Overview of Nad75

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Nad75
Tuesday, 20 September 2016 at 2:37am
Wednesday, 19 September 2018 at 5:11pm
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Thread: Feeling incompetent to analyze qualitative data

posted
19-Sep-18, 17:16
edited about 14 seconds later
by Nad75
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posted about 1 month ago
I also do it by hand, emmaki...and so does my supervisor!

I do qualitative discourse analysis, mainly focused on thematic and narrative. The important thing to remember is that it works with "grounded" methods, where a worldview is seen as coming from the discourse/narratives, and making sure you aren't applying a normative lens on something that is supposed to reveal the worldview of the individual utterer.

I know how you feel about the fear of being seen as "overanalysing", but don't worry, I don't think there is a way to overanalyse with qualitative. My last chapter/paper had 4 pages of analysis from just 3 lines of text, which at first seemed over-analysing but I was told it was the best set yet.

Thread: RA roles

posted
30-Aug-18, 10:48
edited about 1 minute later
by Nad75
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posted about 2 months ago
Yes, in my experience this regards possible extension based on the quality of the output which determines further funding. If you produce what was required and in good quality (also showing there needs to be further work done with__), then they can argue that it is very beneficial to extend the RA funding for ___ more months, with the same pay and hours.

I was informed a decision to extend about 3 weeks before the first instance funding was scheduled to end, so you should have enough time to begin job hunting in case the funds aren't there for extension.

Thread: Conference abstract - different results/changes

posted
25-Aug-18, 13:05
edited about 3 seconds later
by Nad75
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posted about 2 months ago
Quote From rewt:
Who reads conference abstracts .


This, lol, describes the majority of attendees. No worries, Tudor, as most people choose the panel of the theme they're interested in and don't bother reading the abstracts, they'll just be familiar with your name/title/association. Most don't even bother reading the paper that some organisations make you put up. But PM's advice is good, I've done that as well, just a brief sentence. The abstracts may be archived online for a bit, but nobody will every go back and read it.

Put an updated one on your academia page if you want and that is what will stick with recruiters when/if they look up your presentation experience. (Although, I personally don't put the presentation papers or abstracts up on academia unless they are enroute for publishing)

Thread: Where to do my PhD Studies?

posted
17-Aug-18, 09:38
by Nad75
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posted about 2 months ago
From personal experience, it would be best to avoid China if you could, if your expected career will be outside of the region. (Although the Unis in the mainland and HK rarely hire their own, as a foreign degree carries more capital to attract students.) I know many who graduated from University of Hong Kong with thesis awards, glowing letters of recommendation and publications that exceed what is expected of entry-level in US & UK, however employers are hesitant at the quality of the degree. Rejected at every place, even for part-time hours. And this is for Hong Kong, which passes the world rankings for mainland universities. Academic scholarship is also tightly controlled in China, I think Cambridge University Publishers got pulled out once, as well as blackouts for some journals. This would greatly restrict your freedom of research and writing. This has happened in Universities in the mainland that have strong links to the UK unis, but unfortunately must play by the rules of Beijing. So, there are several long-term factors that may help you in your decision.

Thread: To present or not present (almost the same conference presentation)

posted
14-Aug-18, 12:28
by Nad75
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posted about 2 months ago
Quote From rewt:
Make them ever so different and you will be fine. Like, talk more about the methodology in one conference and the other talk more about the implications.

There are people who keep presenting the exact same work for a few years because that is all they have. No one will call you out for it, so don't worry.


So true, I've seen seasoned academics regurgitate the same paper at different conferences, so you're fine. Usually the conference has a theme, so if you can slightly tailor it (like rewt suggested, at the implications or highlight the methods) to match it'll be more impactful.

If the conferences ask to publish the papers however, you need to choose just one, of course.

Thread: Unsure about career prospects after finishing PhD this year

posted
13-Aug-18, 12:37
edited about 28 seconds later
by Nad75
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posted about 2 months ago
The actual skills learned during the PhD process outweigh the skills of a fresh grad. Don't forget that the completion of the PhD is evidence of project management, the ability to produce an output within a deadline (assuming it didn't take you longer than the expected PhD time!). Conference organisation is evidence of delegation skills, networking. Conference presentations are evidence of having confident presentation skills and the ability to tailor knowledge to a varied audience (great if they are looking for a bit of PR.) Any committees that you served on work as evidence of team-work.

I am creating two resumes, one academic and one for the industry, and job hunting for both sectors in a month or so. This is a great resource for creating a CV tailored for the industry that showcases how to write an effective CV if you have a PhD and want to highlight what you have to fit the criteria:

https://www.state.gov/documents/organization/234524.pdf

Thread: Disclosing you are an international scholar during postdoc interview

posted
17-Jul-18, 17:55
by Nad75
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posted about 3 months ago
If you don't need the university to sponsor you, than I think it's not an issue. I would follow the advice of your advisor.

