Overview of kenziebob

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kenziebob
Friday, 24 November 2017 at 1:06am
Tuesday, 12 June 2018 at 12:28pm
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Thread: Editing or new document

posted
12-Jun-18, 10:02
edited about 11 seconds later
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posted about 6 days ago
I normally print out a copy of the writing with comments included, then have two word documents open: the one with their comments included and a new blank page. I work in sections, copy and pasting from the old document to the blank page, and I have only had an issue with references once. Mendeley seems to transfer them across :)

I then use the paper copy of the document to follow their comments, working on the blank page document.

Works for me, even if it does sound a bit complicated!

Thread: Motivational thread

posted
30-May-18, 20:19
edited about 21 seconds later
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posted about 2 weeks ago
Yay what a great thread. I'm in the process of drafting my first year report/transition report/upgrade report, definitely need motivating!

Thread: When to start writing thesis

posted
09-May-18, 11:23
edited about 7 seconds later
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posted about 1 month ago
Hi Jane,

I started around the same time as you, and I've just sent off the first draft of my probation/upgrade/transfer report. That's it - I haven't started on the actual thesis yet at all!

The way that we worked is similar to what others have described - during every supervision meeting my supervisors would suggest a topic for writing and I'd go away and write 1000-2000 words on the topic, and bring it to the next supervision and so on. I think it's a good idea to break writing up into chunks :)

And about being overwhelmed with a PhD - I am definitely feeling that too. I feel like with every jump forward there is a step back, and I need to keep remembering that I can't jump to the end - there's a lot of small steps in there before I finish!

Thread: Demanding critical and controlling PhD advisor - I need Help

posted
01-May-18, 13:20
edited about 16 seconds later
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posted about 1 month ago
Hi there applepie,

Is there anyone you can talk to in the department? At my Uni there is an academic who is responsible for ensuring that all of the postgrads are ok/ an assigned person other than our supervisor that we can talk to. If there is anyone like that at yours I would talk to them.

Is it at all possible that this is just how she comes across over emails? Just playing doubles advocate here - I recently had a situation wherein I reacted emotionally to what seemed like quite a contrite email, when it turns out it was just how the person writes online. I'm not saying this is what your supervisor is doing though, especially if others have said the same thing.

Thread: Any reformed night owls that have become larks?

posted
01-May-18, 08:08
Avatar for kenziebob
posted about 1 month ago
Hi veeman,

I am. My roommate knows that I seem to really "wake up" at around 10pm, and I can quite happily stay up until 2 or 3am. I love that feeling of knowing that most other people are asleep - as an introvert it is very freeing for me.

Luckily my PhD is quite flexible in terms of timings, but I do tend to set an 'emergency' alarm for about 10 or 11am, just so that I don't sleep the day away. Apart from that I wake up naturally - but it is very easy for me to stay asleep until 4pm if I don't have that alarm.

Thread: Dissappointing my superviser and how to deal with that

posted
23-Apr-18, 13:15
Avatar for kenziebob
posted about 2 months ago
Hi,

I have been there, both in a job and for a time in my PhD. It is very easy to feel this way, but often people don't realise how far they are progressing until other people point it out to them. The most important thing is that you recognise where you are at the moment; do you know what you have to do to keep progressing? Have your supervisors spoken to you/or you them about this? As a former teacher, the important thing to me was that my students knew where they were and what they had to do to improve further - I can't imagine this is much different with a supervisor :)

Thread: Please help with the choice of the thesis topic on Culture/Expats

posted
23-Apr-18, 13:09
edited about 1 second later
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posted about 2 months ago
Go away and think about it - find a gap. What makes you passionate about this topic? Have people covered this? If so, can you approach it from a different angle?

That or ask Mr. Google. Either way.

