Overview of Jamie_Wizard

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Jamie_Wizard
Tuesday, 17 October 2017 at 4:13pm
Thursday, 6 February 2020 at 2:46pm
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page 1 of 6 recent posts

Thread: Have you seen anyone who got a postdoc job without a first-authored paper?

posted
06-Feb-20, 14:46
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posted about 1 month ago
Congratulations Sciencegirl!

Thread: Has anyone moved from being based in their University to being based at home (UK address?)

posted
29-Jan-20, 10:55
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posted about 2 months ago
I don't see why it shouldn't be a problem given the computational nature of your PhD. Also, given you're approaching the end of your PhD and the write-up stage, now would be the time to wind up and do less teaching so as to focus on finishing. My PhD supervisor actually loved to Skype, though we normally tried to meet in person once a week. In your case Skype and meeting in person once or twice a month sounds perfectly reasonable.

Thread: Have you seen anyone who got a postdoc job without a first-authored paper?

posted
24-Jan-20, 11:21
edited about 43 seconds later
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posted about 2 months ago
pm133, didn't mean to offend. I've seen load of your posts where you offer good advice. I did, however, notice some bias in a few - to paraphrase your opinion "Oh yeah, I know loads of dumb people who've got into those top 'RG' universities, they were nothing special. The whole prestigious university thing is bullshit. Just my opinion of course!" In my view that's not particularly helpful. Just my view of course ;-)

Thread: doubts about applying for a phd, any chemistry phd students here?

posted
24-Jan-20, 11:15
edited about 15 seconds later
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posted about 2 months ago
2.1 should be fine, go for it!

The only way in which the classification is likely to affect you is in comparison to other applicants - the application process has to be fair in recognising academic grades when releasing funding for scholarships. So this will be more of an issue for very highly sought-after scholarships.

Thread: Have you seen anyone who got a postdoc job without a first-authored paper?

posted
24-Jan-20, 11:13
edited about 3 seconds later
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posted about 2 months ago
I was also approached for a post-doc with a famous Russian professor in the UK in a specialist field - Machine Learning. He and his colleagues made some pioneering contributions that transformed the field (they invented conformal prediction in ML). In my case, towards the end of my PhD, which was going really well, I wasn't very proactive in searching for the next position until the last moment, rather focusing on getting it all completed and finishing my publications. The downside to this was that I heard of others having organised their post-docs and jobs before they completed and I felt I'd left it a bit until the last minute.

Although I achieved 3 full papers and presented at 5 conferences before I finished, I wasn't as proactive and as enterprising in creating collaborations as Tudor Queen.

That said, the professor I mentioned ran a seminar for staff and post-graduate students where he invited his previous PhD students who ended up working in companies such as Microsoft, Google and Facebook . Our department was small and everyone had an idea of what area others were working on. I sometimes attended the seminars, and there were drinks afterwards where he got to ask me more about my work - in particular he was interested in my background in Chemistry and my PhD in distributed computing.

As I was submitting, I was approached by the professor who encouraged me to apply for his post-doc position in Machine Learning for Drug discovery. I interviewed for it and got the position.

I'm currently working in a consulting role in a medical research institute, but now I'm leaving there now to start a post-doc in Imperial college.

Thread: Have you seen anyone who got a postdoc job without a first-authored paper?

posted
22-Jan-20, 23:51
edited about 4 minutes later
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posted about 2 months ago
Quote From pm133:
There is also another factor where tons of students pursue perceived reputation first and foremost and the science is very much a secondary consideration. I wouldn't even want to guess how many applications arrive on the desk of a Nobel prize winner or a very well known researcher at Oxford, Cambridge or one of the Ivy League unis.


But achieving a Nobel prize means the science is good - it's outstanding and absolutely NOT secondary! I sense a whiff of the Fox and Sour grapes in what you're preaching pm133, and I've called it out before. [no offence intended]

For those that don't know it, story goes that the fox tries to eat grapes from a vine but cannot reach them. Rather than admit defeat, he states they are undesirable. The expression "sour grapes" originated from this fable.

The following list speaks for itself:

Thread: Have you seen anyone who got a postdoc job without a first-authored paper?

posted
17-Jan-20, 14:39
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posted about 2 months ago
As for aiming for a prestigious institution (Russell group or others) for post-doc, you'll usually need to demonstrate that you're at the top of your game, and more importantly, have something significant to contribute to that research group. One doesn't necessarily need to go to such a prestigious institution to do good quality, impactful research. That said, it is usually the most impactful research that is carried out at these institutions.

All the best,
Jamie

Thread: Have you seen anyone who got a postdoc job without a first-authored paper?

posted
17-Jan-20, 14:39
Avatar for Jamie_Wizard
posted about 2 months ago
Hi there,

It's good that you're ambitious but I think you need to align your attitude with your goals, because when you say "currently I don't have any first-authored papers, and my supervisor isn't planning on making me write one.", it appears as if you think it's your supervisors PhD and career, especially when you use the phrase "making me write one".

I read your later reply about your supervisor using parts of your data for other peoples papers. A good supervisor should be able to balance their own research goals with keeping plan to guide the PhD student to develop and have enough peer-reviewed material for their PhD and viva. When this doesn't happen, the PhD student/candidate should ensure the supervisor is reminded of this and is not jeopardising their PhD. I think your supervisor has let you down in this regard, but then I also think you have let yourself down for not challenging this and standing up for your PhD -- believe me, unless you have very easy-going examiners, you'll need to stand up for your PhD in the viva!

