a combination of related theories which becomes the literal framework you use to structure your inquiries.

Can a different phd topic give you renewed enthusiasm
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If they let you change topic, will they still allow you to study for 3 years, or is the year you've done now lost? Also, will changing topic affect your funding situation? Will this also affect your supervisory arrangements? Those are three pretty vital questions, which once answered, should help you make your decision.

Generally, I think people do enjoy their own research project more than pre-proposed ones, but it can depend on the discipline, how complicated you want your project to be etc.

Maybe think about why you're doing a PhD in the first place: if you don't want an academic career, then will it help you in other ways? If it presents more losses than benefits, realistically it might be worth considering leaving.

Printing thesis with colour
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I know this might be a stupid question, but can't you remove the blue line? Or re-colour it into grey/black?

If not, you can sometimes print the thesis yourself and go to a binders after, but you'll need to contact the binders ahead of time to ask 1) if it's possible, and 2) if you need to format the document in a particular way (e.g. put a thicker margin on the left side).