Thread: How to deal with fellow PhD students

posted
20-Apr-18, 14:41
edited about 23 seconds later
Avatar for kenziebob
posted about 2 months ago
Thank you for the replies all - it's been really hard, but luckily at the end of the day as long as my relationships with my colleagues are 'functional' as you suggest, I think I will be alright. I have sent a blanket email to the students explaining my rationale, calmly asking for preferred slots, and luckily a few people have sent me pleasant responses. I aim to go in on Monday and act normally, and hopefully we can carry on being at least civil colleagues.

I also try my best not to be too 'out there' with how great my PhD is going - but maybe I have come across in this way to someone. It's always possible, especially as I have a positive working relationship with my supervisors (and I know many don't).

Enjoy the weekend everyone :)

Thread: How to deal with fellow PhD students

posted
20-Apr-18, 09:35
edited about 28 seconds later
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posted about 2 months ago
Hi both.

We have seminars twice a week, and the students are responsible for one, and the academics the other. The student who was doing it has left, and asked me if I'd like to take on the job. For some reason I decided to say yes.

I agree with what you both said - really, I need to remember that it is the PhD that is most important, and as I am the only one in my department in the field that I am in, none of my research relies on anybody else. I have my own friends outside of Uni, my supervisors are very happy with me and I'm happy apart from this one issue. To be honest I know a lot of people who find their PhD very stressful, and I know I'm lucky to be ahead of schedule.

Tru I might take your suggestion and bake something for the office, perhaps some peace-keeping brownies :)

Thread: How to deal with fellow PhD students

posted
19-Apr-18, 22:34
edited about 26 seconds later
Avatar for kenziebob
posted about 2 months ago
Hi all,

I've been having an issue for a little while now in my PhD. Work-wise, everything is great. I am way ahead of my supervisors' initial timetable and they are really happy with me and my progress. We have ethics in, three studies planned and my upgrade report is pretty much done. I've been doing other odd jobs around the department, such as organising our weekly seminars. I work from my shared office for two or three days a week and spend the rest of the time working from home.

The problem is that I am struggling to get along with most of my fellow PhD students. They have complained about the way I am running these seminars, but I pointed out that I have had next to no help with this, and upon asking for a list of the PhD students (we all need to speak) nobody could give me one. I had to arrange the seminars for the next few months just by asking for names of people who haven't spoken for a while, which has angered one or two people as they think I've been unfair. Added to this, my own name is not on the list - my primary supervisor has to be at my first year presentation to sign it off, and she doesn't work on Mondays. So I am arranging to do my presentation/talk on a different day, but apparently this is 'not an excuse'.

I've never found it easy to make friends, and I know I was the odd one out before this mess happened. I don't find it easy to talk to people, jokes often go right over my head and I struggle to know what to say. I have one good friend in the department, but apart from that I don't really spend much time with the others, who are all very close.

I just feel like this has been a failure on my part, and I'm not sure how to feel better about my relationship with my colleagues.

Thread: Doing an advertised PhD topic at a different university

posted
28-Mar-18, 01:42
edited about 3 seconds later
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posted about 3 months ago
I'm not sure about copyright but I'm really not sure how that would sit ethically. Can you not apply to the one there, say you are very interested but cannot relocate? Some PhD students in my department work from home and only travel in if needed for seminars and meetings, however this is different for lab-based PhDs of course.

Thread: 40+ and looking for Phd. Would appreciate your advise.

posted
28-Mar-18, 01:39
Avatar for kenziebob
posted about 3 months ago
Quote From anonymous1977:
Quote From kenziebob:
Quote From anonymous1977:
Doing a PhD with the sole aim of getting an academic job is a very poor reason in my opinion. The chances of securing a permanent job are so small that you really need a good solid backup plan.

The above made me think that you meant what I referred to. If that's not the case it's fine. Can someone help me on my original question?


I think what pm meant is that there is a lot of competition for being a university lecturer permanently. Just something to think about before you embark on 3+ years of work.

Anyway. If it helps at all I know that a lot of British and American universities are branching out in Dubai and Abu Dhabi, and that is definitely a lot closer to India :)


Thank you. Does this mean it may not be prudent to embark on a PhD if my only goal is to research and teach at a University level?


