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Teaddict
Wednesday, 19 August 2015 at 7:05pm
Friday, 13 January 2017 at 10:40am
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Thread: Forgetting what you have read

posted
19-Jan-17, 11:49
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posted about 9 months ago
And came to the same conclusions as well! Scary!


Which must surely prove that they were good conclusions.

Thread: Forgetting what you have read

posted
13-Jan-17, 10:42
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posted about 9 months ago
I'm in the same position in that the components of my research each have a small core of about thirty articles, although that does mean I have about 100 core articles...

I have never used software for referencing or source management, so I'm sightly hesitant to start now but I'll have a look.

Thread: Forgetting what you have read

posted
09-Jan-17, 15:12
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posted about 9 months ago
Quote From appleby:
Whenever I read an article, I always write it down (or most of the time, copy and paste items strategically). After scheming the paper to identify which part I want to focus more, first I write down full citation, and then copy and paste the important bits into Notes. Sometimes I copy the whole sentence to avoid losing out the context, sometimes I jot down important chunks of words. Then I do this for several papers under the same theme, and the resulting output is a summarized version of several articles. I save it as pdf and read in my tablet. I never trust myself to remember hundreds of articles. It's kind of like a cheat sheet, so whenever I need to cite them I know exactly from which paper I am referring because everything is written under the article's title headline.


Okay, I think I will go with the cheat sheet idea then. Thanks.

Thread: How blunt should you be with your supervisor?

posted
06-Jan-17, 15:15
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posted about 9 months ago
You should always be blunt and honest with your supervisor. Your supervisor cannot help you if s/he doesn't understand or know about the problems you are having. You should strive to develop an open and honest relationship with your supervisor.

Thread: Forgetting what you have read

posted
04-Jan-17, 11:49
edited about 13 seconds later
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posted about 9 months ago
Not sure if it is a waste of time, but I could turn the papers I read into a single page cheat sheet. Heading, author, main arguments, location of evidence, etc

Thread: Forgetting what you have read

posted
03-Jan-17, 13:45
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posted about 9 months ago
So, here's a conundrum for you and I'm sure we've all been there.

We do reading. We make notes. We underline and highlight. We add some linkages to other work. We then do this for other articles and books. Months later we come back to this article and completely forget what is in it, what it's about, and much of the content.

How do you avoid this?

Thread: Learning new methods that your supervisors aren't familiar with

posted
23-Dec-16, 13:09
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posted about 10 months ago
What methodology is it?

Thread: Learning new methods that your supervisors aren't familiar with

posted
23-Dec-16, 08:57
edited about 7 seconds later
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posted about 10 months ago
I'm in a similar boat. No one in my department really knows the methodology I'm using, although my supervisor has a superficial understanding. I'm going to a summer school, two week intensive course, to learn.

Thread: Your method of accessing research once read

posted
01-Dec-16, 21:09
edited about 16 seconds later
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posted about 10 months ago
So here is a question for you guys.

You are writing a section of your PhD. You have read about forty or fifty articles that directly relate to that section and that you wish to reference in that section. How do you keep a track of it all?

Do you write condescended half page cheat cheats, memorise everything, leave post-it notes everywhere? How do you keep track of everything you have read so you don't forget to include articles and data?

Thread: First 4 months PhD(bioscience)

posted
30-Nov-16, 21:39
edited about 28 seconds later
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posted about 11 months ago
This isn't necessarily a problem. I'm a first year PhD student and have been told relatedly to not worry about the first several months as much. From what I gather, PhD students think they can start working a master piece in month two and it just doesn't work like that. I'm currently teaching, doing an MA in teaching, and my PhD. Naturally, I'm a little busy and told that it's normal to not really get started until several months in.

Thread: Knowledge gap issues - stats

posted
30-Oct-16, 22:01
edited about 23 seconds later
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posted about 12 months ago
Find a summer school that specialises in that methodological approach. No one in my department really understands my methodology (except my supervisor who has a familiarity with it) so I will be attending a summer school to brush up my skills.

Thread: my supervisor gave my project to another student

posted
20-Oct-16, 16:29
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posted about 1 year ago
Quote From Dunham:

Great Scientists but there English is just bad



:)

Thread: Can I please ask what you did within the first 6 months of your PhD? What did you achieve? Hours?etc

posted
15-Oct-16, 09:36
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posted about 1 year ago
Hey Maria,

While I am still within my first year, I thought sharing my experience thus far, and my plan for the coming months might help.

I am doing a full-time PhD, alongside an MA in teaching in higher education, which is compulsory at my University. I am also taking two second year undergraduate classes this semester.

As you can expect, therefore, most of my time is dedicated to completing the MA and to teaching. Alongside this, however, I am merely scoping out data sources and cases for my research.

I won't start on the literature review until nearer the time when I am required to submit a document for progression. As I have done similar things in my undergraduate and masters dissertations, I am quite familiar with the literature already.

Thread: Imposter Syndrome and Expertise

posted
24-Sep-16, 18:38
edited about 3 seconds later
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posted about 1 year ago
All the funded PhD students in my department are, to my knowledge, GTAs and therefore have responsibilities for teaching.

Thread: Imposter Syndrome and Expertise

posted
24-Sep-16, 12:09
edited about 1 minute later
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posted about 1 year ago
Thanks for the comment guys. My University makes teacher training compulsory, either in your first or second year. I have opted to do it in my first year. You don't receive the training before you teach, however, they are back to back. So you are taught while you are teaching.

I know the content relatively well - and contributed towards the reading list for this module when it was set up. My concern is that I won't be an adequate teacher and my students will suffer as a result. As with blocksof, I had a PhD teaching me during my masters, and as a result, almost failed a module. Suffice it to say, I wouldn't want to inflict that on anyone else.
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