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Socialpolitik
Tuesday, 21 January 2014 at 2:49am
Monday, 16 March 2015 at 3:04am
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Thread: Anyone with two PhDs?

posted
16-Mar-15, 03:07
edited about 2 minutes later
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posted about 5 years ago
Dr Venkman in the Ghostbusters has two PhDs: one in psychology and one in parapsychology. His colleague Dr Stantz, upon being thrown out of the faculty with Venkman, laments that Venkman has never left college he doesn't understand what it's like on the outside, whereas he has "worked in the private sector - they expect results!"

Thread: Choosing Between Two Offers - What to Focus On?

posted
03-Mar-15, 02:04
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posted about 5 years ago
This is a difficult one. Personally, I think I would go with the more interesting subject. This is something you will be studying for at least three years. Given that you say there isn't too much difference in supervision then it seems that's the best option. Also, as a researcher you are your own person and can make contacts for yourself. A good supervisor is very useful but isn't the only way to a job in academia.

Thread: The ex-poly curse

posted
20-Feb-15, 15:09
edited a moment later
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posted about 5 years ago
Congratulations! That's great news and an inspiring story for others who maybe worried an ex-poly on their application would hold them back. UCL is one of the best universities in the world!

Thread: The ex-poly curse

posted
17-Feb-15, 03:23
edited about 5 minutes later
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posted about 5 years ago
Hi Cloudofash

Sorry to hear about your struggles to obtain funding. I am in a Russell group university in the social sciences and I know people from less 'prestigious' universities who have PhD funding, so I know that it's certainly not a barrier to funding. The thing about Oxbridge and the like is that's its not primarily the preserve of the affluent but also the very academically bright who go there. If they are receiving a similar level of prep from their tutors it is possible they are getting advice and references from world leaders in your field. It might be on merit they are getting funded, not on the name of their Uni alone. Going forward I would focus on just how competitive it is to get a funded place and make sure you do everything you possibly can to make yourself a strong candidate. People have mentioned master's degrees already and I know personally that I would not have been able to get PhD funding after my undergraduate degree as I simply wasn't ready. You won't come up against Oxbridge candidates every time and even if you do, a postgraduate qualification might make you shine. Ultimately supervisors want someone they can work with and have confidence in. They're not necessarily flattered by Oxbridge.

Thread: PhD's: worth the risk based on a dream of academia?

posted
08-Feb-15, 22:02
edited about 4 seconds later
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posted about 5 years ago
Some great points already made here. Just want to reiterate what others have said about funding but also add what my back up plan was if I was unsuccessful with my bid for funding.

I am an ex teacher like yourself and have worked in various roles in schools. I am doing a PhD in social policy, I was fortunate to get ESRC funding. I made a decision that I was going to pursue a PhD whether I was successful in winning funding or not. If I was unsuccessful I had a plan to do a PhD part-time self funded but to do it a different area. My back up plan was to do a part-time education PhD whilst working in education. I would therefore see it as a fairly expensive hobby but also one that could have potentially enhanced my career in education later down the line.

The reason I really wanted to do a PhD was stay to engaged in academic debates, intellectual stimulation and also the feeling of accomplishment I've always had in education (bachelors and 2 masters degrees). If this resonates with you then maybe it's worth pursuing and viewing it as a hobby but one that may enhance your career. There are downsides to a part-time PhD but if you're self funding I think it's the best way to avoid the huge costs of study in loss of earnings...

Thread: Funding for second PhD attempt?

posted
03-Feb-15, 01:43
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posted about 5 years ago
Hi thedrop

I know from my ESRC funded interview PhD that despite being 30 at the time, they didn't really ask my about CV at all. I can't remember though, if submitting one was part of the application or not. So if you're not asked to submit a CV and not directly asked about your previous experience then you might be ok just to refrain from mentioning your past PhD. If there's an interview or an application process it may just entirely be centred around your academic qualifications and more importantly, your research proposal and how it fits with the department research interests. I wouldn't tell a direct lie but it's still worth pursuing an ESRC application. The ESRC administration is largely devolved down to institutions now in their DTC system so some of the process might vary from institution to institution. I know some interview and some don't. If you're serious about obtaining funding you should be applying to numerous institutions anyway. Finally, on the reference, it's not like a job application where they want a reference from your last employer and want to account for gaps in your CV so your Master's references should be fine.

Thread: Do I need to have an ontological and epistemological position for my study?

posted
28-Nov-14, 00:45
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posted about 6 years ago
Yes. The fact you are doing an interview based study already implies you have an epistemological stance.
Ontology: what exists in the world?
Epistemology: How do you know it exists?

Thread: Getting into a masters degree 2:1 with a 2:2

posted
15-Jul-14, 00:17
edited about 35 seconds later
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posted about 6 years ago
Hi,

I disagree, I think work experience can help you overcome the barrier that you don't quite have the grade requirements. In my experience universities are more flexible with entry onto postgraduate courses and assess applications on their merits. It is a key source of funding for universities and so if they can justify giving someone a place they will do. Focus on the positives in your application and convince them you have lots to offer. Good luck.

Thread: Query on Job Interview Outcome

posted
15-Feb-14, 00:20
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posted about 6 years ago
Hey, congratulations

It sounds to me like they're just being cautious since you've been a student for so long and so don't want to commit to a permanent contract at this moment in time. It might be that in 9 months after assessing how you manage back in the working world that they make it permanent.

Thread: What to wear to a PhD interview (male)?

posted
25-Jan-14, 02:32
edited about 23 seconds later
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posted about 6 years ago
I wore a suit to mine. I think it shows you're taking the interview seriously and also gives you an air of authority when presenting etc. Much better to be over dressed than under dressed

Thread: Phd with 2:2 first degree plus Masters?

posted
21-Jan-14, 02:54
edited about 11 seconds later
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posted about 6 years ago
Hi,

I got a 2.2 at undergrad and received ESRC funding at a Russell Group University. I did get a distinction in my MA though. I think with a very good proposal it wouldn't be impossible for you to receive funding. However, as you are willing to self fund then I think provided there's no major problems with your proposal then your grades won't hold you back. I would read some more on here though about the implications for self funding students. It's a big decision.
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