After the first year(s) up until the upgrade to PhD-proper (usually 1-2 years) and when one becomes a PhD candidate, really it doesn't make sense to not take full responsibility for your own development and publishing, even if that appears daunting. Ideally, PhD candidates would have gotten a feel and developed a bit of confidence in their first 1-2 years submitting to and presenting at conferences, and submitting papers (even if they are reject or have significant amendments) - it's part of the learning and development process.

By the sounds of it, you've been fortunate with your experiments and results - as you know, in the sciences experiments can go wrong - your supervisor is making use of those results to compliment others work. I think you need to be more proactive, especially now that you're approaching the end.

Thread: Anyone here use Linux?

posted
10-Jan-20, 22:46
edited about 11 seconds later
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posted about 2 months ago
...I mean trees just dumped in the street do nothing to spruce up the area.

Thread: Anyone here use Linux?

posted
10-Jan-20, 22:44
edited about 3 seconds later
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posted about 2 months ago
Haha, thanks Tudor. Yeah, I am totally with you on working in softer ambient light.

We may have missed the local councils Tree collection :-)

Thread: Anyone here use Linux?

posted
09-Jan-20, 14:05
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posted about 2 months ago
Quote From Tudor_Queen:
Computing aside Jamie_Wizard, you still have your Christmas tree up!!!! This is shocking!!!! We're practically mid January now!!!


Hahaha the photo was from the other day, but I didn't get a chance to actually post the reply!! That said, I was always told it was the 6th to get rid of the tree, and feel a bit weird for still having the tree. Just been too busy to take it down (having to pack everything away), lol

Thread: Anyone here use Linux?

posted
09-Jan-20, 13:44
edited about 17 seconds later
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posted about 2 months ago
So, to sum up. I absolutely love Linux (it's necessary for my research and computation work), but I hate it for Microsoft Office (it can be run using Wine) or LibreOffice. It's OK for Latex editing in Texmaker, but prefer Mac or Windows for that. It's alright for viewing PDFs, but again my mac/windows laptops are just nicer for this.

Thread: Anyone here use Linux?

posted
09-Jan-20, 13:38
edited about 3 minutes later
Avatar for Jamie_Wizard
posted about 2 months ago
Eng, that's the funniest operating system analogy I've heard, it made me laugh out loud!

Tudor, you're most welcome.

Nead, VMs (virtual machines) are a useful tool, especially when running them to provide compatibility for software or servers (although this is being superseded by the containerisation tools such as Docker and Singularity). They are, however, often quite slow when it comes to graphical user interfaces, also requiring a lot of RAM and CPU resources.

This is my cluster, now in my living room. They each run Ubuntu 16.04-LTS, have 6 cores (12 hyperthreaded cores), and 32GB RAM each. But the badass part is I managed to get it working with Infiniband and I'm getting ~8 Gbit/sec (8x faster bandwidth than Gigabit ethernet)...Computation is done with Openlava (Opensource IBM LSF) and Apache Spark (Hadoop platform).

I usually use it via my MacBook Air, my desk (on the left), or sometimes via my windows laptop.

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Thread: Anyone here use Linux?

posted
04-Jan-20, 14:03
edited about 2 minutes later
Avatar for Jamie_Wizard
posted about 2 months ago
Quote From Tudor_Queen:
A final consideration - I'm considering Lenovo, Dell, or HP (and in that order) in case that is relevant to this question.


They should all work. When I ordered my Dell Worksation, I was able to choose to have it pre-installed with Ubuntu. Installation would never pose a problem for me (as I maintain Linux servers), but I was pleasantly surprised at this. So, perhaps you could order directly from Dell. Alternatively, you can download Ubuntu 18 - make sure you go for the LTS version (Long Term Support), which means it's supported for many years to come. That way you could pick up a cheaper laptop from Curry's/ PC World and then install it yourself, electing to wipe windows. In my experience, Dual boot, where Ubuntu offers to install alongside windows, is quite unreliable. If something goes wrong, you'll need a technical person to help fix it and may not be able to access your Windows installation even if it's present. So I'd avoid using that option, and install Ubuntu as the sole operating system.

Best wishes,
Jamie

Thread: Anyone here use Linux?

posted
04-Jan-20, 14:02
edited about 23 seconds later
Avatar for Jamie_Wizard
posted about 2 months ago
Quote From Tudor_Queen:
Beyond that I guess I mainly use my laptop for: doing stats on SPSS and R, using a few bits of open/free software specific to my field (such as CLAN which is part of the CHILDES project - which I've just checked to see that it has a "Unix" version available to download - I am hoping this means it would be compatible with Linux), Skype, viewing photos, and, importantly, reading lots of PDFs (currently I use Adobe to do this). Would I be able to transition to Linux fairly easily and do these things with the same ease as in Windows?


I'm not familiar with CLAN or CHILDES, but on quick inspection of their website, it appears their "UNIX" version (actually Unix is pretty dead, and Linux has taken over - so I guess they are referring to Linux) only supports command-line (i.e. you run the program by typing in commands) and doesn't have a visual interface. This should be straightforward for you to pick up.

Quote From Tudor_Queen:
A second question relates to installation. I will probably buy a new laptop soon with Windows 10 preinstalled. Do I need to look out for any particular specifications, or will I be able to download Linux on pretty much any modern run-of-the-mill laptop?


Linux will work on pretty much most machines and will do the best job of making use of resources optimally. However, a potential issue could be support for Graphics chipset (the graphics circuitry on the machine). Specifically, finding driver software to get the most out of some graphics cards could mean having to go to the effort of installing propriety drivers (instead of using existing ones). If the graphics chipset is common, then this is less likely to be an issue.
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