Thread: Enough data for a PhD?

posted
17-Jul-18, 17:46
edited about 12 seconds later
by Nad75
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posted about 3 months ago
Quote From MissyL:
Some of us really struggle with the PhD process and aren't capable of writing papers solely on our own. Get off your high horse.


PM133 and I don't always agree but this behaviour is uncalled for. S/he is offering valuable advice, as the thesis is about 'publishable quality papers' and having that extra bit of real publishing makes it a bit more water-tight. Reputable journals should be double-blind peer-reviewed, so don't worry about getting embarrassed if you get a rejection, and critique from the reviewers and editors will defiantly strengthen the thesis and viva. It's not a high horse position, it is realistic and constructive advice.

For your question:
From the point of the examiners, what's the best thing to do, keep my three small chapters of interesting results with good controls etc, or add some of my non interesting/ possibly bad experimental design results in order to bulk things out ??

I think the former is better (a nice set of results with good controls), but what does your supervisor advise?

Thread: Dropping out of PhD - what's next?

posted
03-Jul-18, 10:41
by Nad75
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posted about 3 months ago
"Currently, I'm coming into uni 6-7 days a week"

First off, don't do that. Make sure you schedule in dedicated 2 'no work' days where you plan a movie, go hiking, window shopping, etc. I like to work the weekends, so my days off are usually Sunday & Monday or split during the week. Even just drinking at home and binging on a Netflix series for the day is really good for resting your brain and makes you motivated to work on the thesis the next day. I know it's tempting to just go in everyday, but it really kills the interest.

Even though the PhD is mostly self-directed, treat it like you have a boss expecting a piece of work at the end of the week. Write a daily target in your planner (like reading 3 articles and noting or writing 500 words). Hitting the target at the end of the week is self-motivation and stops you from procrastinating. You could also try exercising in the morning, I found out that quick-starts my energy for the day.

I also found out that it's not helpful to spend the year mostly reading and noting (even though this is expected for the massive literature review)...I can only do about two days of reading then I start working on the writing and go back and forth. You could try to find a conference or two for the upcoming year as well, writing a paper for it/presenting/arguing it out and networking really boosts the confidence.

For social life, you could try joining some clubs. although it's summer so people will most likely be gone till the autumn.

I also was out of academia for a decade, so what helps me is reminding myself that I don't have an actual boss and making me work unpaid overtime! :) I also like job-searching online, it helps to know how much I can make after the degree & figure out different places in the world that I'll move to.

Thread: Publishable Theoretical Paper/Literature Survey Paper

posted
02-Jul-18, 10:51
by Nad75
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posted about 3 months ago
It's helpful to read 'how to' pieces by universities first. This is a helpful one that I used for an article which got published:

Thread: Will I be too old to apply for Ph.D. at the age of 30

posted
26-Jun-18, 12:45
by Nad75
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posted about 4 months ago
Most people in the incoming class with me are in their 30s. It's smart to get a savings buffer before beginning, so you have the financial freedom to attend conferences or travel during the PhD.

Thread: 'Off' Days

posted
20-Jun-18, 09:20
by Nad75
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posted about 4 months ago
I do the same, Kenzie...except I decide to binge with Netflix and pizza or go shopping to reward a piece of good writing. Unscheduled 'off days' are the perks of this PhD position, and necessary for our mental health so don't feel bad for taking them...you won't be able to once you are employed! :)

Thread: Dealing with a **star** supervisor thst is't genuinely interested in your work

posted
30-May-18, 13:30
edited about 20 seconds later
by Nad75
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posted about 5 months ago
For the class that you have helped design and lecture in, is this a defined expected role that was assigned when you became a student? I'm just asking this, because some supervisors do take advantage of their students. I know several that have done most of the conference organising and taught for free, before finding out that they should have been paid. You shouldn't be teaching for free unless it is part of a contractual arrangement, like a fellowship.

Thread: Publishing - How much support is expected from your supervisors

posted
30-May-18, 13:25
by Nad75
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posted about 5 months ago
Hi Jane,

I think most would be okay to read a fully-written draft, with complete references and abstract, just give them plenty of time and of course don't assume they'll be too eager. That way, they can give you feedback in a similar way to the official peer-review editorial process. They are also very willing to point you in the direction of a journal that would be the best fit, as they have much more experience navigating the journal aims and submission process. Some journals are more accepting of early career researchers then others, as it gets to 'double-blind' process only after the initial editor's glance of seeing if it is worthy to pass to peer-review.

Anything more than that may step into co-authorship, which includes developing the argument or reading over incomplete sections and writing on them/suggesting the direction. Of course, you can ask them if they'd be willing to co-author.

Thread: I passed my viva............here is how i did it

posted
27-May-18, 15:25
edited about 9 minutes later
by Nad75
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posted about 5 months ago
Congratulations and Thank you for this! :)
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