All it means is that you need to consider what you will do if it doesn't happen - if you don't get a permanent lecturing post anywhere. Will your PhD be useless? Or is there something else you could take from it?

I have no idea what I'll do at the end of my PhD - I don't really have the option of working in industry and I'd need a clinical doctorate to practise. It's something I think a lot about but mainly passion for my subject sees it through. To make the long hours/work/effort of a PhD worth it, there has to be something else I think.

Thread: 40+ and looking for Phd. Would appreciate your advise.

posted
26-Mar-18, 14:53
Avatar for kenziebob
posted about 3 months ago
Quote From anonymous1977:
Doing a PhD with the sole aim of getting an academic job is a very poor reason in my opinion. The chances of securing a permanent job are so small that you really need a good solid backup plan.

The above made me think that you meant what I referred to. If that's not the case it's fine. Can someone help me on my original question?


I think what pm meant is that there is a lot of competition for being a university lecturer permanently. Just something to think about before you embark on 3+ years of work.

Anyway. If it helps at all I know that a lot of British and American universities are branching out in Dubai and Abu Dhabi, and that is definitely a lot closer to India :)

Thread: Funded Phd at low-rank uni or a masters at a top uni

posted
26-Mar-18, 13:45
edited about 42 seconds later
Avatar for kenziebob
posted about 3 months ago
Quote From pm133:
Quote From bongmaster5000:


Dont mess around worrying about the so-called ranking of universities. Companies worth working for dont care where you studied.
What matters is what you achieve during your phd, your relationship with your supervisor and that your university has the resources you need to succeed - computational in your case I think. Leave all the worrying about university rankings to schoolchildren and parents who dont know any better and are dazzled by such nonsense as league tables.


Couldn't agree more. Take the PhD. Rankings at PhD level are even more meaningless than usual. Plus, to coin a phrase, a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.


It really is incredible how many people buy into this league table rubbish. I keep hearing from people who talk about being at a Russell Group uni as though their presence there has somehow impregnated them with special magical powers. I never know whether to laugh or cry at this.

I think the way to break this problem might be to do something as drastic as ensuring there is a common curriculum and a common set of exams across all universities in the UK. When you are charging students just under £10k a year, there needs to be some meaningful way for them to know what they are buying. Right now the current system encourages and rewards corruption and bullshitting.


Agreed. Some of the teenagers in my family are looking at Unis, and every one I have suggested (as it is near a support network/family, or a really nice place or I've heard very good things about a department) they have shut down immediately as "it's not RGroup and I won't get hired at the end!"

I went to an ex-poly for my undergrad and I still managed to get a funded PhD in a very well respected department.

Thread: Brand New PhD Student & Feeling Hopeless

posted
26-Mar-18, 08:49
edited about 8 seconds later
Avatar for kenziebob
posted about 3 months ago
Hi Lisa,

Don't panic. I had a similar experience at the beginning of my PhD - one of my SPs said that I need to be more independent and "take a more active" role in discussions.

I assume you are reading at the moment to figure out your research question? All they mean (I think) is that if you find something that looks really interesting or relevant then you should send across a short email just saying "i found this interesting because X"....
nothing too complicated, just a sentence :)

I found this really hard at first. I think its just that they want proactive students rather than student students if that makes any sense at all (it's first thing on a Monday morning!), students who take more of a lead in their learning as, after all, it is YOUR PhD :) This should grow as your confidence in dealing with them grows, but I would be very surprised if most PhD students haven't had at least one experience like this.

A big part of it is not really thinking about whether something sounds stupid or not. If you have an idea you think is good, put it to them. The worst they can do is disagree or argue a different point of view. I learned not to worry about appearing to be stupid - getting questions and ideas out in the early part of my PhD was a learning experience as they picked up on quite a few misconceptions, etc.

Here's a brill article that I love that does a much better job of detailing the importance of "stupidity":

I hope some of this made some sense - I haven't even had a cup of tea yet. Just wanted to let you know that you are definitely not the only PhD student to have had this kind of thing happen.
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